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Old 09-12-2011, 01:43 AM   #1
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Making a PGR Regimen for Medical Marijuana

The goal behind this thread is the create the best Plant Growth Regulator (PGR) regimen for my garden with the limited scientific prowess and knowledge i posses. Im going to attempt to keep it as simple as possible while also being scientific with my regimen building. The plan with each individual PGR is to start off with experiments to find optimum dosages for cannabis. Once the optimum dosage is quantified for the PGR, hopefully i add it to the regimen and then move on to the next PGR. I will not be testing PGR's that have potential toxicity issues. Some examples of these potentially toxic PGR's are the entire of PGR sub-class called the Growth Retardants (Paclobutrazol, Daminozide, Chlormequat Chloride etc).

I have many people to thank for the information that i have obtained. Thank you Spurr, OsWiZzLe/Storm Shadow, OldMan&theWeed and others for your knowledge and shared experience in the subject of medical marijuana friendly PGR's.

I will continue to update this post as experimentation continues.

Complications with Experimenting with Methyl DihydroJasomonate:
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...30&postcount=9
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...9&postcount=15

Triacontanol
Experiment
:
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...5&postcount=19

Triacontanol Experiment Results:
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...1&postcount=30

24-Epibrassinolide
Experiment:
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...7&postcount=35
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...3&postcount=37

24-Epibrassinolide Experiment Results:
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...1&postcount=49
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:11 AM   #2
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one of the first two experiments i will be doing will be involving Triacontanol.

Here's some useful PDF's on triacontanol for anyone who has an interest in the subject. I have at least 2 dozen more studies on TRIA, at least 5 just on micro-propagation. I can upload more if anyone requests.

Quote:
Effect of Triacontanol on photosynthesis, alkaloid content and growth in opium poppy (Papaver Somniferum L.)
N .K. SRIVASTAVA & SRIKANT SHARMA

The influence of different foliar applications of Triacontanol (Tria .) on growth, CO2 exchange, capsule development and alkaloid accumulation in opium poppy was studied in2 glasshouse conditions. Plant height, capsule number and weight, morphine content, CO exchange rate, total chlorophyll and fresh and dry weight of the shoot were significantly maximum at 0.01 mg/1 Tria. At the highest concentration (4mg/1) total chlorophyll, CO2 exchange rate and plant height were significantly inhibited. Thebaine and codeine contents remained unaffected at all the concentrations. The concentration of Fe, Mn, Cu in shoots were maximum at .01 and Zn at 0.1 mg/l Tria. Increase in shoot weight, leaf area ratio and chlorophyll content were significantly correlated with morphine content.
Quote:
Growth Responses of Rice Seedlings to Triacontanol in Light and Dark
S.K. Ries and Violet Wert

Triacontanol, a 30-carbon primary alcohol, applied in nutrient culture solutions to rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings at 2.3 x 10-SM (10 gg/1), caused an increase in dry weight and leaf area of the whole plants. The response could be observed as early as 3 h of treatment. It was observed at relatively high and low light intensities as well as in the dark where control plants lost but triacontanol-treated plants gained in dry weight. The dry weight gain in the dark was, however, eliminated by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Triacontanol-treated plants also in- creased their content of Kjeldahl-N and contained 30% more total N per plant than controls after 6h in the dark.
Quote:
The effects of triacontanol ‘TRIA’ and Asahi SL on the development and metabolic activity of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) plants treated with chilling
Edward Borowski, Zbyszek K. Blamowski

In a potted experiment the influence of foliar application of triacontanol (TRIA) at the concentrations of 0.01; 0.10; 1.00 mg dm-3, and Asahi SL at the concentrations of 0.1; 0.2; 0.3% on the growth and yielding of plants was studied. Electrolyte leakage, water saturation deficit, contents of proline and chlorophyll a + b in leaves, as well as the maximum quantum efficiency of chlorophyll (Fv/Fm) and gas exchange in plants which were treated for five days in temperatures of 15/7°C (day/night) were also examined.
The achieved results showed that periodic chilling decreased the value of all the analysed parameters of the plants to a significant degree, with the exception of electrolyte leakage, water saturation deficit and proline content, whose values under these conditions increased. Triacontanol and Asahi SL favourably influenced both the plants treated and not treated with periodic chilling, but the effect of biostimulators on plants treated with chilling stress was clearly higher. The negative influence of chilling on the plants of Ocimum basilicum L. was decreased by TRIA in the concentration 0.10 mg dm-3, and by Asahi SL in the concentration of 0.2 and 0.3%.
Quote:
Triacontanol-Induced Changes in the Growth, Photosynthetic Pigments, Cell Metabolites, Flowering and Yield of Green Gram
G. Kumaravelu, V. David Livingstone and M.P. Ramanujam

Seedlings of green gram [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilezek] cultivar KM-2 were sprayed with different concentrations of triacontanol (TRIA) (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg dm-3) at 15 and 25 days after sowing. Foliar spray of 0.5 mg dm-3 TRIA significantly promoted the plant height, fresh mass, and contents of chlorophylls, saccharides, starch, soluble proteins, amino acid and phenols. Leaf nitrate content was reduced by 0.5 and 1.0 mg dm-3 TRIA with a corresponding increase in nitrate reductase activity. TRIA of 0.5 mg dm-3 stimulated the onset of flowering, pod production and retention, but less number of pods and seeds per plant were observed at 2.0 mg dm-3 treatment.
Quote:
Triacontanol-mediated regulation of growth and other physiological attributes, active constituents and yield of Mentha arvensis L.
M. Naeem, M. Masroor A. Khan, Moinuddin, Mohd. Idrees, Tariq Aftab

Triacontanol (TRIA) has been realized as a potent plant growth promoting substance for a number of agricultural and horticultural crops. Out of a large number of essential oil bearing plants, mint (Mentha arvensis L.) constitutes the most important source of therapeutic agents used in the alternative systems of medicine. The mint plant has marvelous medicinal properties. In view of enhancing growth, yield and quality of this medicinally important plant, a pot experiment was conducted according to simple randomized block design. The experiment was aimed at studying the effect of four concentrations of TRIA (10-0, 10-7, 10-6 and 10-5 M) on the performance of mint with regard to growth and other physiological attributes, crop yield and quality attributes and the yield and contents of active constituents of the plant. The growth and other physiological parameters as well as yield and quality attributes were studied at 100 and 120 DAP. The foliar application of TRIA at 10-6 M concentration significantly enhanced most of the growth and other physiological attributes, crop herbage yield and the yield and content of active constituents (menthol, L-methone, isomenthone and menthyl acetate) of mint at both the stages. However, the next higher concentration of TRIA (10-5 M) exhibited slightly negative effect and did not further increase the values of the attributes studied, but it proved significantly better than the control. Application of TRIA significantly enhanced the yield and content of all the active constituents determined by GLC technique.
Quote:
Yield of tomato and maize in response to foliar and root applications of triacontanol
A.B. ERIKSEN, M.K. HAUGSTAD and S. NILSEN

Triacontanol applied to tomato plants as a foliar spray caused a significant increase in total yield and yield per plant. When triacontantol was added to the growth medium, only a temporary increase in yield and number of fruits was observed. The yield of maize was unaffected by triacontanol, either applied to the leaves or to the growth substrate. These results support an earlier observation that a reduction in photo- respiration is involved in the regulatory function of triacontanol, since only the yield of tomato, a C, plant, was increased . The application method was an important factor in it's effectiveness.
Quote:
APPLICATION OF METHODS SUITABLE FOR IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF IN VITRO PROPAGATION ON HORTICULTURAL PLANTS
DR. ANNAMARIA MÉSZÁROS

The term micropropagation means a technological process consisting of several steps in order to produce numerous propagula from a chosen mother plant under in vitro conditions. Large scale technologies have been developed following long experimental procedures worldwide. In the period of 1970-1980 research was focused onto the methodology of steril culturing, and the propagation of economically important plant species. Trials with different nutrient media, investigation on growth regulator effects, experiments concerning interaction of genotype and environmental effects – some of the most important topics at this period. From the beginning of the nineties attention was payed to new technologies, scale-up and automatization. It can be stated that in this field of science theory and practice forms a strong unity, both in improving the knowledge and in developing new technologies.
Quote:
Effect of triacontanol on the lipid composition of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaves and its interaction with indole-3-acetic acid and benzyladenine
V . Shripathi & G. Sivakumar Swamy

Application of triacontanol (TRIA), a long chain aliphatic alcohol (C-30), to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L .) leaves resulted in an increase in dry weight and an alteration in lipid composition . A significant increase in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) was attained 24h after TRIA treatment. However, no significant change in any of the individual phospholipids was observed. Ben- zyladenine (BA) treatment increased only phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels without having any effect on either glycolipids or other phospholipids. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) initiated no significant change in the lipid composition. Combined treatment with TRIA and BA resulted in an increase of MGDG, DGDG and PC, indicating that the individual effects of these two growth regulators were not altered .
The combined treatment of IAA and TRIA did not bring about any change in the levels of MGDG and DGDG indicating that the effect of TRIA was nullified by IAA.MDGD is known to be involved in the packaging of photosystem I proteins . Whether TRIA-induced increase in dry weight which is due to the enhanced photosynthetic rate, is related to increased MGDG levels is not yet discernible.
Quote:
Effect of Foliar Application of Growth Regulators on Physiological and Biochemical Attributes, Grain Yield and Quality in Pearl Millet
R Sivakumar, G Pathmanaban and S Nithila

Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] is a staple food crop of the tropical and subtropical regions whose productivity is low when compared to the other cereal crops. To improve this situation, researchers might explore the use of plant growth regulators, which are known to play a positive role in enhancing qualitative and quantitative characters in plants. Brassinosteroids in particular are known to regulate several physiological functions like cell division, cell elongation, synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins and enhancement of yield in cereals and vegetables. Against this background, a study was initiated to examine the effect of foliar application of growth regulators on physiological and biochemical parameters, grain yield and quality of pearl millet.
Quote:
Yield Parameters Responses in a Spreading (cv. M-13) and Semi-Spreading (cv. Girnar-2) Types of Groundnut to Six Growth Regulators
Aman Verma, C.P. Malik, Y.K. Sinsinwar and V.K. Gupta

Plants of spreading (cv. M-13) and semi-spreading (cv. Girnar-2) type 3 of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) were foliar sprayed separately with different plant growth regulators (PGRs) e.g. Brassinolides (250 ppm), ethephon (250 ppm), Planofix (Naphthyl Acetic Acid; NAA; 50 ppm); Triacontanol (10 ppm), Cytozyme (Gibberellic acid (GA), 100 ppm), Bioenzyme (1000 ppm) and surfactant. The spraying was done in the evening on the plants 35 and 45 days after sowing (DAS). Several yield parameters e.g. pod yield (kg/ha), haulm yield (kg/ha), number of pods per plant, pod weight per plant (g), shelling percentage, test weight (g) and mature kernel weight (g) were analyzed and compared with controls (water sprayed). Some of the PGRs (Brassinolides, triacontanol, GA, NAA) were effective in inducing enhanced pod yield, number of pods per plant, pod weight per plant and shelling percentage significantly. In the plants treated with triacontanol and GA, the total number of flowers produced per plant was increased; however, the number of days required for the production of 100 flowers, was decreased. PGRs used presently stimulated many of the kernel and pod parameters. The increase in weight of kernels could be attributed to efficient mobilization of assimilates for an extended period of filling of pods.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Effect of Triacontanol on photosynthesis, alkaloid content and growth in opium poppy (Papaver So.pdf (281.6 KB, 30 views)
File Type: pdf Growth Responses of Rice Seedlings to Triacontanol in Light and Dark.pdf (560.4 KB, 12 views)
File Type: pdf The effects of triacontanol ‘TRIA’ and Asahi SL on the development and metabolic activity of swe.pdf (170.6 KB, 10 views)
File Type: pdf Triacontanol-induced changes in the growth, photosynthetic pigments, cell metabolites, flowering.pdf (264.9 KB, 12 views)
File Type: pdf Triacontanol-mediated regulation of growth and other physiological attributes, active constituen.pdf (365.5 KB, 9 views)
File Type: pdf Yield of tomato and maize in response to foliar and root applications of triacontanol.pdf (188.6 KB, 13 views)
File Type: pdf APPLICATION OF METHODS SUITABLE FOR IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF IN VITRO PROPAGATION ON HORTICUL.pdf (237.7 KB, 12 views)
File Type: pdf Effect of triacontanol on the lipid composition of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaves and its.pdf (415.6 KB, 13 views)
File Type: pdf Effect of Foliar Application of Growth Regulators on Physiological and Biochemical Attributes, G.pdf (203.3 KB, 14 views)
File Type: pdf Yield Parameters Responses in a Spreading (cv. M-13) and Semi-Spreading (cv. Girnar-2) Types of .pdf (31.6 KB, 11 views)
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:16 AM   #3
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TRIACONTANOL INDUCED CHANGES IN GROWTH, YIELD AND QUALITY OF TOMATO(slighly abridged)

ABSTRACT
A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of foliar spray of plant growth regulator triacontanol – a naturally occurring long-chain aliphatic alcohol – on growth, yield and quality parameters of two varieties (Hyb-SC-3 and Hyb-Himalata) of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill). Plants were sprayed twice with 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 ppm aqueous triacontanol. Increasing levels of the growth regulator up to 1.00 ppm enhanced most parameters, including fruit yield, particularly of Hyb-SC-3. Surprisingly, beta-carotene and lycopene contents were also increased by triacontanol application, although it was expected that both should show inverse relationship as the former comes in the downstream of the later in their biosynthetic pathway. However, ascorbic acid was not affected by the spray of triacontanol.


INTRODUCTION
Triacontanol [CH3 (CH2)28 CH2OH] is a straight chain fatty alcohol of 30 carbon atoms and has been recognized as prominent chemical for plant growth promotion of many agricultural and horticultural crops [32-26]. It exists as constituent of cuticular waxes (16). It has great stimulatory effect on various processes including growth [32-2925-1-14-22-37-19], protein content [11-13-39-40-20]. Triacontanol is a natural growth promotant and has been shown to enhance growth rates and yield of many crops. Triacontanol improved the rate and extent of plants growth. It also stimulates photosynthesis and several enzyme activities [10]. Triacontanol also increase dry weight, carbon dioxide fixation, reducing sugars and free amino acids leading to the enhancement of plant growth and crop yield [27-36].
Keeping the stimulatory effect on various characteristics in view, it was decided to study the effect of triacontanol spray on performance of two varieties of tomato.
A pot experiment was conducted on two cultivars, namely, Hyb-SC-3 (C1) and Hyb-Himalata (C2) of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) in a net house of the Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of foliar spray of five aqueous concentrations of triacontanol (0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 2.0 ppm) on response of two cultivars of tomato. The above varieties were selected on the basis of a screening test performed earlier at Aligarh [15]. The earthen pots (25 cm diameter) were filled with 4 kg homogenous mixture (3:1) of soil and cowdung manure. The soil was analysed for various characteristics (texture-sandy loam, pH (1:2)-7.5; E.C. (1.2)- 1.0 dS m-1, available N-238.2 kg ha-1, P-12 kg ha-1 and K-377kg ha-1. The seeds obtained from the Sungro Seed Company, New Delhi, were sterilized in ethyl alcohol for half an hour and then washed and soaked in double distilled water for 12 hrs before sowing. The four-week old seedlings were transplanted into the pots at the rate of one plant per pot. The pots were watered as and when required. Triacontanol treatments were applied six and eight weeks after transplanting. At the time of fruit development, the plants were supported by sticks (stacks). At harvest fresh weight of shoot plant-1, fresh weight of root plant-1, dry weight of shoot plant-1, dry weight root plant-1, fruits plant-1, weight fruit-1and fruit yield plant-1. Fruit lycopene, beta-carotene and ascorbic acid content were measured at 503, 436 and 540 nm respectively using spectrophotometer by the method described by Sadasivam and Manickam [34]. The data were analyzed statistically
Fig.3: Effect of triacontanol on fruit yield, lycopene, beta-carotene and ascorbic acid contents in fruits of two varieties of tomato.


RESULTS
Cultivars differences and effect of triacontanol and their interaction were found to be significant on most of the parameters studied (Fig. 2& 3). The details are as follows.

Fresh weight of shoot plant-1: C1 gave higher value than that of C2 spray of triacontanol at 2.00 ppm gave the maximum fresh weight and 0 ppm (control), the minimum value. Among the interactions, C2 x 1.00 ppm gave the highest value while C2 x 0.5 ppm the minimum value.

Fresh weight of root plant-1: C1 gave higher value than that of C2 triacontanol at 1.00 ppm gave the highest value and 0 ppm the minimum. C1 x 2.00 ppm gave the highest value while C2 x 0.25 ppm the minimum.

Dry weight of shoot plan-1: C1 gave higher dry weight than C2. Among the treatments, 1.00 ppm gave the highest value while 0 ppm, the minimum value. C1 x 0.25 ppm combination gave maximum dry weight.

Dry weight of root plant-1: Like fresh weight, dry weight of root given by C1 was higher than that of C2. Concentration 1.00 ppm gave higher value while 0 ppm the minimum. C1 x 1.00 ppm gave maximum dry weight. The value was at par with that of C1 x 2.00 ppm, C1 x 0.50, and C2 x 1.00 ppm.

Fruits plant-1: Like other parameters, C1 gave higher value than C2. Spray of triacontanol at 1.00 ppm gave maximum value and 0 ppm the minimum. However, the value of 2.00 ppm was statistically equal with that of 1.00 ppm,. Among the interactions, C1 x 2.00 ppm, C1 x 1.00 ppm and C1 x 0.50 ppm gave being at par the highest value.

Weight plant-1: C1 produced heavier fruits than C2. Among the treatments, 1.00 ppm gave the maximum value while 0 ppm the minimum. C1 x 1.00 ppm gave the maximum value however; C2 x 0.50 gave minimum value.

Fruit yield plant-1: C1 gave higher yield than C2. Among the treatments,1.00 ppm equaled by 2.00 ppm gave maximum yield of tomato and 0 ppm gave minimum value. Interaction C1 x 1.00 ppm, equaled by C1x 2.00 ppm, gave maximum fruit yield. The lowest yield was produced by C2 x 0 ppm. C1 x 1.00 gave 24 % higher yield than C1 x 0 ppm.

Lycopene contents in fruits: The content was higher in C1 than C2. Among the treatments, 1.00 ppm gave maximum value. However, the value was at par with that of 2.00 ppm. The control gave minimum value. Interaction C1 x 1.00 ppm, equaled by C1 x 2.00 ppm, C2 x 2.00 ppm, C2 x 1.00 ppm and C1 x 0.5 ppm gave maximum lycopene content. C2 x 0 ppm gave minimum content.

Beta-carotene content in fruits: Beta-carotene content was at par in both cultivars. Out of different doses of triacontanol, 1.00 ppm gave maximum value which was at par with 0.50 and 2.00 ppm. Among the interactions, C2 x 1.00 ppm equaled by C1 x 1.00 ppm, C2 x 0.5 ppm, C1 x 0.5 ppm, C2 x 2.00 ppm and C1 x 2.00 ppm highest content gave higher content than other interactions were at par themselves.

Ascorbic acid content: No significant cultivars differences and treatment and interactions effect on the ascorbic acid content were noted.


DISCUSSION
The growth promoting effect of triacontanol on the whole plant specially the fresh and dry weight has been established in a variety of plants including tomatoes by [23-2-17-13-38-27-31-18-5-3-12-24-28-35- 32]. Our finding that 1.00 ppm of triacontanol increased the biomass production of tomato is in accordance of the above reports. The increased in dry weight accumulation of the plant with foliar application of triacontanol suggests that it is involve in growth parameters and photosynthesis [5-8-9-19- 37]. All these findings support the results of this work that show the gradual increase of biomass production by the gradual increase of levels of triacontanol. On the other hand, triacontanol also enhanced not only the number of fruits but weight per fruit that indicate it increased the flowering as well as heaviness as there would be more partitioning of photosynthates to the developing sink. Several workers have reported boosted yield by triacontanol application on tomato [4-13-38-21] and other plants [7-22-19- 25-30-1-32-28]. Lycopene and beta-carotene are tetraterpenoids, derived from isoprenes [33] are very similar structure (Fig1). They should show a little different response to triacontanol as beta-carotene is in downstream of lycopene in the biosynthetic pathway. The effect of triacontanol was insignificant on ascorbic acid content. This finding is in accordance with the findings of Hashim and Lundergan [7].


CONCLUSION
Thus, triacontanol may be used as growth, yield and quality promotion of tomato. According to this experiment, variety Hyb-SC-3 (C1) proved better and may be adopted and be sprayed with 1.00 ppm triacontanol for best yield and quality.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 010542006.pdf (148.5 KB, 26 views)
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:26 AM   #4
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based on the results of the triacontanol test on the 2 different varieties of tomatoes and a friendly warning on Spurrs part about >1ppm triacontanol concentrations and stretch, i have decided to make the concentrations of triacontanol for my test groups such: 0.0ppm (control), .25ppm, .50ppm, .75ppm and 1.0ppm. i will be using polysorbate 20 although it is not required when using NST

i will be spraying between 1 and 2 weeks after transplant and will continue to apply every 14 days stopping before day 15 of flower. i might take 1 plant from each test group and give one more application during peak bud production (around day 30)

Last edited by dizzlekush; 09-22-2011 at 01:05 AM.. Reason: change in test parameters
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Old 09-12-2011, 03:18 AM   #5
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the 2nd PGR i will be testing is methyl dihydrojasomonate. there isn't much research on the chemical, and absolutely no proof of its effectiveness but i will be using it anyways since it the most easily obtainable and usable jasmonic acid that i could find.

the MDHJ will be applied one time only once bud production seems to have drastically declined
i will be using 4 different groups: 1 control and 3 tests. the levels of MDHJ the groups will be tested at are: 0ppm, 30ppm, 60ppm, and 90ppm (and most likely one plant at 120ppm).
each plant in this test has already been sprayed with .5ppm of triacontanol once around day 30 of bloom and will not be taking part in the triacontanol dosage experiment.

Spurr has already compiled a top notch list of jasmonic acid scientific articles.
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...3&postcount=54

Last edited by dizzlekush; 09-12-2011 at 04:02 AM..
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Old 09-12-2011, 04:28 AM   #6
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Was just reading through spurrs articles yesterday. I find this type of experimenting very interesting, but i'm still kinda on the fence about playing around with such things. Mostly just due to my somewhat irrational fear of things I don't yet fully understand. Keep us updated on your findings. I will be doing further study myself when time permits, just have a few to many irons in the fire right now to fully dive into this one. Welcome to ICmag by the way.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:53 AM   #7
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Gogogo ! Always interested in marihuana testing !
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:12 PM   #8
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great idea. i have used tria as directed by a rose grower friend. not mdhj. wanna try some jazz rose spray soon. this should be a great experiment
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:18 PM   #9
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dam it all. went to water last night in the bloom room and found spider mites. if i ever found out one thing about spider mites, its DO NOT WAIT. so to not have a giant harvest of unsmokable buds i decided to tackle this the 'natural' way, which meant scrapping the Methyl DihydroJasmonate dosage experiment. it was too late in bloom to give them multiple sprays and since jasmonic acids have shown to weaken foliage feeding insects like mites i decided to make the MDHJ a part of the treatment.

the treatment was:
945ml distilled water
20ml rosemary oil
10ml neem oil
17ml Monterey Garden Insect Spray (spinosad)
3.3ml JAZ Rose spray (full dose, 107 ppm MDHJ)
5ml polysorbate 20

i treated half the plants in the garden with that concentrate and sprayed another quarter of the garden with the same thing but the MDHJ halved (53.5ppm) and the last quarter had a decent amount of room and treated plants between it and the infected plants. 2 plants were heavily infected. i chopped the weaker and most infected one down, and removed the remaining one and another more infected one from the garden. every plant around the outbreak has been given adequate room in between each other to slow down transfer.
so the MDHJ dosage experiment is half butchered. half the garden got sprayed with 107ppm, a quarter got 53.5, and the last quarter got none (control). but each dosage of MDHJ was also mixed in with several other products, none of which i have ever sprayed this late in bloom. so some stressing or stomata clogging or some factor is likely to stray the results from that of a pure MDHJ test.
if this doesn't kill the spider mites... im pretty much giving up on a 'natural' way to kill these little bastads.
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:26 PM   #10
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but on a lighter side of experiment news, the first part of the Triacontanol dosage experiment kicked off yesterday. the 80 plant garden that is not maintained/owned by me got its first dosage. since i left the concentrations to be tested in the choice of the growers, they decided on testing 0.0ppm, .25ppm, .50ppm, and .75ppm. i actually almost like this more than an exact copy of my experiment (only difference being they decided to switch my 1.0ppm dosage to .75ppm). these growers are slight copycats of mine and therefore use the same nutrients i use and are now growing the same strain as me. so multiple parameters of the test that would normally be varied will have some consistency.
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Old 09-21-2011, 09:50 PM   #11
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well more good news and bad news just in case anyone's actually reading this.

the mix of rosemary oil, neem oil, and spinosad proved to be very effective at killing the mites. i took the most infested leaves from the most infested plants and examined them under 15X magnification and stopped counting at 50 dead and 0 living. did a quick sweep through on the other plants and all the same thing. i reapplied 3 days after the first application and ill apply once more in 3 more days.

unfortunately the TRIA dosage study that wasn't under my control got botched. i did not label each individual plants dosage since the plants were conveniently spread evenly across 4 different tables, so each table housed a different test group. unfortunately the growers decided to move the plants around and knowingly destroyed the experiment, even after i expressed my willingness to label each pot if necessary. so now that they got their free dose of TRIA, they can go f**k themselves and ill keep the PGR's to myself from now on.

my vegetative plants are one week old now. in a few more days i'll start the TRIA dosage experiment on my own plants. i did like the linear doses of .25ppm, .50ppm, and .75ppm a bit more than the exponential .25, .50, 1.0 after a bit of thought.... too many doses, too few test groups.

Im having an overlapping experiment involving different types of soilless mediums in the TRIA experiment. i have 60 plants, 20 in coco, 20 in peat, and 20 in 50/50. The plan was to have 4 TRIA test groups and borrow 5 plants from each medium test group to make 4 TRIA test groups of 15, but ive decided to test 5 TRIA doses now. so i will be borrowing 4 plants from each medium test group to make 5 TRIA test groups of 12. the 5 concentrations of TRIA in the test group will be: 0.0ppm, .25ppm, .50ppm, .75ppm, and 1.0ppm. there will be 12 plants in each test group, 4 in coco, 4 in peat, and 4 in 50/50.

Last edited by dizzlekush; 09-22-2011 at 12:56 AM.. Reason: change in test parameters
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Old 09-22-2011, 08:49 PM   #12
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thanks for taking the time to post all this so far a good read, about the mites the spinosad all by itself is a very effective for controlling spider mites if you mix it with yucca juice (surfactant) it will be even more effective
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Old 09-23-2011, 10:23 PM   #13
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cool thread - stoked to see others foolin around with some pgr's. lots of good info in here, appreciate you detailing the step by step too. feels like a nice bridge from the science world to the practical application, something i know many struggle with.

looking forward to hearing your results.

post script - also curious on your feelings about GA3 being used in combo with tria. i dont have a membership so i couldnt read the article you posted but it seemed promising from the abstract and i feel like someone has mentioned using the 2 in conjunction before. can you elaborate at all/ do you have plans on testing them together? thanks again!
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IMO View Post
also curious on your feelings about GA3 being used in combo with tria. i dont have a membership so i couldnt read the article you posted but it seemed promising from the abstract and i feel like someone has mentioned using the 2 in conjunction before. can you elaborate at all/ do you have plans on testing them together? thanks again!
im a non member as well so i know no more than the abstract. GA3 and all other gibberellins are to be taken with extreme caution when trying to grow "buds" with cannabis. GA3 specifically has shown to have significant synergistic effects with both Triacontanol and Methyl Jasmonate (and hopefully MDHJ), but has the uncanny ability to create nightmarish stretch. that and the delicate dance of getting the ppm of both the TRIA/JA and the GA3 just right to create effects beyond standalone TRIA/JA treatment without adverse effects is a daunting task for the hobby level botanist like myself.
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Old 09-24-2011, 12:05 AM   #15
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Complications in testing MDHJ

the exact mechanics behind exogenous MDHJ applications and increased trichome production/density is as far as im aware a bit unknown. Since MDHJ and MeJA are both ester forms of Jasmonic Acids, insuring that separate MDHJ or MeJA test groups dpn't adulterate each other will prove to be difficult. once one plant is sprayed with jasmonate esters, the plant itself basically becomes its own jasmonate factory and delivery system, slowly making and releasing MeJA, which in turn effects surrounding plants in the same way the original plant was effected (most likely to a lesser degree but still enough to skew test results)

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...2&postcount=46
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.ph...8&postcount=22

A while back Spurr messaged me asking how i was going to take my measurements so i could properly quantify the increased trichome density from my MDHJ applications. IIRC he suggested counting individual trichomes per mm^2 to quantify increased trichome density, and me not having the ability to measure square millimeters resolved to judging whichever buds where 'frostier' to get my results. but it turns out that there is a level of frostieness (and i have now achieved it) that makes it dam near impossible to tell which buds have more trichomes (even with your average 10-80X dope scope). the strain i am growing is an unusually low yielding/ high quality genetic that is in all honesty not the best strain to test products for increasing trichome density, having such a large amount of trichomes anyways. so i can only tell that both 53.5 ppm and 107ppm of MDHJ are very effective at increasing trichome density with zero foxtailing, leafburn, or chlorosis. if i had a more homogeneous test group it would be beneficial to see if the MDHJ had any negative effect on yield by weighing dry yield of test groups against control groups.

so to put it simply, ive proven to myself at least the effectiveness of MDHJ, but am lost at how to find the best application rate. a different tent or room for each control group, # of trichomes/mm^2 to quantify trichome density, and like all proper tests require, a homogeneous test group to quantify any inverse effects on yield are all the parameters i need to be able to get some usabe results. unfortunately i can not match all those parameters needed to get a proper test, so im stuck with simply knowing that MDHJ does increase trichome production.

So the MDHJ dosage experiment has been put to an end, for now. On with Triacontanol.
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