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Old 03-14-2018, 03:27 AM #1
Tiresmoke19
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Winter rye cover crop

So I've been thinking about months away From now when the tree leaves begin to drop and we near harvest our bud.... in my area the dark green canibis will really contrast with typical fall colors.

Winter rye or known as winter wheat stays bright green through winter. Anyone try blending themselves in with it? It's very cheap and grows by just tossing seed around. Looks like a normal grass to most. It would require planting about the time plants start to flower, not at initial planting of mj.

It would then be a fantastic mulch or thatch the next year.

Thoughts?
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Old 03-14-2018, 03:37 AM #2
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I planted some winter rye along with red clover last Fall and the rye came up within a week of planting.

Can wait to see how it does once the snow melts.
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Old 03-14-2018, 02:19 PM #3
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one of the overlooked .....green manure crops......

best in growth.......
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Old 03-14-2018, 03:12 PM #4
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Only downfall I see is the rye eating up all the nitrogen, you guys have any issues with that? Mixing with red clover would be good to fixate free nitrogen from atmosphere but clover grows so slow
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:41 PM #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troutman View Post
I planted some winter rye along with red clover last Fall and the rye came up within a week of planting.

Can wait to see how it does once the snow melts.
Nice rabbit and deer food. Should distract them from your plants. They love the shoots.

I'm putting clover and Buckwheat (for pest prevention) May 1st.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiresmoke19 View Post
Only downfall I see is the rye eating up all the nitrogen, you guys have any issues with that? Mixing with red clover would be good to fixate free nitrogen from atmosphere but clover grows so slow
Hum... never thought of that but if you cut away a sq foot, it shouldn't be an issue. I think.
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Old 03-15-2018, 04:19 AM #6
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Is the idea that winter rye will help the plants blend in?

Also, if one plants clover at the beginning of the season, could winter rye essentially be planted on top of it in August? Could you maybe cut out a few chunks of clover and throw rye in it its place?
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Old 03-15-2018, 04:28 AM #7
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My thought was for blend in yes as the winter rye stays green like some native grasses. Problem is those native grasses are usually in areas to wet for canibis.

Yes you can definitely over seed your clover with rye. I do a few acres of this for wildlife on my land. Great place to find shed antlers in spring!
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Old 03-15-2018, 04:30 AM #8
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Rye is so easy to grow that I've had it grow a few inches tall in the box of my truck from a spilled bag
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Old 03-15-2018, 04:44 AM #9
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I planted the rye and clover to build up the soil. I'm not worried about how much nutrients are locked in the
plants while they are still alive. Eventually they will be returned to the soil. My regular plant fertilizers will help
me until then.

BTW: I applied an entire bag of lawn fertilizer on the area to help things along.

Once the snow melts, I'll be spreading dolomitic limestone to bring up the pH which is on the low side now.
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Old 03-15-2018, 05:10 AM #10
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If your returning the green manure into soil anyways should look into tillage turnips. They pull up nutrients from deep and hold it up close to surface for next crop.

Rocky fields some smart farmers now plant fall turnips rather than plow and have to pick stones.
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