uzebekistan... the giant indica!!

ngakpa

Active member
if people are resurrecting this, it's worth noting that Northern Lights found its way into this "Uzbek" somewhere along the line in Spain

I forget the details, but iirc it's mentioned in one of the subforums, if not in the strain descriptions of the seedbanks
 

funkyhorse

Well-known member
Hi ngakpa
Both Uzbek lines are available commercially. The uzbek offered by USC it seems to be the one from La Mano Negra


And this is the description of Taskenti by Cannabiogen:

A 98% Indica originated in Uzbekistan. Its name comes from one of the best hash in the world, according to experts; a very powerful and resinous strain, of enormous yield, mainly outdoors.
I must say that the Taskenti isn't 100% pure landrace but has a bit of Northern Lights in its genetics, although it's said to be bred to a +98% uzbekistan hashplant.
It has a refined and subtle hashish perfume, a shade between mint and lemon, very intense.

Original latitude and height cultivation conditions have made its acclimatization very simple, similar to Southern Spain Mountains. Nevertheless a meticulous selection and improvement work has been done to fix genetic dominance for the most important aspects, allowing simultaneously diversifying the zones of growing indoors (also hydroponics) and outdoors.

Indoors plants mature in 7-9 weeks, needing a good ventilation and dry atmosphere, mainly in flowering. Vegetative period: Minimum 30 days for high performance

Indoors: 55-65 days
Outdoors: middle October


I hope it helps
 

Carraxe

Well-known member
if people are resurrecting this, it's worth noting that Northern Lights found its way into this "Uzbek" somewhere along the line in Spain

I forget the details, but iirc it's mentioned in one of the subforums, if not in the strain descriptions of the seedbanks




CBG said they used a Sensi's Northern Lights for the first step of the breeding but they backcrossed to the Uzbeks and selected for Uzbek characteristics, so the final result is nothing like a Northern Lights.

I understand that crossing a well known indica strain with a dominant one like the Uzbek can help to show or highlight some features that are naturally hidden in a standard landrace population. The landrace populations are usually quite homogeneous, there is little variation, so it is difficult to select and to choose specimens without making some cross before.

I've grown many CBG Taskentis and I can say that there is no enough NL on them to notice. You can't notice NL on the shape, growth, smell or taste, and the effect is very distinctive.

Sweet smokes
 

Carraxe

Well-known member
Hi ngakpa
Both Uzbek lines are available commercially. The uzbek offered by USC it seems to be the one from La Mano Negra


[...]


I hope it helps


I would like to note that, while CBG people seem to be very trustworthy in their work method, LMN has worked in deliberate secrecy, and many of his works have obvious genetic additions that weren't explained properly in its time. Now there is no way to get an answer.



I'd choose CBG over LMN no doubt. But I can say I've got some plants that inherited LMN work that rock, and I've had some that don't. Like things described as sativas but with too much obvious indica influence.



Sweet smokes
 

ngakpa

Active member
this is the description of Taskenti by Cannabiogen:

A 98% Indica originated in Uzbekistan. Its name comes from one of the best hash in the world, according to experts; a very powerful and resinous strain, of enormous yield, mainly outdoors.
I must say that the Taskenti isn't 100% pure landrace but has a bit of Northern Lights in its genetics, although it's said to be bred to a +98% uzbekistan hashplant.

it's good that CBG is being transparent about this
 

ngakpa

Active member
CBG said they used a Sensi's Northern Lights for the first step of the breeding but they backcrossed to the Uzbeks and selected for Uzbek characteristics, so the final result is nothing like a Northern Lights.

I understand that crossing a well known indica strain with a dominant one like the Uzbek can help to show or highlight some features that are naturally hidden in a standard landrace population. The landrace populations are usually quite homogeneous, there is little variation, so it is difficult to select and to choose specimens without making some cross before.

I've grown many CBG Taskentis and I can say that there is no enough NL on them to notice. You can't notice NL on the shape, growth, smell or taste, and the effect is very distinctive.

Sweet smokes

hi -

ok, but it's not about whether the landrace has become like Northern Lights, it's simply about transparency

Re. "landrace populations are usually quite homogeneous"...

in terms of morphology and chemotype, first-generation landraces are very seldom homogeneous... there's usually substantial variation of morphology, potency, aroma, finishing time etc. within the population of single landrace

that said, friends of mine have worked with landraces that have come via breeders and those have been pretty homogenous. That's most likely because of starting with a small number of plants and inbreeding.
 

Carraxe

Well-known member
hi -

ok, but it's not about whether the landrace has become like Northern Lights, it's simply about transparency

Re. "landrace populations are usually quite homogeneous"...

in terms of morphology and chemotype, first-generation landraces are very seldom homogeneous... there's usually substantial variation of morphology, potency, aroma, finishing time etc. within the population of single landrace

that said, friends of mine have worked with landraces that have come via breeders and those have been pretty homogenous. That's most likely because of starting with a small number of plants and inbreeding.

That's your opinion. My experience is different, and I've grown quite a lot of landraces. If there was that substantial variation between specimens in a landrace, it would be quite easy to select individuals. But it is not, that's why it is much easier to mix with something else and make F1 and F2 to check and select the interesting characteristics.
 
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