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Horse manure and nothing else

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    Horse manure and nothing else

    I've recently been chatting with an old timey OG grower. We've traded some genetics and talked shop, etc. When I quizzed him about his process (soils, nutes, amendments, etc.) he blew me away. He says that he uses nothing more than overwintered horse manure - that's it. He plants clones directly into 100% manure (no perlite/compost/ewc/anything) and gives them nothing but water right up until harvest. I thought he was pulling my leg until he gave me some teenage clones in 2 liter bottles and lo and behold he was serious.

    Has anyone ever tried this? His plants looked great, and life would be a whole lot simpler if the only thing I ever needed to do was pour some R/o water into them. In addition, he uses way smaller pots than I would think would be possible. He says that because the manure is so much denser than potting soil (it is at least 2-3x as heavy) there are more nutes per cubic foot so he needs less to accomplish the yield.

    #2
    the first thing that came to mind to me was The Botany of Desire. The author wanted to grow a few plants for 'research'/curiosity, just threw a few seeds in some horse manure, and as you said, came back months later to find 8' plants growing out behind his barn. lol
    Past OD: https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=219225
    https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread....52#post1738552

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      #3
      IMO unless horse manure is composted not a great option. They only have one stomach and weed seeds can pass through. I've seen property that was amended with horse manure and you get these 'super' weeds which are simply obnoxious. I've never seen weed issues with cow manure. I told a friend he was gonna mess up his property bringing in a lot of horse manure and didn't listen and it's been taken over by weeds.

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        #4
        Manitoid is the man you want to talk to regarding this subject.

        2010: https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=183587
        2011: https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=208144

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          #5
          I can understand how this would work from a science standpoint. Most horse manure piles have been worked over by worms real good so a lot of the "manure" would in fact be worm castings.

          If the horses were fed alfalfa and other grasses, the manure would contain elements and compounds from the feed stock. These would still be available in the aged horse shit. There would be significant biological activity so that other than being a bit under aerated perhaps, it could work quite well.

          b_d

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            #6
            aged horse would be a good enough medium, but how did his herb taste? was it full bodied? flavor good? what strain?
            sigpic

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              #7
              my worm bin started off as aged horse manure / have left squash and peas grow in it {voulnteers} and they veg'd well but produced very little in the way of flower/fruit

              as mentioned feedstocks of the horse(s) could factor in quite a bit / also wouldn't necessarily go the RO route since minerals in the guy's well water could be a factor in his success

              have grown out plants {veggies} w/ great success in small worm bins top'd off w/ soil mix {per sig thread} small worm bins were aged horse manure and worms but prob 50/50 w/ the soil mix

              the manure worm combo was a bit hot @ 1st even after having worms in the aged HM for prob a month {aged @ least 1 seaason per the worm's oreference}
              Getting started w/ living soil
              The Divinity within the flower was and is sufficient in Itself
              sigpic

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                #8
                Horse shit and worms. A little bone meal.
                “I'm in a constant process of thinking about things. ”
                ― Richard Brautigan

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                  #9
                  Feed the horse seeds.......Post 666. Ooooouuuuu.....

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                    #10
                    My father-in-law has two horses, so last week I brought home some 3-4 year old manure. I've been using it as an amendment to Roots Organic soil since then, but now I'm going to run a test. I've got some clones that are just throwing roots, so I will transplant some into straight aged manure and the rest into my normal soil mix. From there on out I will only water the manure plants, and use General Organics on the soil mix. I'll keep ya posted on what happens.

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                      #11
                      Tagged.
                      I'm NOT a botanist, but I play one on the internet



                      If anything posted by this user has offended you,.. please unread it

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Nondual View Post
                        IMO unless horse manure is composted not a great option. They only have one stomach and weed seeds can pass through. I've seen property that was amended with horse manure and you get these 'super' weeds which are simply obnoxious. I've never seen weed issues with cow manure. I told a friend he was gonna mess up his property bringing in a lot of horse manure and didn't listen and it's been taken over by weeds.
                        I have been around horses most of my life and it is very rare that a horse will eat weeds, in fact they are very fussy eaters and that is why it is good to run cows after horses so all things get eaten.

                        My belief is that where ever he got the horse manure from had penty of weed seed flying around and was tranfered that way.

                        I use horse manure all the time and yes it does have to be broken down, but for a very good healthy plant it is also good to add other nutrients to it as it doesnt carry all the goodies.
                        STAY YOUNG AND GROW EM BIG

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                          #13
                          Mostnonymouse - thanks for the links to Manitoid's threads. I have a lot of reading ahead.

                          Randy - I haven't been able to sample his meds, so I can't tell you how they tasted.

                          As mentioned, I've been using composted horse poo for the last week as an amendment when transplanting my girls, and I've noticed how crazy dense this stuff is. I've been breaking it up with a little hammer prior to mixing it into the soil (1 part manure, 1 part recycled soil, 3 parts new soil), and even at that rate I can tell which pots have the poo in them because of the extra weight. Based on this, I can't figure out how using this stuff straight w/o perlite could allow for good root development. I can't see how any air could get down there, and after watering this stuff it stays wet forever. Then again, I'm not a botanist. Can someone explain how our plant's roots manage to penetrate this stuff? If I was growing real trees (i.e. maples/oaks/elms) I would totally understand how their massive root system could bust through - they tear up concrete after all - but how does our little annual plant do it?

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                            #14
                            I would guess it doesn't. I would add more perlite, pumice, lava rock, rice hulls or something to your mix to help with air flow. I doubt the main quality that makes horse poop worth using is its denseness. I know for a fact all plants do not like compaction of soil in the root zone. Not sure why your buddy thinks otherwise.

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                              #15
                              that was the question i wanted to ask - did you smoke any of his buds? some of these old hippies tend to grow weed that is way too N rich and it doesnt smoke so well.....

                              im sure they would grow in straight horse manure but that diesnt mean its a good thing to grow them in - possibly too rich, too water retentive. great at about 20% but not so good at 100% imo.

                              VG
                              My contributions to this website in no way imply support for any political or cultural views promoted here.
                              -----
                              To the large and singular furniture of this noble island i have added from foreign places all the variety of herbs and flowers that i might any way obtain. I've laboured with the soil to make it fit for plants, and with the plants that they might delight in the soil - so they might live and prosper under our climate as in their native and proper country.
                              Gerard's Herbal (1636)

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