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Old 03-02-2019, 02:44 PM #911
jackspratt61
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There are your sources leading to salt build-up. I lowered my compost portion to approx. 20% by cutting the existing mix after I washed it to around .6-.8EC. Choices are many but you must lower the Na and increase aeration while maintaining an evenly moisture retaining mix. For my mix that ended up being 35-40% peat,20% aeration(perlite/lava),10% vermiculite,10% bark and 20-25% compost. Rinse your peat well...it too can have excess Na. Maybe take 5gals of existing mix and rinse well then cut it until you like the 'feel' of it. Send that for testing. Keep notes of what you do including how much water you used to rinse the medium and the starting and final EC of the runoff. Learn the math...raise Ca to 80%...balance the metals...
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Old 03-02-2019, 06:27 PM #912
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bc...did you use 940 for Na? I don't see my error.
Just remarking on the sodium- however you cut it it's a lot like you said. Gotta get that Ca up and Mg/Na down
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Old 03-07-2019, 05:23 AM #913
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So you think its from my compost I was just looking at the numbers on sodium it say .1 percent so 1000ppm That would make sense idk where else it would come from.

I flush the 30 gal container with 40 gal of water. Got it down to around 900ppm from 3500ppm
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Old 03-07-2019, 05:27 AM #914
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I forgot to post the compost lab report
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Old 03-07-2019, 09:34 AM #915
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Originally Posted by frankslan View Post
So you think its from my compost I was just looking at the numbers on sodium it say .1 percent so 1000ppm That would make sense idk where else it would come from.

I flush the 30 gal container with 40 gal of water. Got it down to around 900ppm from 3500ppm
The Na build-up can come from several places...kelp,crab meal,compost,worm castings,poor quality gypsum,water source,rock dusts...
Send another sample in and see how the bases have moved.
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Old 03-07-2019, 11:55 PM #916
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The Na build-up can come from several places...kelp,crab meal,compost,worm castings,poor quality gypsum,water source,rock dusts...
Send another sample in and see how the bases have moved.
Thanks the compost def seems like it has high salts so I think its from there. I use ro water other amendments are top quality, gypsum is down to earth brand. My rockdust is basalt so I think that's straight.


I hope this flushing helped Im going to send another sample in a few weeks and see if the Na left. Then at the end of the round Im going to cut this mix and send that in for a test. Thank you for the help.


I bought this seagreen product for the flush. I guess it was orginally called desalinator plus or something. I legit think these type of product are bullshit but a couple of my plants were pissed off about being transplant for a week now and they all perked up after watering with this seagreen a couple hour after even the plant I flushed looked happier than ever.

Im researching it and the created said this,

"I have no problem responding to your question. No-till farming was intended to be something that was done outside where there were seasonal rains that washed away excess ions, namely sodium. The problem I've noticed with some indoor, or container garden, no-till farmers is that there is no runoff ever, while organic matter top dresses are continually applied. Even though the inputs are organic, many are marine based such as seabird guano or fish meal, or kelp meal, all of which may have rather high amounts of naturally occurring sodium. If the container is never watered to excess the sodium will never leave the system and will build up. The excess sodium displaces other beneficial cations, and even may cause chlorosis or necrosis. Also bacteria themselves are creating acids which are bringing into solution the required plant nutrients, but after a certain amount of runs these acids build up and create acidic soil conditions unless regular liming occurs.

When we mentioned that it can alleviate some of the harmful conditions that may arise out of no-till farming we are referring specifically to excess sodium. Sea Green contains halotrophic and chemotrophic bacteria which will immobilize sodium ions and buffer them from the rhizosphere. It's not a permanent fix but it will work pretty well for a long while.

Of course both of these issues can be alleviated through periodic flushing as if it were a winter rain. Though most indoor or container no-till farmers I have encountered do not incorporate such a practice into their regimen.

I hope this sheds light on to why that statement was made. We are big fans of Masanobu Fukuoka and respect no till farming very much."
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Old 03-08-2019, 01:44 AM #917
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Originally Posted by frankslan View Post
Thanks the compost def seems like it has high salts so I think its from there. I use ro water other amendments are top quality, gypsum is down to earth brand. My rockdust is basalt so I think that's straight.


I hope this flushing helped Im going to send another sample in a few weeks and see if the Na left. Then at the end of the round Im going to cut this mix and send that in for a test. Thank you for the help.


I bought this seagreen product for the flush. I guess it was orginally called desalinator plus or something. I legit think these type of product are bullshit but a couple of my plants were pissed off about being transplant for a week now and they all perked up after watering with this seagreen a couple hour after even the plant I flushed looked happier than ever.

Im researching it and the created said this,

"I have no problem responding to your question. No-till farming was intended to be something that was done outside where there were seasonal rains that washed away excess ions, namely sodium. The problem I've noticed with some indoor, or container garden, no-till farmers is that there is no runoff ever, while organic matter top dresses are continually applied. Even though the inputs are organic, many are marine based such as seabird guano or fish meal, or kelp meal, all of which may have rather high amounts of naturally occurring sodium. If the container is never watered to excess the sodium will never leave the system and will build up. The excess sodium displaces other beneficial cations, and even may cause chlorosis or necrosis. Also bacteria themselves are creating acids which are bringing into solution the required plant nutrients, but after a certain amount of runs these acids build up and create acidic soil conditions unless regular liming occurs.

When we mentioned that it can alleviate some of the harmful conditions that may arise out of no-till farming we are referring specifically to excess sodium. Sea Green contains halotrophic and chemotrophic bacteria which will immobilize sodium ions and buffer them from the rhizosphere. It's not a permanent fix but it will work pretty well for a long while.

Of course both of these issues can be alleviated through periodic flushing as if it were a winter rain. Though most indoor or container no-till farmers I have encountered do not incorporate such a practice into their regimen.

I hope this sheds light on to why that statement was made. We are big fans of Masanobu Fukuoka and respect no till farming very much."

toss a bunch of good quality Gypsum at it via slurry your next couple waterings and it'll push it out and then you can stop wondering what, why, how, simply fix it, move on and then resume what you do..... Seagreen WooWoo.....- know thy inputs; sometime less is more

This is very good quality gypsum as an example and suspends in water near immediately with no fuss - I'd call it indoor Gypsum (slightly woo woo) vs outdoor Gypsum if you will

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 03-08-2019, 02:42 AM #918
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well I want to know why so I can prevent it in the future or if I decide to make a new soil.

I also topdress sulfur to push it out but I ordered some water soluble gypsum too. I already have a lot of calcium

Im going to keep flushing periodically now I never water to run off ever.
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Old 03-08-2019, 02:46 AM #919
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thanks for the advice though led05 I was told sulfur would be better for me but I know gypsum is a good cure too.
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:04 AM #920
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Gypsum has about 16-18% sulphur for what that is worth
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