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Old 10-31-2018, 09:26 PM #1
DTOM420
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Natural compost - living soil from nature?

I was doing some work at a local farm this morning and went exploring into the woods down in the flood plain of a creek. It’s FULL of oak trees and nobody goes in there except wild animals and an occasional cow. Well, the forest floor is covered with a layer of partially decomposed oak leaves and a smattering of weeds and local flora. I pushed the light layer of leaves back (thinking they’d be great for composting) and I uncovered the blackest most beautiful looking soil I’ve ever seen out in nature! It doesn’t seem to have the clay content that the local soil is known for and its black, not brown or red.

I’m thinking it’s just a natural compost pile. What do y’all think? I can gather as much of it as I want, any time I want. Do you think it’d make ideal organic soil to use in a water-only recipe? It’s just GOTTA be great for growing but I’m not sure whether to try it as compost, media or a mix that just needs amending. What would y’all organic gurus do, if you were me?

Here is a pic of one of the trees


Here’s the leaf littler on the ground


Here’s the top layer of leaves pushed aside


And here’s a picture of it in my hand. It smell like a little slice of heaven! Better than any soil I’ve ever mixed!


Seems like the very definition of “living soil.”
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:34 PM #2
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I would definitely use it. A soil test would be a good idea. Local ag office does it cheap for macros and a few micros.
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:39 PM #3
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I would definitely use it. A soil test would be a good idea. Local ag office does it cheap for macros and a few micros.
Yeah, I should have said that. Lol. Test would definitely be in order. Thanks for pointing that out.

I’m hoping el Jeffe, @Microbeman will see this and chime in! I’ll bet the microbial life is incredible in there. In fact, when I get started making IMO1 this spot was the first place I thought of to go and harvest microbes.

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Old 11-01-2018, 04:27 AM #4
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Well, I ended up collecting 110 gallons of it. There’s a little leaf litter mixed in but there was a pretty good amount of mycelium growing on it. When I would flip over certain spots, you could see some nice batches of it. It’s going to be good for something so I’m going to collect what I can since I have the opportunity. I’ll end up sending off a sample for some testing.
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Old 11-01-2018, 04:43 AM #5
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Mostly likely acidic due to the oak. Make a tea with that gold and check the ph
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Old 11-01-2018, 05:11 AM #6
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As a quality compost base im prepared to bet its the bomb. Leaf litter makes a damn fine compost with all the micronutrients you could hope for. For organic soil mediums as opposed to teas i never find PH such a huge issue as the humates have a natural buffering effect. Add a little lime and gypsum just in case and a bit of cow or chicken shit and away you go. Or better yet if there's a sunny patch just loosen up a few square yards amend and stand back.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:25 AM #7
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hehe, ever heard of rudolf steiner? He has said a lot about oak… They say the oak grow on Places With little lime.... And the mysteri is that the bark contents lots of lime... Ca...
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:40 AM #8
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That will work great as a base for something like Coot's mix, you will need to add compost and amendments if you want a water only mix.

I collect something similar from the woods and use it as my base for outdoors and in. I harvest from a variety of woods and tree types.

If you can source a local supply of animal waste and bedding to compost you will really be hooked up.

If you have access to a pond or lake go to the shore opposite the source of the water and collect mud from just under water at the edge, this is your free mineral source.
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Old 11-01-2018, 01:45 PM #9
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This has been discussed a bunch of times in the forum.

I do not encourage nor do this for 2 reasons. 1/ The fungal structure in soil is different for trees. 2/ The forest needs this stuff. What will we do if a bunch of pot growers go digging up forest soil/humus?

It is easy to do searches in the forum. Also on my page I recommend grassy areas are more applicable to cannabis and vegetables.

One horrible problem which exists in one farming community I lived in was pot growers dumping soil, causing changes in pathogen, worm and microbial populations.

Don't just get a couple of attaboys from forum members and pull the trigger on things that could have negative impact; not just locally but with other people who read this.

Sorry to be a downer but....research; research; research
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Old 11-01-2018, 02:36 PM #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTOM420 View Post
I was doing some work at a local farm this morning and went exploring into the woods down in the flood plain of a creek. It’s FULL of oak trees and nobody goes in there except wild animals and an occasional cow. Well, the forest floor is covered with a layer of partially decomposed oak leaves and a smattering of weeds and local flora. I pushed the light layer of leaves back (thinking they’d be great for composting) and I uncovered the blackest most beautiful looking soil I’ve ever seen out in nature! It doesn’t seem to have the clay content that the local soil is known for and its black, not brown or red.

I’m thinking it’s just a natural compost pile. What do y’all think? I can gather as much of it as I want, any time I want. Do you think it’d make ideal organic soil to use in a water-only recipe? It’s just GOTTA be great for growing but I’m not sure whether to try it as compost, media or a mix that just needs amending. What would y’all organic gurus do, if you were me?

Here is a pic of one of the trees
View Image

Here’s the leaf littler on the ground
View Image

Here’s the top layer of leaves pushed aside
View Image

And here’s a picture of it in my hand. It smell like a little slice of heaven! Better than any soil I’ve ever mixed!
View Image

Seems like the very definition of “living soil.”



This what you hold in your hand is called Chernozyom soil,black type of humus rich soil.. its a special goodies if mixed with ripe
cow shit,good agro lime and other quality mineral part for
creating a rich soil mix... i will never use any aerators with
those soil cause its pity to destroy this nice soft structure..


Best soil in mine country comes from area that haved huge oaks,
some of them 3 to 4 meters fat tree stalks and this was ancient
forest.. some of trees was have unbelivable proportions..

after they cutted forest then they used this soil to grow crops..

everything growed like a charm,that area was famous by agriculture and it still is..







You found a black gold bro..
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