Register ICMag Forum Menu Features Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
You are viewing our:
in:
Forums > Marijuana Growing > Growroom Designs & Equipment > Growroom Electricity and Wiring

Thread Title Search
Post Reply
Growroom Electricity and Wiring Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-10-2009, 03:17 PM #11
sparkjumper
Guest

Posts: n/a
Here's one everyone needs to know,stay the fuck away from GFCI breakers!!Unless you want to be resetting them several times a day.When I am forced to use a circuit protected by a GFCI breaker on the job,I cut the "squiggle" line right off.Fuck those pieces of shit.I'm not big on GFI receptacles either unless you're growing in a couple inches of water lol
Quote


0 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 05:27 PM #12
PharmaCan
Senior Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Planet Stupid
Posts: 1,612
PharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by knifehitz View Post
You can install a GFCI circuit breaker if you do not wish to use all GFCI outlets.
Just a little FYI here - A GFCI receptacle is a breaker, you only need to use one to protect any/all other receptacles that are connected to the "load" wires/side of the GFCI.

PC
PharmaCan is offline Quote


0 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 05:57 PM #13
stoney419
Member

stoney419's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 747
stoney419 has a spectacular aura aboutstoney419 has a spectacular aura aboutstoney419 has a spectacular aura aboutstoney419 has a spectacular aura aboutstoney419 has a spectacular aura about
What a great thread thank you phillrhy and thank you to every body for the great additions
__________________
BIG BIG SOG 16 600s
stoney419 is offline Quote


Old 04-10-2009, 07:06 PM #14
madpenguin
Member

madpenguin's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 752
madpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by PharmaCan View Post
Just a little FYI here - A GFCI receptacle is a breaker, you only need to use one to protect any/all other receptacles that are connected to the "load" wires/side of the GFCI.

PC
Eh.... Bad use of terminology. A GFCI receptacle is a receptacle, not a breaker. They provide 2 different functions. But yes, one GFCI can protect an entire run of receptacles. Incoming power to the "line" of the GFCI receptacle and outgoing/downstream power to other receptacles connected to the "load" side of the GFCI receptacle. Yes, the GFCI will say "line" and "load" on the back. The "load" terminals are usually covered up with a yellow sticker when you pull it out of the box.
madpenguin is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 08:04 PM #15
PharmaCan
Senior Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Planet Stupid
Posts: 1,612
PharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by madpenguin View Post
Eh.... Bad use of terminology. A GFCI receptacle is a receptacle, not a breaker. They provide 2 different functions. But yes, one GFCI can protect an entire run of receptacles. Incoming power to the "line" of the GFCI receptacle and outgoing/downstream power to other receptacles connected to the "load" side of the GFCI receptacle. Yes, the GFCI will say "line" and "load" on the back. The "load" terminals are usually covered up with a yellow sticker when you pull it out of the box.
First of all, I'm not an idiot and I know the difference between a receptacle and a breaker, having installed many thousands of both. The GFCI is/can be, for all intents and purposes, a receptacle/breaker, performing the functions of both. Let's try to keep this thread constructive and not start picking nits just to try to show who is smarter than whom.

PC
PharmaCan is offline Quote


2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 08:33 PM #16
madpenguin
Member

madpenguin's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 752
madpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by PharmaCan View Post
First of all, I'm not an idiot and I know the difference between a receptacle and a breaker, having installed many thousands of both.
I never said or even implied you were an idiot. As to the rest, see below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pharmacan
The GFCI is/can be, for all intents and purposes, a receptacle/breaker, performing the functions of both.
Wrong!!!!

A GFCI receptacle absolutely does not provide over current protection. It provides protection against ground faults for your personal safety.

A breaker provides over current protection and nothing more (to prevent fires), unless it happens to be a GFCI breaker, then it provides both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pharmacan
Let's try to keep this thread constructive and not start picking nits just to try to show who is smarter than whom.

PC
And there's your issue.

I'm not correcting your statement to be a dick, I'm correcting your statement because many people don't know thing one about electricity. I'm doing it for their benefit, not yours.

If you choose to believe that a GFCI receptacle is the same thing as a breaker, thereby completely bypassing a circuit breaker, that's your choice, however..... I have a serious problem with people spreading misinformation when it could cost them their life or their home.

Basically, your saying it's completely acceptable to have an unfused branch circuit and that's a guaranteed way to burn your house down.
madpenguin is offline Quote


8 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 09:28 PM #17
sparkjumper
Guest

Posts: n/a
Good job madpenguin like Ricky Rickardo would say "way to splain".A GFI receptacle is certainly not an overcurrent device.Don't be so touchy bro everyone sometimes doesnt splain things too good at times,I'll try to splain.Current travels from the hot to the neutral and is constant,a GFI receptacle senses even the smallest change in current between hot and neutral and trips accordingly.Another words if current starts going through you to ground,a smaller amount will be going through the neutral tripping the circuit.I cant see any reason for one in a grow room myself,except maybe for hydro
Quote


Old 04-10-2009, 10:32 PM #18
madpenguin
Member

madpenguin's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 752
madpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura aboutmadpenguin has a spectacular aura about
And since we are now on the subject, I might as well throw this out in the open before the thread progresses too much farther.

If anyone has any doubts as to how to wire something correctly, then just don't do it.

I have a real problem with some folks around here giving advice as to dismantling ballasts, transformers, variacs and the like. I don't mean to belittle anyone on this forum, but that is way beyond the ability of the average person. I realize a lot of you are technically inclined and can do such things but to give such advice and word it like it's no big deal is morally and ethically wrong. I will not be responsible for the death of any member here so I will never tell someone how to do such things. My answer will, and always will be, "return it". And on a much lesser note, you void your warranty when you do stuff like that. You paid good money for your equipment so just return the damn thing. You shouldn't be expected, as a consumer, to have to service your own electrical equipment.

In fact, I should probably quit posting electrical related topics all together. Electricity is nothing to take lightly. People under estimate residential voltage all the time. The current that a 60w light bulb draws will kill you in a heart beat. Period. If the path crosses your heart, kiss your ass goodbye. Even if it doesn't cross your heart, but you manage to get "hung up", kiss your ass goodbye.

Also, you guys should understand my frame of mind. Yes, I'm an electrician. I love my job. I don't do it for the money. I do it because I thoroughly enjoy working with electricity. I'm an anal son-of-a-bitch and I take longer to do something than your average electrical contractor. Why? Because I do things the right way, not the quick way. If your really good, you can balance both (which I have a hard time doing). Thus, I no longer sub anymore but just work for a company.

So, being the way that I am, The National Electrical Code is scripture to me. Every article in the NEC was put there because someone died. Back in the early 1900's it was a very thin book. Look at how big it is now. So, actually, me telling anyone "unqualified" (yes, it's defined in the NEC) to do work without a permit is morally and ethically wrong. The shit needs to be inspected. If you own your own home, many jurisdictions will allow the home owner to pull a permit. If you live in an apartment, you really should not be doing the work yourself. You make a mistake and you kill everyone in the building. Could you live with yourself if you made a mistake wiring your grow room and your next door neighbors 4 year old daughter burned alive in her bed? Not me.

Or get this.... Say member "kindbud69" received some advice here to swap out the capacitor on his 1000w ballast. "O.K... Sounds easy enough". So kindbud69 goes down in the basement to his grow room to get the ballast. Since he enjoys being in his grow room, he gets a chair and a collapsible TV dinner table and decides to do the work there. Chillin with the plants on a lazy Sunday afternoon, gonna fix my ballast, life is good. Set's the ballast on the table. Takes the housing off. Correctly identifies the capacitor and starts to remove it.

BAM

Kindbud69 is now laying on the floor in cardiac arrest. Too bad joeschmoe589 forgot to mention that the capacitor could very well be charged still. Even more of a shame that kindbud69 had a small hole in his left shoe sole. Worse yet, kindbud69 spilled some water when topping off his res an hour earlier and happened to have his left foot sitting on a wet and grounded surface (concrete floor).

Too bad joeschmoe589 will never know that he indirectly just killed someone. Look at the last line in my sig and ignore the smiley face. It's probably the best thing you can do if you have any hesitation as to how to do something.

Sorry for the book but I take it very seriously and you guys should to. Also, if it's not obvious yet, any and all advice that I give is based upon 120/240v 60hz American electrical systems. If you live in Europe or anywhere else (most of the world) that deals with different voltages or frequencies, then you probably shouldn't be listening to me.
madpenguin is offline Quote


10 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2009, 11:57 PM #19
sparkjumper
Guest

Posts: n/a
I got nailed on one job so bad it made me goofy fucking with the wiring of my brain.I'm not kidding I found myself putting on two pair of underwear,pouring two glasses of coffee.Locking myself out locking myself in getting lost on the way to the store.I can go on and on.I googled electrical shock psychological problems and there were my symptoms in black and white.I went to a doctor and zoloft saved the day.It was fuckin scary I'll never forget it in my life.And that was after working for 10 years as an electrician lol.It's crazy stuff them electrons
Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-11-2009, 02:12 AM #20
PharmaCan
Senior Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Planet Stupid
Posts: 1,612
PharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the roughPharmaCan is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by madpenguin View Post
I never said or even implied you were an idiot. As to the rest, see below.



Wrong!!!!

A GFCI receptacle absolutely does not provide over current protection. It provides protection against ground faults for your personal safety.

A breaker provides over current protection and nothing more (to prevent fires), unless it happens to be a GFCI breaker, then it provides both.



And there's your issue.

I'm not correcting your statement to be a dick, I'm correcting your statement because many people don't know thing one about electricity. I'm doing it for their benefit, not yours.

If you choose to believe that a GFCI receptacle is the same thing as a breaker, thereby completely bypassing a circuit breaker, that's your choice, however..... I have a serious problem with people spreading misinformation when it could cost them their life or their home.

Basically, your saying it's completely acceptable to have an unfused branch circuit and that's a guaranteed way to burn your house down.
I never said that a GFCI receptacle provides over-current protection. Obviously that task is performed by the breaker for the circuit.

When an imbalance is detected, the GFCI will break the circuit for any protected receptacles. That's the only point I was trying to make.

But if twisting my words makes you feel smart, go for it. I'll not belabor the point any further.

PC
PharmaCan is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.

Post Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:55 PM.




This site is for educational and entertainment purposes only.
You must be of legal age to view ICmag and participate here.
All postings are the responsibility of their authors.
Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.