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Old 06-25-2019, 04:32 PM #111
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I let pH drop before adding char.
There’s a point where it will “pickle” and that’s when I start adding it. Same idea as your eggshells.
I personally have some fear of the acidic conditions. Possible breeding ground for acid resistant bacteria. Not to throw in unneeded hysteria, but my knowledge drops off at that point.
Currently, I’m basically do the same thing with some yucca blossoms.
Good posts.
Appreciated.
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Old 06-25-2019, 05:33 PM #112
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Thanks for the explanation, definitely seems like we're on the same page! The biochar/ashes also has the advantage of adding a little K to the mix too.

As far as creating some sort of super baddie, I'm planning on turning this aerobic and possibly thermophillic at some point. So I think that should help clean things up again. When I was in school we visited a waste treatment facility. They operarated by switching between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Basically they would let it ferment, then bubble it, stop bubbling, and start bubbling.... each time different organisms would move in to take advantage of the available nutrients. The life/death, and pH swings would cause sediment that would be cleaned out in between each step. Eventually the water has low enough levels that it can be discharged.

@Teddybrae Yeah man it's a good time to get out doors, and I like to get dirty. Human activities generate an over abundance of wasted material, I find great pleasure in taking advantage of that. Every perceived "waste" is a potential future resource, you just have to figure out how to use it. Mother Nature has been doing it for like 4.1 billion years now, essentially she wrote the book.
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:08 PM #113
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Well run sewage remediation plants are a great place to learn about microorganisms! Dare I say, better than some courses being offered by 'experts' [at a tremendous cost].

Presently I'm running some 99% anaerobic fermentations in a lighted [for PNSB] homemade incubator. I regulate the temperature to fluctuate from 100 to 104F. I've got several long term batches going for ingestion and had some horticultural batches. It took the incubator about 24 hours to bring up a stable temperature. At a week the horticultural batches were around 3.8 pH, not satisfactory in my book so I put them back in and forgot about checking them until 20 days after start. They finished at 3.40 and 3.35. Perfect in my estimation.

I've never had an issue with acidy fermentations harming plants after diluting in water at around 1:250

Hookahead; You have mentioned culturing Trichoderma fungi and also mentioned previously that the fungi on used coffee grounds are Trichoderma species. How certain are you of this? and do you have a pointer to more information?

BTW, I wiped out one hatch of white flies with a watery extract (tea) of mint, garlic dry chunks and cayenne powder with a couple squirts of Dawn [to stick] Some plants did not like it but it sure worked on the white flies.
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Old 06-25-2019, 11:48 PM #114
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@Teddybrae Yeah man it's a good time to get out doors, and I like to get dirty. Human activities generate an over abundance of wasted material, I find great pleasure in taking advantage of that. Every perceived "waste" is a potential future resource, you just have to figure out how to use it. Mother Nature has been doing it for like 4.1 billion years now, essentially she wrote the book.

Yes! We have a small house and mostly live outdoors in a Eucalypt forest which white man has been burning annually for 200 years. no matter where one digs soil there is char in it. local graziers burn their grass annually and feeble grasses grow on the char as do weeds like Lantana.


So our soil situation is ironic. without savage burning it would not be so fertile. without savage burning there would be more Nature remaining unless you count woody weeds!


Ancient Aussie farewell to you, Sir ... Ooroo!
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:27 AM #115
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MM I'm sure you already know trichoderma is possibly the easiest thing to capture/cultivate from the wild. Very easy to get a culture going on a petri. It has dark green mass of spores in the center, and a leading edge of white. Anybody who has done any type of mycology work had learned to dread it. It will grow in the same water/molasses mixture as labs, but I sterilize it by boiling first. A small square from a petri has a shit ton of spores.

I have also seen it growing on damp coffee grounds many many times, both here in the tropics or back in the north. It's one of those things that when you see it you recognize it. I have had success growing lots of trichoderma by taking partially dried used coffee grounds, and sealing them up for a few weeks. However this method is certainly not full proof and could potentially grow some nasty stuff... so I can't recommend it.
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Old 06-26-2019, 03:49 AM #116
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The bottom two pictures are of the same thing... they are these "clumps" that are all over the surface of the ground. They are easy to pick up, and stick together fairly well. They feel like they are made from clay. I will powder them and use them sparingly as a mineral powder.
Where I live those clumps are always next to a hole in the ground. I always heard it was from a crawdad (or krayfish) digging a burrow.
Here's a video that looks similar.
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Old 06-26-2019, 04:04 AM #117
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We had crawfish where I grew up, we used to collect them from under rocks. They make great fishing bait for bass.

I noticed a few holes beside my "castings" but nothing as big as in the video. These holes are maybe a pencil in diameter, and not mounded up. I'm fairly convinced the they are deep dwelling Earth worm castings. I'll try to take a picture of them in my hand for size reference, I think they're much smaller than you're thinking... but still impressively large for worm dirt.

I wanted to add I've been messing around with different "traps" for starting LABs. My first few batches I used rice water rinse, but recently I've been playing with water from cooking potatos and pasta. I always salt my water "to taste like the ocean" as many chefs reccomend. So I imagine the higher salt content might make for a more selective environment. I do have access to a scope with a camera on it, along with gram stains. However, I'm not sure I could identify different species present. At best I think I could only quantify what's in there. This hasn't been too important for me, my other methods tell me that it's at least working haha.
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Old 06-26-2019, 04:53 AM #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hookahhead View Post
MM I'm sure you already know trichoderma is possibly the easiest thing to capture/cultivate from the wild. Very easy to get a culture going on a petri. It has dark green mass of spores in the center, and a leading edge of white. Anybody who has done any type of mycology work had learned to dread it. It will grow in the same water/molasses mixture as labs, but I sterilize it by boiling first. A small square from a petri has a shit ton of spores.

I have also seen it growing on damp coffee grounds many many times, both here in the tropics or back in the north. It's one of those things that when you see it you recognize it. I have had success growing lots of trichoderma by taking partially dried used coffee grounds, and sealing them up for a few weeks. However this method is certainly not full proof and could potentially grow some nasty stuff... so I can't recommend it.
I know that Trichoderma easily corrupts mycology endeavors but you can really only verify a true culture by very specific morphology via microscopy or by PCR. [or purchase certified spores] The last trichoderma culture I grew was red. I've grown yellow as well. There are many types.






photos from google
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:03 AM #119
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Just out of curiosity what do you mean by a true culture? I know that you can obtain specific species and cultivars via a lab. Do you know of look alike species?

Something like this is what I'm familiar with, not my picture.


Perhaps this species isn't even what I'm looking for?
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:36 PM #120
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By true culture, I just mean that I know for sure what it is. I grew harzianum and atroviride. I just bought the spores from Koppert and Jenifer McBeath respectively.

When I saw your mention of the coffee ground fungus, I thought maybe you were on to something. I really miss having the spores to activate for control of fungal pathogens. I recently found Koppert in Mexico so I'll try to get some.

Biobest, a predatory insect supplier has opened a location in Guadalajara but they will not sell to me without being a Mexican registered business. Highly stupid. It pisses me off since I had a lot to do with these companies getting a foothold in North America.
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