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Old 05-13-2015, 08:00 PM #1
Chunk O'Funk
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SST's (Enzyme tea) What seed are you using?

I've been experimenting with different types of seeds for my SST's. So far I've used Wheat berry, Sweet Pea, Alfalfa, Pinto bean, Rye Berry and Corn. All these seeds made great teas and the plants love it everytime. What kind of seeds have you used with great success? I know Barley or Malted Barley seems to be most popular, Just curious!
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Old 05-13-2015, 09:18 PM #2
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Alfalfa, Heirloom Corn and Barley are the only ones I've tried. I would consider that alternating alfalfa and barley with intermittent watering of coconut water/water mixture at a ratio of 1/4 cup C-h20 x gallon H2O if using fresh coconut water.

One of the reasons people use corn instead of (IMO) easier to sprout seeds is because of its high cytokinins. But, the same if not higher levels of cytokinins can be found in coconut water, so it's really a different strokes type deal of getting to the same result.

Alfalfa and barley mix is my preferred for veg. It takes a little planing to get them to sprout at the same time, but combining them gives a rich enzyme profile, PGR's, and the lovely triacontanol. An interesting study for triacontanol can be found here in a 1982 journal of American rhododendron society paper. Granted it's written specifically for its use on rats and rhododendron, its benefits apply to a great deal of flowering plants from cannabis to roses.

Alfalfa SST foliars cut to a ratio of 1 part water to 3 parts SST with an added 1/8t of AgSil 16 and 1/4t of hydrated puree'd kelp can greatly enhance budset, inter-nodal shortening and overall vigor if the plant if applied twice weekly in the first two weeks of flower as the lights go off. Just make sure to not go too far into the budding cycles or go too hard on the kelp as the gibberellins in it and triacontanol in the alfalfa can lead to stretching and foxtailing in otherwise dense structures in sensitive cultivars or if over-applied IME.
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Old 05-13-2015, 09:30 PM #3
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malted barley is the only one ive tried and i'm going to stick with it
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:40 AM #4
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Thanks for the info Polygon, I never thought to mix seeds together for an application. I'm going to try that. I don't use coconut water often so I wonder if it would be beneficial to add corn in the mix to boost cytokinins. I love experimenting with these teas. Do you think twice a week during veg is overkill? I veg for a very long time, if that makes any difference.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:12 AM #5
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I've used alfalfa, barley, and flaxseed. They all work well. I bought some chia seeds but whenever I try to sprout them they turn into gel.
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Old 05-15-2015, 07:39 AM #6
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In veg or in the first 4 or 5 weeks depending on cultivar - once a week is the max I'll do SST soaks
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Old 05-15-2015, 09:53 AM #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polygon View Post
Alfalfa SST foliars cut to a ratio of 1 part water to 3 parts SST with an added 1/8t of AgSil 16 and 1/4t of hydrated puree'd kelp can greatly enhance budset, inter-nodal shortening and overall vigor if the plant if applied twice weekly in the first two weeks of flower as the lights go off. Just make sure to not go too far into the budding cycles or go too hard on the kelp as the gibberellins in it and triacontanol in the alfalfa can lead to stretching and foxtailing in otherwise dense structures in sensitive cultivars or if over-applied IME.
Thanx for the info on your experiences w SST's!
I'm very interested in trying some of these w my upcoming no till tent.
I already love brewing up AACT's for my Dwc and hav seen especially good results using T's as a foliar!!
Wich led me to ask this in another enzime thread.
I figured I'd add it here n see what you all think about foliars of SST?..

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=301163

Here is my post and the reply by the op.
Thanx again all ic is the best!
Big ups, respect, and happy growing!!

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Originally Posted by Heusinomics View Post
I keep hearing a lot about SST's. Esp in place of bottled enzime products.

I hav def heard that the barley can b bad, bc of that possibility of becoming a plant killer(wich seems bad for sure)
Others Iv seen are usein popcorn and alfalfa seeds...
But I swear I read that corn can b bad too, not sure if popcorn is that dif or what.
In addition I hav also seen dried malted barley used in place of fresh sprout...
So it seems that there are many dif methods floating around out there.

Everyone who I hav written or spoke to me about the sst they use are over the moon excited about the results they get, so I gotta figure there is something good going on in throes sprouts! So I'm excited to find a place for this tek in my tea brewing rutine.
My first Q is weather these zimes have any benifet to foliar applications?
As this is my fav reason to brew teas!..

The second Q is wether the enzymes are intended for old/dead root breakdown in the media?
Or are they GROTH PROMOTING properties for the plant?

And thanks for asking such a great Q to get the discussion going!
It's tea time somware let's set down and share ;D

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Im going to do my best to answer your questions but the science of it all is over my head to be quite honest with you. I simply take the advice of a crazy old Coot from another forum. (wink wink to those who can guess who I'm talking about). I've been having great results as well as plenty of others that I know of.

The way I understand it is when a seed sprouts a ton of enzymes are produced or released...not really sure. Those enzymes act to break down organic matter The interesting part is that each type of enzyme breaks down something different. For example, Chitinase specifically breaks down chitin. Since these enzymes break down organic matter it's not advised to be used as a foliar. As far as what grain you use it doesn't really matter. Malted barley is great because it's cheap, convenient, readily available, and the brewing industry is huge so there is a lot of effort put into their malting process to achieve the highest enzyme levels possible (enzymes play a big part in beer brewing). I also use malted corn. Corn contains high levels of cytokins which a lot of people use coconut water for (coconuts are just big seeds...think about that for a min).


The only dangers I've found is if you brew too long you run the risk of fermenting and creating acetic acid. Don't worry about it, I just try not to go over 4 hours with a commercial 1 pump in a 5 gallon bucket. Sometimes I'll only bubble it for 20 or 30 minutes if that's all my schedule allows. I've heard of a lot of people going 24 hours but I dont.

Mr Roseberry

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Old 05-15-2015, 12:28 PM #8
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So far I've been using a barley/wheat mix for SSTs. I know barley is good, but I'm not sure about wheat. I'm only using it because they are already mixed together to feed our chickens and I don't have time to sit and seperate the barley from the wheat. Anyway I've made and applied 3 or 4 brews with no obvious ill effects yet so I guess wheat is at worst benign.

I wanted to try corn/maize to but the only organic corn I've been able to get round here is animal feed and a lot of the grains are cracked or damaged in some way so I'm not getting a great germination rate and it's awfully slow to sprout. Can't get coconut water round here, so as far as I know corn is my only option for cytokinins.

I saw a video of someone making a sst from lentils for auxins. I didn't try it yet, but did anyone else? I suppose all kinds of pulses could be used. Huge asturian faba beans could be interesting.
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Old 05-15-2015, 07:10 PM #9
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Barley is the most standard as it is easy to come by, easy to sprout, better researched (comparatively) and cheap as dirt.

@the english cut - If you cannot get coconut water locally, I'd suggest ordering freeze-dried coconut water powder. It contains the same benefits and is cheap as all hell. Just use it at a rate of 1 Tablespoon per 5 gallons of water. Auxins are all fine and dandy, but from what I understand, kelp meal gives a very high amount and you can avoid the sprouting of lentils and use them for soup. I'd be interested to see what the results are!

if one dilutes and alfalfa SST, they can see the effect of triacontanol which is most effective when applied directly to the meristem, but yes, too much SST can really fuck a plants leaves up like they've been burnt or crisped.
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Old 05-27-2015, 08:55 PM #10
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Is there any other benefit of using corn sprouts other than the cytokinins? Can coconut completely replace corn sprouts?
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