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Old 05-27-2017, 07:58 PM #1
MountainBudz
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Guerilla Underground Thread

Decided to create a thread to help out my fellow ICmagger guerillas. This thread shall be polluted with any and all information you would like to know about true guerilla growing. For those of us that cannot simply grow in our backyards... For those of us that have to put blood, sweat and tears into our work and trip over our own feet hauling bales of promix through miles of lush vegetation and rugged terrain. For those of us who wanna achieve all of our goals and make our dreams come to life.

I am going to help you achieve this...

I have several years and grows under my belt guerilla growing here in the hills and hollars of the Southern Appalachian mountains... I have won some and lost some, I have evaluated my mistakes and turned them into success..

I see lots of questions go unanswered on here or answered in ways that cannot help the guerilla grower who is struggling to have the knowledge to succeed on there crops.

Knowledge is power in this game and one simple mistake can cost you your entire grow that you worked your ass off all spring, summer and fall to reap those beautiful buds. Security can cost you your life, your precious time. We are good people folks, and we do good things. What we do is not wrong in any way or form.

So lets get this started... Shoot away with your questions, your curiosity, share your own knowledge, hints, tips etc...

Sometimes I might be a bit delayed from time to time on answering questions, but I have a very busy life schedule atm. I am in the bush every day and some days I am away all day long.

The season is upon us... Let it reign!!!

Mbz...
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Old 05-28-2017, 12:04 PM #2
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Woke up extra early this morning. We were blasted with very strong storms last night and I just had set out 48 2 week old seedlings a couple days ago. Pray for me that the heavy rains and winds didn't cause any damage.

Those that are laying over and survived the aftermath I will stake up with small 6 inch piece of bamboo or sticks.

Suppose to get another strong storm moving in today.

Mistake made... Lesson learned. Been here before but just didn't think. Watch and keep a close eye on the weather folks, plan ahead!

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Old 05-28-2017, 12:49 PM #3
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so 5 things iv been wondering about

1)companion plants to keep pests away, the flower types suggested like chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisys etc stand out to much, other common suggested ones like onion, garlic (not as brightly colored,greener) can take over an area

what can i use that blends in and wont propagate like mad.

2) does spraying essential oils on plants in flower actually keep mold away?

3) any one using osmocote/granular ferts these days?

4) what ruck sack would you recommend for guerrilla growing, around the 80l mark.

5) anyone using drones?

ty
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Old 05-28-2017, 09:57 PM #4
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Originally Posted by VonBudí View Post
so 5 things iv been wondering about

1)companion plants to keep pests away, the flower types suggested like chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisys etc stand out to much, other common suggested ones like onion, garlic (not as brightly colored,greener) can take over an area

what can i use that blends in and wont propagate like mad.

2) does spraying essential oils on plants in flower actually keep mold away?

3) any one using osmocote/granular ferts these days?

4) what ruck sack would you recommend for guerrilla growing, around the 80l mark.

5) anyone using drones?

ty
1) Citronella plants are pretty good at doing that and will survive in rugged conditions if you amend the ground and a bit for them. I always plant around small maple saplings and a tree that grows wild around here called a mimosa . Also I like to plant close to thorn bushes and briars as well because you can train them around the plant pretty well. My area here in the US and where you are at are more than likely totally different. Marigolds would be okay, just pluck the blooms off so they don't stand out so much.

2) Never tried the essential oils, I have only used rosemary oil on an indoor run once to battle spider mites/broad mites and it seemed to work pretty well from what I remember. I have used neem oil outdoors as well as in, and neem oil is proven to help prevent mold but it doesn't cure it. It can also prevent and kill pests that are prone to causing your buds to rot, like the dreaded bud worms, tobacco worms, tomato worms and corn borers... They feed on the bud and drill tunnels through the bud which causes buds to start rotting and also the feces they leave in your buds can turn a whole crop of heavy colas in a whole mess of mushy botrytis as well. My biggest problem growing outdoors here are bud worms causing rot.

3) Yes I have used osmocote a few years outdoors. I usually combine it with organics and they seem to love the combination. Sometimes I use it as a stand alone for plots that I don't visit often. Just put some osmocote in the ground today and several different holes honestly lol. Seems like good stuff. If you need a quicker boost from time to time use water soluble jacks classic line fertilizers and if hauling water is a problem just sprinkle it around the base of the plant before a good rain. It works very well. Double up on the dose as some will be washed away especially if there is no barrier to keep it concentrated around the base of the plant.

4) I just use a good ole large camo backpack from walmart and it works well. I have my pack on my back, another smaller bag with drinks and snacks on my shoulder and usually have both hands full at the same time with tools, sprayer, amendments etc...

5) Funny you mentioned it. I was just talking and thinking about purchasing a drone a few days ago. I will be purchasing one next month to help keep an eye on my plants and crops without so much foot traffic and physical approaches. I will also use it for finding potential grow areas, much faster than searching on foot when you are in a rush for the season. They can also give you an idea of the view the pilot has from the chopper and you can see any opportunities to fix bare spots on the ground or anything that makes them stand out.

Sorry if I didn't answer your questions to your satisfaction, let me know if there is any confusion and i'll help clear it up. Anything else ask away partner!


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Old 05-29-2017, 05:02 AM #5
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I had good results with Espoma Garden-Tone organic fertilizer. Worked a few cups per big hole at planting and then top dressed once a month. When top dressing, break up crust on top of soil digging only about 1/2-3/4 inch deep. Move the extra soil toward the center and raise your garden mound up. Doing this several times works in fertilizer well and provides more volume for root mass. Air exchange to soil is improved and giving roots more oxygen. Believe me the plants respond!








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Old 05-29-2017, 06:13 AM #6
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I had good results with Espoma Garden-Tone organic fertilizer. Worked a few cups per big hole at planting and then top dressed once a month. When top dressing, break up crust on top of soil digging only about 1/2-3/4 inch deep. Move the extra soil toward the center and raise your garden mound up. Doing this several times works in fertilizer well and provides more volume for root mass. Air exchange to soil is improved and giving roots more oxygen. Believe me the plants respond!

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Beautiful patch there pipeline.

Good tips as well...

But use caution. Epsoma Garden Tone is very good fertilizer and I use it every year in my grows. I only mix it into my container grows in the bush though. You need to know exactly what kind of critters you have around your environment. Do you have coons? Opossums? Coyotes? Bears? Wolves? Bobcats? If you answered yes to any of the listed animals, it is likely they will dig up your holes/patches out of curiosity to see what was buried there. Sometimes they do this even without the "smelly" organics, even using chemicals. They think that an animal has buried something there or that there is food in the hole.

I have ran up on many patches and holes back in the day with uprooted plants, destroyed to pieces because of organics. Especially any blood, bone or fishy smelling stuff. Sometimes even bird guano or chicken poop. Because they know a chicken is food and that a chicken has been there.

Now if your environment is controlled and secure use all the organics you want. But in most cases, guerilla grows are not.

Pipeline, what kind of wildlife do you have in your area? Is your patch secured with any fencing or defense of any kind? If wild animals are abundant in your area and you use this with no problems you are a lucky man or they have just become used to it being there after checking out of curiosity in the past.

If you do however wanna use organic granular ferts, then make sure you amend the ground a week or two before planting to give the critters time to dig around and check it out for themselves.

A good granular fertilizer to use, although chemical is from the local farm supply stores in your area. 20-20-20 or 10-20-30, or whatever number you want they usually have it or can customize for you if your area is well known for farming then you will for sure find this stuff.

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Old 05-29-2017, 06:17 AM #7
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Forgot to note that the granular chemical fertilizers from farm stores is usually very cheap. Between 10 to 20 bucks for a 50lb bag and that will go a very very long way especially if you are growing on a commercial level or on a budget.
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Old 05-29-2017, 09:09 PM #8
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ty both. deadheading marigolds it is. Granular on the to do list hopefully next year. any one doing a seed patch?
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Old 05-30-2017, 12:39 AM #9
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ty both. deadheading marigolds it is. Granular on the to do list hopefully next year. any one doing a seed patch?
Sounds like a plan bro.

Yes, i'm doing a seed patch. I usually set 65 or so out per patch of regular non fem seeds. Also doing clones and fem seed.
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Old 05-30-2017, 02:27 AM #10
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Where I live the soil is very hard to dig in. So when I find the right spot the year before a grow I will pack in drywall pieces that I got from a construction site. The gypsum in the drywall loosens up the soil and makes digging effortless. Also it gives a bump to calcium and sulfur levels. Powder about 4 cups worth with a stone and mix it in with the native dirt. Come next spring Shangri la.
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