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Welcome to the PTSD forum.

Phaeton

Speed of Dark
My brother was injured in Afghanistan (non war related) and has PTSD really bad. Weed never helped, I was always trying to get him to try different strains but he thinks about war a lot when he smokes. He actually got shitty with me because I told him I just haven't found the right strains for him but he believes weed will only make it worse.

There are conditions that pot does not help in the least and there are people who cannot use marijuana in a safe and controlled manner. Period.
It is not the strain of pot, it is the strain of person that is nonfunctional.
One size has never fit all.
If you are pushing your idea of a cure so hard that friends have to get "shitty" with you then perhaps it would be better for all concerned for you to just back off and not add to the stress.

I tried starting a thread on this but not being good with words it ended up fairly dismal. Seems like a good idea though, just not practical at this time, who knows why.
 

aridbud

automeister
ICMag Supporter
ICMag Donor
There are conditions that pot does not help in the least and there are people who cannot use marijuana in a safe and controlled manner. Period.
It is not the strain of pot, it is the strain of person that is nonfunctional.
One size has never fit all.
If you are pushing your idea of a cure so hard that friends have to get "shitty" with you then perhaps it would be better for all concerned for you to just back off and not add to the stress.

I tried starting a thread on this but not being good with words it ended up fairly dismal. Seems like a good idea though, just not practical at this time, who knows why.

Yes.....sometimes it's better to have a professional deal with PTSD symptoms....they vary.
 

Mary57

Member
ITA; thanks, @Phaeton.

Sadly, all that some doctors are allowed to diagnose are symptoms. Poor communication skills are a symptom. ITA with @aridbud too

Talking about symptoms doesn't make them go away for me. It never does. Maybe it works for other people, but in my case, all it does is freak out my plants.

Take care and me too; see ya around the appropriate newbie forums, @sunshineinabag
 

billy_big_bud!

Proud Cannadian Cannabist
after a solid 2 months of microdosing psylicybin i can state beyond a doubt that i have had genuine improvement in literally every category of my mental health to different degrees but improvement across the board. i would equally accept the possibility of the placebo effect as i was absolutely certain it would make a change so that may be a factor but i am drastically different than i was 2 months ago despite a major stumble during that period of time, i still rebounded and leveled back out. it is far from perfect or a cure all at this dose but im definitely a believer but again, i was before i even started.
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
PTSD is not my biggest problem. but my physical handicap is a hard to live with. I lost my left eye, and was burned over 48% of my body. from an I.E.D. exploding under my feet. My right eye is almost gone now completely, and can't be fixed due to the permanent damage. I'm fucked when comes to finding my lost dog, or other important things. It seems like I lose a lot of stuff all the time. I'm not allowed to drive ever again and the only transportation I have, is my bicycle which I love. When someone takes me to the store and I can't find the stuff I looking for,, its so frustrating. For instance I wanted some instant chocolate pudding and it took me 30 mins to find it. All you people, if you can see then count your blessing. I'm blessed to get to use visual impairment equipment from the state to get around on the web and CCTV that magnifies stuff. State and Veterans Administration says I'm blind, but I can still see a little! 😎
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
The best treatment for PTSD is to have a garden somewhere. The same goes for a Therapist, Mother Nature, and going in the woods. Year round there was always something one could do outside. Since I can't go onto the woods anymore because my handicap, I do setting meditation every morning and that helps a lot. Stopping and taking time to focus on the present moment, and counting my blessings. Everything changes. 😎
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
The hardest and most important part of my PTSD today and every day is remembering, not give a fuck, I forget all the time.!😎
 

Sunshineinabag

Active member
@sunshineinabag I don't care either and I bet you're a better driver than most of those doogie howsers out there who don't even know that "doogie howser" is a derogatory term.

I'd rather get in a car with you than with any Millenials I am unfortunate enough to know, no offense intended to any millenial who might be reading this because they are also part of the club that nobody wants to join.

I wasn't in Nam, it's just a "something like that" that maybe only people who actually were can understand. If you think I'm bad about my male cannabis plants, just don't ever ask me why I don't carry a smartphone or why I run around barefoot.

Just don't ask, lol. My doctor, my dispensary, and my auto breeder are all working on that diligently along with all of my medical AND recreational ladies, but in the meantime, I'm just a major piece of work and not really "friend" material for humans, lol.

It's just nice to have a safe place where I don't have to feel quite so all alone.

Doogie howser don't yield for anyone
 

Sunshineinabag

Active member
The best treatment for PTSD is to have a garden somewhere. The same goes for a Therapist, Mother Nature, and going in the woods. Year round there was always something one could do outside. Since I can't go onto the woods anymore because my handicap, I do setting meditation every morning and that helps a lot. Stopping and taking time to focus on the present moment, and counting my blessings. Everything changes. 😎

Right after a heavy rain......first light dawn......
:rtfo:
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
There's always one rule of thumb PTSD people must never forget no matter what! Never forget the phrase, don't kill the "Mother Fucker" no matter what! Your life will never be the same again if you do! Sometimes it's hard but Pray for them instead for lasting peace. 😎
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
Just taking it easy and taking care of myself is the most important part of PTSD therapy. Since I can't go camping in the woods anymore I brought the campsite to me. I can sleep in the rain, in a rainstorm or in the open under the stars cold or hot. It is so nice to be able to stay outdoors all the time. My hammock even has a place for my vaporizer. Just taking it easy and hanging.😎
 

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Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
I can't forget my therapy dog and his friends. They are with me 24/7 and help me practice patience. 😎
 

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Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
Every single day, 22 veterans take their own lives. That’s 22 suicides a day, a suicide every 65 minutes. As shocking as that number is, the real number may actually be higher. If you know someone that has PTSD and a war vet, listen to them carefully and take them seriously. 😎
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
One of the good things about living one day at a time is if this one didn't go well, we always have tomorrow and can start over new. The same goes for last year and the new year. Happy New Year everyone and GOD bless all of you. 😎
 

Boocoodinkydow

Well-known member
Every single day, 22 veterans take their own lives. That’s 22 suicides a day, a suicide every 65 minutes. As shocking as that number is, the real number may actually be higher. If you know someone that has PTSD and a war vet, listen to them carefully and take them seriously. 😎

In 2010 I was devastated when I found an article stating 300,000 of my fellow Vietnam vets had taken there on lives. That exceeded battlefield casualties by 5 fold. STAGGERING!!

This horrific statistic must be laid at the feet of the ineffective Veterans Administration health care system. It suffers from systemic failure at all levels.

I was deemed 100% disabled for PTSD and been on mood stabilizing drugs since 1992. Cannabis has been of great help but I find pharmaceuticals still necessary for break through episodes.

Our local VA clinic is staffed by a band of traveling troubadours, never seeing the same physician twice.

The first of last year my regularly scheduled psychiatric appointment was conducted via phone with a doctor I’d never met. In his infinite wisdom he theorized my malady wasn’t due to PTSD but rather low testosterone levels and sleep apnea and recommended I seek treatment for his new diagnosis outside the VA network. He refused to renew 2 prescriptions I had been relying on for nearly 30 years. Cold turkey withdrawal from drugs that should be stopped gradually resulted in a 3 day hospital stay for severe a-fib. The attending cardiologist was appalled by my psychiatrist’s action and said the resulting stress brought on by lack of the meds were probably the culprit.

My story is, unfortunately, not unique. You don’t have to look far to find gross malpractice from these so-called doctors that are incapable of making it in the private practice environment and find refuge behind the protective cloak of the VA health care system !!!

Its an appalling situation that needs to be remedied.
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
In 2010 I was devastated when I found an article stating 300,000 of my fellow Vietnam vets had taken there on lives. That exceeded battlefield casualties by 5 fold. STAGGERING!!

This horrific statistic must be laid at the feet of the ineffective Veterans Administration health care system. It suffers from systemic failure at all levels.

I was deemed 100% disabled for PTSD and been on mood stabilizing drugs since 1992. Cannabis has been of great help but I find pharmaceuticals still necessary for break through episodes.

Our local VA clinic is staffed by a band of traveling troubadours, never seeing the same physician twice.

The first of last year my regularly scheduled psychiatric appointment was conducted via phone with a doctor I’d never met. In his infinite wisdom he theorized my malady wasn’t due to PTSD but rather low testosterone levels and sleep apnea and recommended I seek treatment for his new diagnosis outside the VA network. He refused to renew 2 prescriptions I had been relying on for nearly 30 years. Cold turkey withdrawal from drugs that should be stopped gradually resulted in a 3 day hospital stay for severe a-fib. The attending cardiologist was appalled by my psychiatrist’s action and said the resulting stress brought on by lack of the meds were probably the culprit.

My story is, unfortunately, not unique. You don’t have to look far to find gross malpractice from these so-called doctors that are incapable of making it in the private practice environment and find refuge behind the protective cloak of the VA health care system !!!

Its an appalling situation that needs to be remedied.

Any aversion one carries only hurts the one carrying it. Accepting the moment can be hard when it comes to some realities you don't like, my friend. Non-accepting won't change anything and hurts the one carrying the resentment.. PTSD people do better when they're not angry at someone or something. My RX for PTSD is to stay present and not allow too much distance between where I am and my mind at the moment. I'm powerless over those Dr's. at the VA and all that other stuff, but I'm not powerless from staying present. I spend as little time as I can thinking about the things I'm powerless over, and more time thinking on things that are in my and my loved one's best interests. Those people above committed suicide on a life long before they ever pulled the trigger. There's always hope and a chance if one really tries and works with things in the present. Quitters never Win, & Winners never Quit. 😎
 
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