Cheap Nutrient Line for Commercial and Home Grows?

f-e

Well-known member
Mentor
i'm not really sure.
i have not, but plan too.

heres the link to the product
https://customhydronutrients.com/mo...504/molasses-crystals-10-pound-bag-p-829.html

Looks like cattle block. It's about 2% down on carbs vs table, and half of that is Potassium. So just 1% unaccounted for but we know it's Iron and Calcium plus some others that are quite field dependent. Presuming it's cattle block. The winter cow lollipop they often tie to a gate.


A bit of reading shows its a common school science project to feed plants table sugar. A couple of teaspoons in a liter may do a lot of good or may harm a plant. This seems to work in soil-less grows where plants are not doing their best at making their own sugars. Which would indicate it's not only the microlife that like a bit of sugar. Though I have often read plants can't use it at the root, from higher learning sources.

Really need to look at them science fair projects and their pics as evidence. I'm out the door though... Things to do
 
Not at all. Beneficials transport and make nutrients available in the root zone. Coco is a good source of trichoderma. Rhizophagus intraradices, azospirillum brasiliense and certain enzymes may benefit from sugar products, even if it isn't in my cup of tea.


ok good deal, you happen to do any research on what beneficial product is you feel is best? Looking at great white right now, for some reason I thought they were an AN product for years, the art style must have thrown me off, so now that I know they're not associated with Mike, I'm considering them.
 
ok good deal, you happen to do any research on what beneficial product is you feel is best? Looking at great white right now, for some reason I thought they were an AN product for years, the art style must have thrown me off, so now that I know they're not associated with Mike, I'm considering them.

Rhizophagus intraradices found in Wallace WOW or Mykos. It's how you get the sparkly white root porn pictures.
 

Lyfespan

Active member
so far this Jacks RO 16oz, jacks calnit 4oz, and epsom 3.5 oz, per 100 gallons is really making girls in coco super happy, roots are exploding from containers.
 

eyesdownchronic

Well-known member
Looks like cattle block. It's about 2% down on carbs vs table, and half of that is Potassium. So just 1% unaccounted for but we know it's Iron and Calcium plus some others that are quite field dependent. Presuming it's cattle block. The winter cow lollipop they often tie to a gate.


A bit of reading shows its a common school science project to feed plants table sugar. A couple of teaspoons in a liter may do a lot of good or may harm a plant. This seems to work in soil-less grows where plants are not doing their best at making their own sugars. Which would indicate it's not only the microlife that like a bit of sugar. Though I have often read plants can't use it at the root, from higher learning sources.

Really need to look at them science fair projects and their pics as evidence. I'm out the door though... Things to do


It's actually a fairly contentious point in the Ag sector. whether plants are able to take up higher order compounds beyond single nutrient ions. usually we work under the assumption that they cannot, however from what i understand plants actually can take up larger compounds, to some extent.

the real question ive always had, is whether plants are able to break down and resynthesize inputs they take up from the soil, or whether they simply going into tissue storage. from what i understand plants can't remetabolize, and it simply goes into storage, but the whole area is largely under researched.

also worth asking whether plants can even take up and utilize C sources via the roots, or if they can only use C gathered via Photosynthesis.


interesting with something like molasses that is generally considered much to large to be taken up via the root. but many people claim to have anecdotally better tasting weed when using molasses (or other Sugar form) . maybe the microbes break down molasses into smaller sugar subunits or organic acids of some form that the plant can take up and that in turn improves flavor? just thinking here.
 

eyesdownchronic

Well-known member
i mean, if you look at people using kelp to supply cytokinin via root drenches. the plant has to be able to take up and use the cytokinin in its complete form, which is a fairly large molecule.
(just an example)
 

f-e

Well-known member
Mentor
I have torched a few marshmallows and while I still eat them, I don't remember the burnt sugar tasting sweet. However give me a J and I will tell you what it was grown in. A few weeks into flower, mine always seem to get less selective. They will eat what they are given, but I generally burn them thinking it's a food demand. I'm just trying to get on top of it. It's just as they finish stacking. When you can't expect any more root system to grow really. It's done I'm thinking. Fit for environment. Let it in... It's just thoughts but there is no doubt most people can tell organic from expanded clay
 

G.O. Joe

Well-known member
also worth asking whether plants can even take up and utilize C sources via the roots, or if they can only use C gathered via Photosynthesis.


interesting with something like molasses that is generally considered much to large to be taken up via the root. but many people claim to have anecdotally better tasting weed when using molasses (or other Sugar form) . maybe the microbes break down molasses into smaller sugar subunits or organic acids of some form that the plant can take up and that in turn improves flavor? just thinking here.

Plant metabolism was investigated pretty heavily as soon as radioactive organic and inorganic chemicals became available for radiotracing experiments. If you could simply feed glucose to plants, it would not be a secret.

Sugar of course is fermented by yeast, releasing CO2 and ethanol. CO2 in moist soil is an acid. Ethanol can be toxic to things, and with oxygen and some help can become acetic acid. Still not entering the plant, except for the pH buffering. Sugar can be toxic to things and if it's converted to something else by an organism, say bacteria, then that organism will grow well, for better or worse. Which bacteria are present to begin with will be pretty variable for people. Has anyone heard good things about a specific product sold as sweetener, long term after the initial rush of enthusiasm?
 

maryjaneismyfre

Well-known member
Giving molasses to plants works wonders, in a non hydro environment, that we know..tried and trusted..I've alternated with xylitol (before it was popular and expensive) and sugar and molasses depending on what I had and what was available for cheap in bulk..I used to mix 10000 L tanks and dump them into the beds..no doubt plants take it up in my mind, they explode even more when already exploding..maybe it is another component, who knows..I reckon i'm with the cascade of nutrients down the resulting exploding microbial food web ending with the mycos feeding a bunch of nutrients of the sugars to the plants..That said I applied sugars with AAC's brewed with alfalfa meal in..shit went bananas..with balanced salts in between and waterings in between..shit thrived.


And yes smoking sugars makes acrid harsh smoke..I'd always flush properly when using sugars..that is what flush and cure is for, controlled starve to rid of sugars and excess nitrogen and the cure for a controlled enzymatic breakdown of leftover sugars as far as I know..to make a smooth smoke where the flavours can shine through..but molasses or sugars can make weed sweeter sure in a situation where the base nutrition is not to point and it is fixing deficiencies..
 
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Lyfespan if I wasn’t sitting on two new bags of Jacks Hydro I’d order some of the RO version. I think you should state the measurements you stated above are in concentrated liquid form. I’d hate for a new Jacks user to confused those for dry weight measurements.
 
https://www.agsolcanada.com/e-store/humates/truehume-fulvic-70-0-0-3-2

It is available here in Canada 2.2 pounds for $40 bucks CND

I am just attempting my first MB grow and have been looking for a cost effective Fulvic acid to use in flush and or all the way ?

Is this a good choice and do i need to back off any MB or Hammer head to accommodate the 3 % K

It's a Leonardite product extracted wtih hydroxides. There are better quality fulvic sources out there.

FulvicXcell is a B2B wholesaler, but has an excellent product up North. I would ask them who retails their products.
 

Lyfespan

Active member
Lyfespan if I wasn’t sitting on two new bags of Jacks Hydro I’d order some of the RO version. I think you should state the measurements you stated above are in concentrated liquid form. I’d hate for a new Jacks user to confused those for dry weight measurements.

those are dry measurements :huggy: and i see no reason to use anything but the RO formula even in hydro, or soil. more calcium, not calnit, or calmag is always a good thing.
 

ButterflyEffect

Well-known member
those are dry measurements :huggy: and i see no reason to use anything but the RO formula even in hydro, or soil. more calcium, not calnit, or calmag is always a good thing.

I was looking at the RO formula compared to the Hydro and is it just me or is the Ca in the RO from CalNit?

Other than the ratios being different, what would the advantage be?

I use rainwater exclusively, so it's something that piques my interest.
 

H G Griffin

Well-known member
Been using the fulvic additive for a few months now. I'm on my second bottle.
Still not 100% convinced I'm seeing much of a difference, but I'll use up this bottle before making a final decision on continuing.
 
Fulvic works as an electrolyte to help the plant absorb nutrients. Depending on how it is produced, it may have minerals like iron or micros. Mr. Fulvic also has amino and beneficial organic acids from shale.

The source of the fulvic acid matters to how it affects your plants.
 

H G Griffin

Well-known member
It's interesting- It is gold in color meaning actual fulvic. There's no potassium, so not hydroxide extracted.



The thing that peaks my interest is that they used phosphoric acid to get the humic acid to fall out instead of citric acid. This is actually an ok quality and unique formulation for a fulvic acid.

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Fulvic works as an electrolyte to help the plant absorb nutrients. Depending on how it is produced, it may have minerals like iron or micros. Mr. Fulvic also has amino and beneficial organic acids from shale.

The source of the fulvic acid matters to how it affects your plants.
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You said it looked like a decent product.

It definitely hasn't hurt anything. I really should take the time and do a proper side by side with cuts from the same mom.
 

Dube

Member
I would like to use the calcium metasolate for outdoor this season. How much per gallon should I be using? Would adding a surfactant like yucca extract help with spreading it on the leaves? Anything else I should add?
 

maryjaneismyfre

Well-known member
For outdoor why not just add bonemeal and dolomite lime or oyster shell etc for calcium? Or just include enough in your feed water if mixing nutes and not making a hot mix..
 
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