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We grow vegetable gardens too! Post your Garden pics here

Littleleaf

Well-known member
Veteran
So far this season...
purple spuds 57lbs
78 lbs purple.jpg



reds 105lbs

105 lbs.jpg


yukon gold 105lbs to witch is odd...

yukon gols 105lb.jpg
 

Cuddles

Well-known member
So far this season...
purple spuds 57lbs
View attachment 19012141


reds 105lbs

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yukon gold 105lbs to witch is odd...

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WOW. you really are a pretty busy farmer!
:p
and since you got so many potatoes I was wondering if you would mind sharing some storage tips?
I buy mine in bulk these days and they always develop those sprouty-thingies (sorry but I forgot what they´re called exactly) .
Is there a good and easy way to prevent this from happening?

I was told that it´s best to keep them in a dark place but that hasn´t really worked in the past :(

I also heard that potatoes keep best when they´re not on top of each other but this is not an option for me.
My kitchen is really small and I have practically zero storage space for anything at all. :(
 

Littleleaf

Well-known member
Veteran
WOW. you really are a pretty busy farmer!
:p
and since you got so many potatoes I was wondering if you would mind sharing some storage tips?
I buy mine in bulk these days and they always develop those sprouty-thingies (sorry but I forgot what they´re called exactly) .
Is there a good and easy way to prevent this from happening?

I was told that it´s best to keep them in a dark place but that hasn´t really worked in the past :(

I also heard that potatoes keep best when they´re not on top of each other but this is not an option for me.
My kitchen is really small and I have practically zero storage space for anything at all. :(
That is a good question on HOW. I've found the colder the better. Anything under 50f will slow the eyes from sprouting. Most store bought spuds are sprayed with sht. (don't know what) to keep them from sprouting eyes.

To keep them from rotting. Cover them with lime.

A cellar is the best place to store them. Wish I had one. Brother and I are going to build one over the next year......

Learn how to can and they can be froze too.. Canned spuds will last for years.

These yellow wax beans are from just 3 plants. A good half gallon of them. Have way more to pick. Will be freezing some and canning the rest.
yellow wax from 3 plants.jpg
 

xtsho

Well-known member
I'll humbly post my meager garlic harvest. It was just from store bought garlic that sprouted and I planted last fall. I sure wish I had the space some people have. I really have to plan out my space to maximize things. After I pulled the garlic I immediately amended the soil with compost and planted cucumbers. When the cucumbers are finished I'll plant either beets, radishes, or lettuce in that spot. I try and get three harvests out of my spaces.

garlic06062024.jpg
 

negative37dBA

Well-known member
Veteran
I have been doing a bunch of terracing by hand. 🍒Expanding my food growing area. Big plans for next year. Working on adding a few raised beds up on a hill I have. Nice full sun and water available.
Working on cloning some Choke cherries to expand on what I have. They make a hella tasty syrup. Woot!
IMG_8820 - Copy.JPG

Have a great day all. Peace, negative.
 

xtsho

Well-known member
Course you do..
Put a short vid up to show us all then.

Apparently you've never heard of sweet onions like Walla Walla or Vidalia. They're both commonly eaten raw which I'm sure most people that garden and grow onions already know.

Eating sweet onions raw can be a delightful experience. Sweet onions, such as Vidalia or Walla Walla varieties, are mild and crispy, lacking the strong sulfuric punch of regular onions. Here’s what you should know:

  1. Nutrition Facts: Onions, regardless of type, offer vitamins, minerals, and plant compounds. For instance, 100 grams of white onion provides about 33 calories, 8 grams of carbohydrates, and 6 grams of natural sugars. Red onions have slightly more calories and yellow onions fall in between. All onions contain dietary fiber, which is beneficial for gut health1.
  2. Health Benefits:
    • Heart Health: Regular onion consumption supports heart health. Onions contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, especially quercetin, which may have antihypertensive effects. Quercetin has also been linked to reduced triglycerides and cholesterol levels.
    • Blood Sugar Regulation: A small study found that eating 100 grams of raw red onion significantly reduced fasting blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.
    • Digestive Health: Onions are a natural source of prebiotics (like inulin), which promote healthy gut bacteria growth.
    • Skin Health: Loaded with vitamins A, C, and K, onions contribute to maintaining flawless skin.
  3. Enjoying Raw Onions: Raw onions, especially red ones, are commonly used in salads due to their crisp texture and zesty flavor. You can also add them to salsas, sandwiches, or ceviche. Sweet onions are particularly pleasant when eaten raw because of their mildness and crunchiness.
So go ahead and enjoy those sweet onions raw—they’re not only tasty but also good for you! 😊🌱
 

sdd420

Well-known member
Veteran
Apparently you've never heard of sweet onions like Walla Walla or Vidalia. They're both commonly eaten raw which I'm sure most people that garden and grow onions already know.

Eating sweet onions raw can be a delightful experience. Sweet onions, such as Vidalia or Walla Walla varieties, are mild and crispy, lacking the strong sulfuric punch of regular onions. Here’s what you should know:

  1. Nutrition Facts: Onions, regardless of type, offer vitamins, minerals, and plant compounds. For instance, 100 grams of white onion provides about 33 calories, 8 grams of carbohydrates, and 6 grams of natural sugars. Red onions have slightly more calories and yellow onions fall in between. All onions contain dietary fiber, which is beneficial for gut health1.
  2. Health Benefits:
    • Heart Health: Regular onion consumption supports heart health. Onions contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, especially quercetin, which may have antihypertensive effects. Quercetin has also been linked to reduced triglycerides and cholesterol levels.
    • Blood Sugar Regulation: A small study found that eating 100 grams of raw red onion significantly reduced fasting blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.
    • Digestive Health: Onions are a natural source of prebiotics (like inulin), which promote healthy gut bacteria growth.
    • Skin Health: Loaded with vitamins A, C, and K, onions contribute to maintaining flawless skin.
  3. Enjoying Raw Onions: Raw onions, especially red ones, are commonly used in salads due to their crisp texture and zesty flavor. You can also add them to salsas, sandwiches, or ceviche. Sweet onions are particularly pleasant when eaten raw because of their mildness and crunchiness.
So go ahead and enjoy those sweet onions raw—they’re not only tasty but also good for you! 😊🌱
I like green onions raw too
 

xtsho

Well-known member
I like green onions raw too

Green onions are great. I use a ton of those as I cook a lot of Asian food.

My lady likes onions as much as I do. We go through so many I've started buying them in 25lb bags. In fact I'm eating a bowl of caramelized onions and cabbage right now. I make a big pot of them from time to time and use them as a side dish with dinner. Once caramelized even just regular yellow onions taste like candy. I used to make onion pie but haven't for quite a few years. I think I'll make one in the near future. It's tasty.

A slice of onion pie and a bowl of onion soup. Pure heaven. Onions are considered a superfood.

carmelizedwithcabbage.jpg

onionsoup.jpg

onions.jpg
 

oldmaninbc

Well-known member
Green onions are great. I use a ton of those as I cook a lot of Asian food.

My lady likes onions as much as I do. We go through so many I've started buying them in 25lb bags. In fact I'm eating a bowl of caramelized onions and cabbage right now. I make a big pot of them from time to time and use them as a side dish with dinner. Once caramelized even just regular yellow onions taste like candy. I used to make onion pie but haven't for quite a few years. I think I'll make one in the near future. It's tasty.

A slice of onion pie and a bowl of onion soup. Pure heaven. Onions are considered a superfood.

View attachment 19018578
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Oh yeah, caramelized onions are very good and can be useful in different ways.
The soup looks delicious.
 

xtsho

Well-known member
Picked about a gallon of peas this morning from one of the spots I planted them in. This spot is done. Gonna give a couple days for the stragglers then rip them out and plant something else. We had a couple 90 degree days that finished them off. I have a couple spots where I started some later and the heat didn't affect the younger plants. Now that we're cooling off and will be in the mid 70°f range for awhile those should make it to harvest before it heats back up again.

peas06232024.jpg



I grow lettuce in small nursery pots of coco off the ground. It keeps the slugs and many other pests away. It keeps the lettuce clean except for a few needles that fall from the fir trees in the back.

lettuce06232024.jpg



Potatoes The tall ones are Yukon gold and the shorter ones are russets. The russets were store bought potatoes that sprouted and the Yukon's are from seed potato I bought at a nursery and were planted quite a bit after the russets. They sure grew fast. I carefully dug around next to one of the russets and found some decent sized potatoes. But they have awhile to go unless I dig some baby potatoes which I just might do.

potatoes06232024.jpg



Pole beans I call this my Bean Machine.

polebeans06232024.jpg



Bush beans, rutabagas, beets, and cilantro. The beets are getting buried by the beans. I planted things much too close. I let the cilantro go to seed each year and harvest the coriander seeds for culinary purposes.

bushbeans06232024.jpg
 
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