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A lil ventilation help please

xet

Well-known member
coolingtubes.png

I added color for scientific effect. 90 feet out warm ... 90 feet return cool, and vice versa in the winter
 

xet

Well-known member
Any industrial grade fan that fits the tube will do the job. Even an old one. A small solar panel could handle the task most of the time. It would really help if your entire floor was about 5 or 10 feet deeper into the ground. If you find 2 helps significantly but isn't quite where you need it, add another, a nice stream of 50-60'F air
 
Any industrial grade fan that fits the tube will do the job. Even an old one. A small solar panel could handle the task most of the time. It would really help if your entire floor was about 5 or 10 feet deeper into the ground. If you find 2 helps significantly but isn't quite where you need it, add another, a nice stream of 50-60'F air
Would it be ok to run the pipes along side the house like this or would they need to go out away ?
 

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xet

Well-known member
but 90 degree angle straight up and nice looking, and along the wall or wherever you like
coolingtubes3.png
 

Three Berries

Well-known member
A lot of the heat would be radiant and moving air does not readily remove that heat. Make sure there are as few dark colored objects to absorb the suns heat.
 

Ca++

Well-known member
What constitutes a wall, in this wall with roof scenario. As walls can have holes in, and still be walls.

If the AC is no use, I'm not sure what use a 200mm pipe of cooler air will be. The temp of which would be the average temp over 24 hours, as that's how hot the ground will get, typically. In dry sand it may do nothing. A moving water table would be nice. Here we have looked at underground lakes as heat batteries for AC. Heating them all summer, to draw back heat in the winter. The ground can't be treated as a continuous heatsink without a bit of investigation. It could be a lot of bother to make a 200mm inlet that's very restrictive for a fan.

Somehow you are allowed fans, which are neither wall nor roof. These regulations need combing through, and legal definitions checking.
You want air in low, which might be a tube system under the wall if the wall must be solid where it exists above ground. Even then, you could have foundations that are passive intakes and unregulated. I'm not convinced by the long pipes, but lots of pipes I like. Maximising air flow, in the bottom, and out the top. That is very important and I'm not sure I am seeing it here. If the inlet fan must be high, then it wants ducting to down low. It shouldn't be blowing in the top, where it would disturb the hottest of air about to be extracted. We want the air to be almost laminar, where it's cool at the bottom for the plants, and hot at the top where it's leaving.

Would it be ridiculous to mylar outside? Paint white? insulate? I just can't see any pics of your build, to really get my thinking cap on.
 
What constitutes a wall, in this wall with roof scenario. As walls can have holes in, and still be walls.

If the AC is no use, I'm not sure what use a 200mm pipe of cooler air will be. The temp of which would be the average temp over 24 hours, as that's how hot the ground will get, typically. In dry sand it may do nothing. A moving water table would be nice. Here we have looked at underground lakes as heat batteries for AC. Heating them all summer, to draw back heat in the winter. The ground can't be treated as a continuous heatsink without a bit of investigation. It could be a lot of bother to make a 200mm inlet that's very restrictive for a fan.

Somehow you are allowed fans, which are neither wall nor roof. These regulations need combing through, and legal definitions checking.
You want air in low, which might be a tube system under the wall if the wall must be solid where it exists above ground. Even then, you could have foundations that are passive intakes and unregulated. I'm not convinced by the long pipes, but lots of pipes I like. Maximising air flow, in the bottom, and out the top. That is very important and I'm not sure I am seeing it here. If the inlet fan must be high, then it wants ducting to down low. It shouldn't be blowing in the top, where it would disturb the hottest of air about to be extracted. We want the air to be almost laminar, where it's cool at the bottom for the plants, and hot at the top where it's leaving.

Would it be ridiculous to mylar outside? Paint white? insulate? I just can't see any pics of your build, to really get my thinking cap on.
I think I have decided to try reversing the intake fan tomorrow and cutting two passive Intake holes down low I will report back with my findings. Todays ambient temp was 72. With the current intake exhaust fan I was able to manage 89 degrees in the greenhouse. Just not acceptable considering average days here are in the 90s
 

Ca++

Well-known member
90? you can't afford any heat increase really. It's going to be hard work. Might need the ac configuring to cool the inlet air, and get it under the plants. If you really struggle anyway..
 
90? you can't afford any heat increase really. It's going to be hard work. Might need the ac configuring to cool the inlet air, and get it under the plants. If you really struggle anyway..
Update got it fixed today and am holding within 3 degrees of ambient. I have swapped the intake fan to exhaust and cut two vents halfway of the house on each side.
 
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