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"Semi auto" landraces?

revegeta666

Well-known member
Hi! Hopefully someone can educate me on this subject :)

I have been wondering about the actual meaning of "semi auto" when talking about landraces. For example lebanese, moroccan, or zamal. When people say "semi", are they referring only to the way they start flowering earlier and also when roots are space restricted? They don't tolerate irregularities in the photoperiod like rudelaris autos would, do they? Were they to be exposed to light pollution, would they also react by showing intersex?

It makes me think that they are not really autoflowering plants like rudelaris in the sense that rudelaris has a biologic ticking clock that makes it flower. It's more like they flower as a stress response to being rootbound. Is that fair?

Because isn't this what happens with some older mother plants that start flowering in small pots? In Spain there is a famous and overrated clone of Critical Mass, that is over 25 years old. It is quite annoying to keep as a mom because it seems as soon as the roots touch the edge of the pot, it will start flowering. Is this a similar situation? Just plants that are extremely eager to flower as a survival mechanism?
 

revegeta666

Well-known member
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Over at the ACE subforum in the Lebanese thread @repuk had a Lebanese P3 in a big pot keep flowering outdoors despite the hours getting longer. Nobody would have expected it, not even @dubi. Dont know if its the exception to the rule though.

I already asked him myself in the last page of that thread lol. According to what he says, lebanese should react like normal photoperiodic plants to interruptions in night hours. So I guess it was an exception maybe. Curious to see what others say.

I was also asking because right now I have a zamal cross, and a couple of the females look really eager to start flowering. They have been preflowering for 2 weeks or so. Not even stretching yet, just producing a big amount of pistils. The other females just barely showed sex and dont seem to have intentions of flowering.
 

goingrey

Well-known member
Hi! Hopefully someone can educate me on this subject :)

I have been wondering about the actual meaning of "semi auto" when talking about landraces. For example lebanese, moroccan, or zamal. When people say "semi", are they referring only to the way they start flowering earlier and also when roots are space restricted? They don't tolerate irregularities in the photoperiod like rudelaris autos would, do they? Were they to be exposed to light pollution, would they also react by showing intersex?

It makes me think that they are not really autoflowering plants like rudelaris in the sense that rudelaris has a biologic ticking clock that makes it flower. It's more like they flower as a stress response to being rootbound. Is that fair?

Because isn't this what happens with some older mother plants that start flowering in small pots? In Spain there is a famous and overrated clone of Critical Mass, that is over 25 years old. It is quite annoying to keep as a mom because it seems as soon as the roots touch the edge of the pot, it will start flowering. Is this a similar situation? Just plants that are extremely eager to flower as a survival mechanism?
Yeah I think that's fair. Not real auto like ruderalis, but very eager to flower.

Dunno about the Spanish Crit but my best mom is really eager to put out pistils but it's kinda just perpetually preflowering and not really flowering. Can take clones and let them grow big no problem. It isn't really annoying at all IMO, just how it is.
 

Douglas.Curtis

Autistic Diplomat in Training
So far the Lebanese I'm working with definitely shows early flowering when root bound.The longer the day hours the slower the flowering.

Not really an auto 'cause you can reveg them if they have not been flowered for weeks past harvest in 12/12 or similar. Chop the top and rootball, replant with fresh soil and give 20hrs of light a day.
 

Rembetis

Well-known member
Strains like Lebanese and Moroccan, Sinai etc from Northern Africa and Asia Minor, grown in soil in their homelands will begin flowering in June. They trigger right after the longest day of the year and respond very quickly to the shorter light cycle. Often within a few days of the summer solstice. So, they are very sensitive to the light cycle, and I think that is where the "semi auto" idea comes from. Its far outside of the norm from what strains most people are growing. These particular strains straddle the line between Sativa and the BLD strains, but you can take advantage of their Sativa characteristics when growing them indoors. As you mentioned, stress from being rootbound can trigger flowering. One technique I use when growing old school landrace Sativas in a tent was a well-timed up potting to trigger flowering which allows me to keep them from becoming monsters in a 4x4 tent Sorry guys, senior moment. Fixed it now
 
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Lebanizer

Well-known member
... They trigger right after the shortest day of the year and respond very quickly to the shorter light cycle. Often within a few days of the summer solstice. So, they are very sensitive to the light cycle, and I think that is where the "semi auto" idea comes from. ...

You probaly meant that they trigger right after the ***longest*** day of the year, right @Rembetis ?
 

revegeta666

Well-known member
This is the plant I was talking about by the way. The cross is zamal x Jamaica.
IMG_20220815_110951.jpg


It's been doing this for 15-20 days. I thought it was going to autoflower and stay small but that's not the case. Not stretching yet, just throwing a lot of pistils but not fully committing to the relationship. That's what I hear about myself pretty often as well so I can't blame her.
 
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