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how to prevent this in the future?

wutwut

Well-known member
Veteran
at first i'm sorry for starting a new thread because of my problem. i'm too lazy to try to find this exact same problem from other threads. i tried it but i just got annoying stress. i think now it's better to ask from people who know more.

so i guess this is some kind of mold. i have never seen it before and that's why i am here. i will get rid of these clones but how to prevent this in the future?

next step is to clean the cloning area with a bleach mixture (5-10%). and second step is to cover top of rockwools.

but what else? should i buy h2o2? or is bleach enough? should i spray my mother plants with something? hmm..?
 

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oldmaninbc

Well-known member
at first i'm sorry for starting a new thread because of my problem. i'm too lazy to try to find this exact same problem from other threads. i tried it but i just got annoying stress. i think now it's better to ask from people who know more.

so i guess this is some kind of mold. i have never seen it before and that's why i am here. i will get rid of these clones but how to prevent this in the future?

next step is to clean the cloning area with a bleach mixture (5-10%). and second step is to cover top of rockwools.

but what else? should i buy h2o2? or is bleach enough? should i spray my mother plants with something? hmm..?
One has to be careful with bleach; you don't want it mixing with other chemicals. Bleach is good for solid surfaces, not especially for porous surfaces. For a porous surface I have used vinegar on mold. Peroxide and tea tree oil work as well.

I killed black mold on my orchid using cinnamon.

You have quite the issue going on; is this the first time this problem has happened?
Was there a change in your growing environment, too much humidity or lack of air exchange?
 

wutwut

Well-known member
Veteran
One has to be careful with bleach; you don't want it mixing with other chemicals. Bleach is good for solid surfaces, not especially for porous surfaces. For a porous surface I have used vinegar on mold. Peroxide and tea tree oil work as well.

I killed black mold on my orchid using cinnamon.

You have quite the issue going on; is this the first time this problem has happened?
Was there a change in your growing environment, too much humidity or lack of air exchange?
thanks for reply. yes i noticed that bleach damaged my growing tent walls a little bit.. it's seems to be strong liquid.

this is first time when i see this happening. i think humidity did raise a little bit from normal levels. also there is barely any air exchange because i use my cabinet as a cloning area. but i have done this already for some years and this is first time when it's happening.. weird.
 

oldmaninbc

Well-known member
thanks for reply. yes i noticed that bleach damaged my growing tent walls a little bit.. it's seems to be strong liquid.

this is first time when i see this happening. i think humidity did raise a little bit from normal levels. also there is barely any air exchange because i use my cabinet as a cloning area. but i have done this already for some years and this is first time when it's happening.. weird.
Oh, I know about doing the same thing over and over and something happens to change the outcome.
Those tiny spores that grow into mold are everywhere. Put them in touch with moisture and you can have a problem.
You want to think about your health around mold, some people are very sensitive to mold.
Dampness and stagnant air, I would be trying to correct that.

I was surprised by the power of cinnamon to kill fugus.
 

Ca++

Well-known member
Hold your breath and back away slowly. Being careful not to disturb the air. Then call Ghostbusters.

There are few fungicides that might save them. But some. I was recently put on to Proplant 722 SL so here's a snippet on that
designed to fight dangerous fungal plant diseases. The agent can be used in the cultivation of ornamental plants, but also vegetables and fruits. Particularly recommended for plant protection against phytophthora, downy mildew and black rot. The product can be used by spraying but also by watering, which is important for young seedlings. Proplant works systemically, penetrates the inside of the plant and protects it from the inside for a long time
Elsewhere, it says 3 weeks. Giving you time to wash down with garden disinfectant perhaps. I use Jayes. It's commonly used for greenhouses and pots. Though if bleach (without thickening) is to hand, then 10% should do both molds and viruses.
H2O2 can be quite useless sometimes. As can alcohols. Neither are reliable enough to be your only cleaner. Not now we are worried about viroids. So if you are stocking up on cleaner, it's worth a trip down the isle. In Walmart.
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
Veteran
The photos above should not be a problem if it is only algae. I've seen algae many times on Grodan cubes and not a problem. The plants were not affected by the green algae.

= Algae - is it a Problem? The green, slimy stuff that grows on top of stone wool is algae. It may be unsightly, but it is not a detriment to your plants. There is a high percentage of air space in stone wool which provides plenty of oxygen to roots, even if the stone wool is covered in algae. Google

Stem mold on the other hand is very harmful. That's why I never take clones from anyone or from anywhere. It's easy to lose a few weeks or months because of a fungus. Start fresh and keep everything clean as you can. No visitors and take only clones from your own sprouted seed plants. Once there's a fungus bloom, "fungicides don't help". Fungicides are mostly used as a preventive and not a fix after an infection.

Apple cider vinegar is commonly used as a natural anti-fungal.
 

Ca++

Well-known member
Once there's a fungus bloom, "fungicides don't help". Fungicides are mostly used as a preventive and not a fix after an infection.
Ideally we would all employ preventative measures. I'm going to guess most of us don't though, and will reach for the fungicide, after we see problems. I'm guilty of this myself. Outdoor I have a proper plan I adhere to, but indoor I don't like to use anything, unless I must. I don't think I would have any problem knocking down some algae with a specific fountain treatment, such as Physan 20 (except for the problem of getting hold of any)

Many of these seem good, then get banned. Hence I don't have much of a preventative maintenance program. Physan 20 is banned, as an example. Organocide seems reasonable, which is a PK complex that later becomes available. I have used it as a contact based knock back, and for it's systemic attributes. It carries instructions for both instances. Prevention and cure.

Mechanical removal after damping with the spray would be useful here. Literally get ya butter knife out, and get the bulk of it off.

I have to be realistic though. There are mother plants here, that produce these again in a couple of weeks. Just get them out of your zip code, and clean the place like @Crooked8 was going to make an inspection :)
 

Crooked8

Well-known member
Mentor
ICMag Donor
Veteran
Ideally we would all employ preventative measures. I'm going to guess most of us don't though, and will reach for the fungicide, after we see problems. I'm guilty of this myself. Outdoor I have a proper plan I adhere to, but indoor I don't like to use anything, unless I must. I don't think I would have any problem knocking down some algae with a specific fountain treatment, such as Physan 20 (except for the problem of getting hold of any)

Many of these seem good, then get banned. Hence I don't have much of a preventative maintenance program. Physan 20 is banned, as an example. Organocide seems reasonable, which is a PK complex that later becomes available. I have used it as a contact based knock back, and for it's systemic attributes. It carries instructions for both instances. Prevention and cure.

Mechanical removal after damping with the spray would be useful here. Literally get ya butter knife out, and get the bulk of it off.

I have to be realistic though. There are mother plants here, that produce these again in a couple of weeks. Just get them out of your zip code, and clean the place like @Crooked8 was going to make an inspection :)

1713335888150.gif
 

Artistick Seeds

Active member
hello, baking soda could be appropriate, in order to regulate the pH of the medium, in order to make it less acidic. Green mosses and saprophytic molds generally grow in acidic and humid environments. You should let the substrate dry, remove the affected parts and water only when the plant needs it. Never keep your substrate soaked. If it's too hot in your grow room, lower the temperature a little.
 

Artistick Seeds

Active member
at first i'm sorry for starting a new thread because of my problem. i'm too lazy to try to find this exact same problem from other threads. i tried it but i just got annoying stress. i think now it's better to ask from people who know more.

so i guess this is some kind of mold. i have never seen it before and that's why i am here. i will get rid of these clones but how to prevent this in the future?

next step is to clean the cloning area with a bleach mixture (5-10%). and second step is to cover top of rockwools.

but what else? should i buy h2o2? or is bleach enough? should i spray my mother plants with something? hmm..?
try 2 tablespoons of baking soda per liter of water
 

Creeperpark

Well-known member
Mentor
Veteran
If you keep the top of the rock wool covered with something it will keep algae down to a minimum. Reflective mylar cut the size of the cube should work fine.

Keep the Wrap On Rockwool CubesMost Rockwool products come wrapped in plastic foil. The foil's function is the same as the walls of a pot. It works to keep the light out and the roots in. It also helps to prevent the growth of algae, which although unpleasant to look at, is relatively harmless. Google
 

TanzanianMagic

Well-known member
Veteran
at first i'm sorry for starting a new thread because of my problem. i'm too lazy to try to find this exact same problem from other threads. i tried it but i just got annoying stress. i think now it's better to ask from people who know more.

so i guess this is some kind of mold. i have never seen it before and that's why i am here. i will get rid of these clones but how to prevent this in the future?

next step is to clean the cloning area with a bleach mixture (5-10%). and second step is to cover top of rockwools.

but what else? should i buy h2o2? or is bleach enough? should i spray my mother plants with something? hmm..?
You can use a couple of drops of either:

- grapefruitseedextract, organic

Which is often used by water companies.

- iodine, organic origin

Iodine also helps with flowering, and boosts the plant's defenses.
 

mudballs

Well-known member
Algea needs phosphates and nitrates and water. You could spray a sealer on top of cubes. Just a spray can of sealer and a coat or two. That way the top or contact point for microorganisms isn't constantly wet.
 
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