Register ICMag Forum Menu Features Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
You are viewing our:
in:
Forums > Marijuana Growing > Cannabis Harvesting & Processing > Old School Hawaiian Rainforest Guerrilla Harvesting

Thread Title Search
Post Reply
Old School Hawaiian Rainforest Guerrilla Harvesting Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-21-2020, 04:32 AM #1
Lolo94
Member

Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 144
Lolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really nice
Old School Hawaiian Rainforest Guerrilla Harvesting

I am sure there were many ways this was done, but the method I was familiar with was pretty basic. For context, the timeline was over 25 years ago in the rainforest of upper Puna.

Side branches were cut and placed in 3 pli garbage bags with the stems facing up. These bags were the strongest you could find and were doubled. The top foot or so of the garbage bags was rolled so it could be tied to other garbage bags. Garbage bags were placed over the upper back and shoulders for the hike out. Because it was typically raining or the plants were moist, the bags were never completely filled. It was also necessary to rotate or spin the bags while hiking out to keep the buds from being compacted. This step was necessary or else they would never dry right. It also helped because the Uluhe (Hawaiian fern), Hapu'u (tree fern) and other miscellaneous vegetation would catch the outer bag and sometimes cause small tears. This simple step kept the bags from ripping too much. The bags were also rotated to different shoulders to minimize back strain while hiking

Drying was simple. Large fan leaves were trimmed and Branches were hung on a string in a sealed room. A dehumidifier was turned on low setting and branches were dried until they would barely snap. At this stage, the buds were cut off the branches and trimed. There typically wasn't much to trim as the plants were sativa or mostly sativa. The plants most successful in the rainforest environment did not have alot of small leaves and were not indica thick, as those tended to get mold either directly or from grasshoppers eating and pooping on them.

Trimmed buds were vaccuum sealed and stored for several months before opening and smoking. The finished product was typically tobacco consistency.
Lolo94 is offline Quote


2 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-21-2020, 06:29 AM #2
Chi13
Member

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 225
Chi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud ofChi13 has much to be proud of
Interesting. Do people on Hawaii still grow old sativa's in rainforest?

There's a bit of rainforest in my part of the world but I have never contemplated growing there. I'm a bit old for guerilla growing these days.
Chi13 is online now Quote


Old 09-22-2020, 03:41 AM #3
Lolo94
Member

Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 144
Lolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really nice
I am not sure if people are still growing sativas (or mostly sativas) deep in the forest anymore. Times have changed. During the 80's and 90's, Operation Green Harvest was very active, and it took alot more effort to grow reasonable amounts. Now with a medical card, you can put plants out in the wide open.

The key to growing in the forest was finding spots with good air circulation, enough sunlight (direct and indirect) and within close vicinity to tall Ohia trees, but not directly under the drip line. being in close vicinity to the Ohia trees was important for camouflage as it made it harder for the plants to be seen and destroyed (typically sprayed) from the air. Local wildlife, mostly wild pigs but a few times feral bulls (that escaped long ago from the ranches) sometimes made things interesting. Considering that the environment (well over a 100 inches of rain per year) was not ideal, I was always pleasantly surprised with the quality of the harvested plants. They wouldn't win any beauty contests like today's pin up buds, but the high more than made up for it.
A variety of local Puna strains were initially tested (none with fancy names), and the survivors were crossed and used the following year. It was survival of the fittest at its finest. Plants that were thick and fluffy never did well due to rot/mold. The most successful and productive plants were those with very few small leaflets and where the bud calyxes would stack up tightly on one another.
Lolo94 is offline Quote


2 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-22-2020, 06:52 AM #4
TheFlyinHaWyn!
He Who Like To Get High

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 435
TheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the roughTheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the roughTheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the roughTheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the roughTheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the roughTheFlyinHaWyn! is a jewel in the rough
My oldest brother used to grow up Oshiro Road, waaay in the back. Same thing, harvest in trash bags, trim at his house. This was early '80s when i would stay with him as i was a young boy. He told me stories of growing the load in the late '70s, taking it over to Kona and quick drying it on the rocks. They would rent out 3 rooms at Uncle Billy's Kona. ! for party with the tourists, 1 for sleep and the last room would be him and partner's only where they would keep the pakalolo My brother get choke stories about that time, he was a Ganja Farmer!! Good memories, aloha a hui hou
__________________
Hello. I'm a Stoner.
TheFlyinHaWyn! is offline Quote


3 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-22-2020, 03:24 PM #5
prune
Member

Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 730
prune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to beholdprune is a splendid one to behold
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lolo94 View Post
It was survival of the fittest at its finest. Plants that were thick and fluffy never did well due to rot/mold. The most successful and productive plants were those with very few small leaflets and where the bud calyxes would stack up tightly on one another.
So, so much to be read into that one line. I wish a few of the seed "breeders" would take this knowledge to heart and fashion.
prune is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-22-2020, 10:40 PM #6
Lolo94
Member

Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 144
Lolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlyinHaWyn! View Post
My oldest brother used to grow up Oshiro Road, waaay in the back. Same thing, harvest in trash bags, trim at his house. This was early '80s when i would stay with him as i was a young boy. He told me stories of growing the load in the late '70s, taking it over to Kona and quick drying it on the rocks. They would rent out 3 rooms at Uncle Billy's Kona. ! for party with the tourists, 1 for sleep and the last room would be him and partner's only where they would keep the pakalolo My brother get choke stories about that time, he was a Ganja Farmer!! Good memories, aloha a hui hou
Classic story about Uncle Billy's. Stayed there plenty times, when we would paddle on the west side.
Oshiro road was even wetter than the area we used to plant (several miles up the hill.), especially Mauka. I bet your brother's got great stories. I had family that planted in the 70s also, and some of the stories was just nuts. Puna was like the wild wild west back then . I sure do miss talkin' story and rollin some up at the beach with friends and family. Malama Pono HaWyn.
Lolo94 is offline Quote


Old 09-22-2020, 11:12 PM #7
Lolo94
Member

Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 144
Lolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by prune View Post
So, so much to be read into that one line. I wish a few of the seed "breeders" would take this knowledge to heart and fashion.
Unfortunately, it seems like it's too much about looks, and the size of buds nowadays. The easy way around it is vaccum seal or cobb it, then it all looks the same.
I kinda laugh when I hear all the complicated selective breeding tips. Back then, it was simple. Start with alot of seeds (many times more than would be harvested) of as many different types of local strains possible, and let the males lightly pollinate the plants. Seeds of those that did the best were planted the next year. The first season was kind of a crap shoot as far as how many did well, but after that it was easy to see which traits would do the best in that environment.
Lolo94 is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-22-2020, 11:41 PM #8
Donald Mallard
Senior Member


Donald Mallard's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,145
Donald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivor
Did any of the guys dry onsite , or nearby ??

its always easier to carry out dry bud and its not damaged at all that way ..



we used to build a canvas tent in the rain forest and use propane burners to dry the product , did some of the guys where you are also use this method ,
im sure its been thought of before we did it ...
Donald Mallard is online now Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-23-2020, 02:35 AM #9
Lolo94
Member

Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 144
Lolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really niceLolo94 is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald Mallard View Post
Did any of the guys dry onsite , or nearby ??

its always easier to carry out dry bud and its not damaged at all that way ..



we used to build a canvas tent in the rain forest and use propane burners to dry the product , did some of the guys where you are also use this method ,
im sure its been thought of before we did it ...
We never dried onsite. The hike to check on the plants and get back typically took all day. Always just wanted to get in and out.
How long did the drying process take?
Lolo94 is offline Quote


Old 09-23-2020, 09:01 AM #10
Donald Mallard
Senior Member


Donald Mallard's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,145
Donald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivorDonald Mallard is a survivor
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lolo94 View Post
We never dried onsite. The hike to check on the plants and get back typically took all day. Always just wanted to get in and out.
How long did the drying process take?
it really needed a week ,

but was able to be handled in 4-5 days and could be taken home at that point to further dry and trim ,
the 9 kilo gas bottles lasted around 4 days depending on how high you had it burning ,
it took a lot of bottles in and out , some folks wouldnt want to carry those i guess , 22 kilos all up ...



i have carried lots of wet weed prior to that , man thats quite a mission , no envy for folks having to do that uphill like i had too do ,, lol ..
Donald Mallard is online now Quote


Post Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:41 AM.




This site is for educational and entertainment purposes only.
You must be of legal age to view ICmag and participate here.
All postings are the responsibility of their authors.
Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.