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Old 04-08-2019, 08:34 PM #1
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Vape pen explodes, rips away chunk of man's face, breaks some teeth, lawsuit says

MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Twenty-five-year-old David Bishop of Cordova was at home one morning last year when he decided to use an e-cigarette before going to work. He placed the device to his lips and pressed a button to start vaping.
Suddenly, a lithium battery inside the device exploded, a lawsuit alleges. The blast blew pieces of the e-cigarette into the man's face, breaking several teeth.
And the blast ripped away a chunk of flesh, from his upper lip through his lower left cheek, the legal filing says.
The explosion also splashed Bishop with battery acid, causing chemical or heat burns to his left hand, face, mouth and tongue, the suit alleges.
E-cigarette death: Texas man dies after vape pen he was using exploded, medical examiner says
FDA: Dozens of seizures reported after vaping, mostly by young people
The explosion that morning on May 31 was so violent that one piece of the vaping device flew into the air and left burn marks on the ceiling and wall before the piece finally landed on top of a cabinet, the lawsuit says.
Bishop required 65 stitches in his face and missed weeks from his job as a warehouse maintenance worker, his legal team says.
Bishop has filed suit against three companies involved in selling the e-cigarette and the two lithium batteries that powered it. The suit was originally filed in state court in October and transferred to federal court in February.
Bought at a store on Germantown Parkway, lawsuit says

Companies involved in the case have denied wrongdoing. A jury trial could take place next year.
The situation illustrates the fire and explosion dangers that accompany the use of the increasingly popular e-cigarette devices.
An e-cigarette or vape pen is a device that uses a battery to heat up a liquid that contains nicotine. The heat creates an inhalable vapor, and the practice is also called vaping.
The devices were introduced to the U.S. market around 2007 and since 2014 have been the most popular tobacco product among U.S. youth
Teen vaping: FDA proposes e-cigarette sale restrictions to curb teen vaping
Unlike other devices that use potentially explosive lithium batteries, e-cigarettes are put in people's mouths and held close to their faces.
"It's the prevalence and the intimacy of these devices," said David Hill, a lawyer for the Cordova man. "And if they are going to be so intimately used, they should be safe."
He declined to make his client available for an interview or to release photos of the damage to the client's face and to the home, citing the ongoing litigation.
Hill is also representing a client named Corry Stampley in another exploding e-cigarette lawsuit filed this year in Crittenden County Circuit Court in Arkansas.
'Like a bullet or small rocket' when a battery fails
Lithium-ion batteries are used in a laptops, phones and a wide range of other devices and are relatively safe, Consumer Reports wrote in a 2016 article.
However, in rare cases the batteries experience a failure called "thermal runway" in which the battery can hit temperatures as high as 1000 degrees. That can cause an explosion.
The e-cigarette lawsuit quotes extensively from a 2017 report produced by the U.S. Fire Administration, part of the Federal Emergency Management agency.
The report notes the intimacy of the e-cigarette devices — they go in people's mouths — plus other differences that make battery explosions more dangerous than in other devices.
Vape pen explodes, rips away chunk of man's face, breaks some teeth, lawsuit says

Daniel Connolly,USA TODAY 21 hours ago


MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Twenty-five-year-old David Bishop of Cordova was at home one morning last year when he decided to use an e-cigarette before going to work. He placed the device to his lips and pressed a button to start vaping.
Suddenly, a lithium battery inside the device exploded, a lawsuit alleges. The blast blew pieces of the e-cigarette into the man's face, breaking several teeth.
And the blast ripped away a chunk of flesh, from his upper lip through his lower left cheek, the legal filing says.
The explosion also splashed Bishop with battery acid, causing chemical or heat burns to his left hand, face, mouth and tongue, the suit alleges.
E-cigarette death: Texas man dies after vape pen he was using exploded, medical examiner says
FDA: Dozens of seizures reported after vaping, mostly by young people
The explosion that morning on May 31 was so violent that one piece of the vaping device flew into the air and left burn marks on the ceiling and wall before the piece finally landed on top of a cabinet, the lawsuit says.
Bishop required 65 stitches in his face and missed weeks from his job as a warehouse maintenance worker, his legal team says.
Bishop has filed suit against three companies involved in selling the e-cigarette and the two lithium batteries that powered it. The suit was originally filed in state court in October and transferred to federal court in February.
Bought at a store on Germantown Parkway, lawsuit says

Companies involved in the case have denied wrongdoing. A jury trial could take place next year.
The situation illustrates the fire and explosion dangers that accompany the use of the increasingly popular e-cigarette devices.
An e-cigarette or vape pen is a device that uses a battery to heat up a liquid that contains nicotine. The heat creates an inhalable vapor, and the practice is also called vaping.
The devices were introduced to the U.S. market around 2007 and since 2014 have been the most popular tobacco product among U.S. youth, according to a surgeon general's report.
'Modern-day prohibition'?: San Francisco looks to ban e-cigarette sales until FDA review
Teen vaping: FDA proposes e-cigarette sale restrictions to curb teen vaping
Unlike other devices that use potentially explosive lithium batteries, e-cigarettes are put in people's mouths and held close to their faces.
"It's the prevalence and the intimacy of these devices," said David Hill, a lawyer for the Cordova man. "And if they are going to be so intimately used, they should be safe."
He declined to make his client available for an interview or to release photos of the damage to the client's face and to the home, citing the ongoing litigation.
Hill is also representing a client named Corry Stampley in another exploding e-cigarette lawsuit filed this year in Crittenden County Circuit Court in Arkansas.
'Like a bullet or small rocket' when a battery fails
Lithium-ion batteries are used in a laptops, phones and a wide range of other devices and are relatively safe, Consumer Reports wrote in a 2016 article.
However, in rare cases the batteries experience a failure called "thermal runway" in which the battery can hit temperatures as high as 1000 degrees. That can cause an explosion.
The e-cigarette lawsuit quotes extensively from a 2017 report produced by the U.S. Fire Administration, part of the Federal Emergency Management agency.
The report notes the intimacy of the e-cigarette devices — they go in people's mouths — plus other differences that make battery explosions more dangerous than in other devices.

A flat lithium battery in a device such as a cell phone case might catch fire, but is less likely to explode, the report says.
And the shape and construction of e-cigarettes — something like a pipe — can contribute to explosions. "When the battery seal (at the end of the battery) ruptures, the pressure within the e-cigarette cylinder builds quickly until it ruptures, usually at the end," the report says.
The report recommends against using lithium batteries in e-cigarettes.
E-cigarette explosions are rare, but potentially deadly — at least two people have been killed in the U.S.

The report notes that fires and explosions caused by batteries in electronic cigarettes are uncommon.
"However, the consequences can be devastating and life-altering for the victims," the fire administration report says. "It is likely that the number of incidents and injuries will continue to increase."
A total of 195 separate incidents of explosion and fire involving an electronic cigarette were reported in the media between January 2009 and December 2016, the report says. Those reported incidents resulted in 133 injuries, of which 38 were severe.
The report says many other small fires were likely not reported to any fire department.
E-cigarette death: Florida man killed by exploding e-cigarette, medical examiner's office says
Since the 2017 U.S. Fire Administration report was published, media accounts have identified at least two deaths associated with exploding vaping devices.
A 38-year-old man was killed in Florida in May 2018 when a vape pen blew two projectiles into his head and caused a fire that burned 80 percent of his body, the Tampa Bay Times reported.
And a 24-year-old man died two days after a vape pen explosion in the Fort Worth area severed the carotid artery in his neck, The Washington Post reported.
Companies say Bishop brought explosion on himself

The device that exploded in the Cordova man's face was a VGOD Pro Mech 2 vaping device that Bishop purchased at Create a Cig Cordova at 465 Germantown Parkway, the lawsuit says.
The lawsuit demands damages from three companies: Create a Cig, VGOD, a California-based seller of e-cigarettes, as well as a U.S. affiliate of LG, the South Korean company that made the batteries.
Darrell Suriff, CEO of the Create A Cig parent company in Austin, Texas, said he didn't have specific information about the case.
In a court filing, Create A Cig offered more than 30 legal defenses, including that the company didn't manufacture the e-cigarette or the battery, and that Bishop's claims are barred because he assumed the risk of using the device, and that the explosion is his own fault.
VGOD made similar legal defenses, arguing that it didn't manufacture the e-cigarette — it's not clear who they say made it — and that Bishop brought the explosion on himself. "Plaintiff so carelessly and negligently conducted himself that he, by his own negligence, contributed directly and proximately to his own injuries," the lawyers for VGOD wrote.
Neither Create A Cig nor VGOD cited any specific actions by Bishop that brought on the explosion.
Juul: E-cigarette company Juul boosts lobbying spending by 167 percent amid FDA scrutiny
Meanwhile, LG Electronics filed a legal motion asking the judge to dismiss the company from the lawsuit.
"I can tell you they are probably barking up the wrong tree because LG Electronics doesn't make any batteries," said John Taylor, a company spokesman.
He said a sister company, LG Chemical, may make batteries.
Hill, the plaintiff's lawyer, said the legal team is working to sort out remaining questions of what companies should be named in the lawsuit.
Careful use of chargers recommended — but risks go beyond explosions

Using the right e-cigarette charger can help prevent fires, the U.S. Fire Administration report says. "Always use the charging appliance that comes with the unit, and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Plugging an e-cigarette into a 'standard' USB port to recharge may result in an explosion and/or fire."
Separately, the U.S. surgeon general's office has launched a campaign urging young people not to use e-cigarettes, citing factors including a high risk of nicotine addiction, potential nicotine damage to developing brains, plus exposure to other potentially harmful chemicals in vapor.
The federal Food and Drug Administration is also investigating whether use of e-cigarettes can cause seizures.
Jury trial and mediation set

A federal jury trial in the David Bishop case is set for June 15, 2020 before U.S. District Judge Sheryl H. Lipman.
The parties have also agreed to mediation later this year, a settlement negotiation process that could make the trial unnecessary.
https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/v...195636638.html
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:43 PM #2
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Somebody chime in here about how vaping is safer than smoking, LOL. Anybody ever have a joint or a bowl blow off part of their face?
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:44 PM #3
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last one i read few months back it exploded sending projectile up nose into brain. crazy shit man. i aint going out like that .stick to joints
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:44 PM #4
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The places that sell the batteries have huge warnings on them not to use them in vape devices. Which is weird because they are selling them to be used in vaping devices. But then they warn you to never use them that way. Whole situation seems fucky.
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:45 PM #5
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That's like the warning on Q-Tips to never put one in your ear- WTF?
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:57 PM #6
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Exploding vape pen caused Florida man’s death, autopsy says
In what is believed to be one of the first deaths from an e-cigarette malfunction, a 38-year-old man in Florida was killed when his vape pen exploded, sending projectiles into his head and causing a small fire in his house.
Tallmadge D’Elia was found May 5 in the burning bedroom of his family’s home in St. Petersburg, according to the Tampa Bay Times. An autopsy report released his week blamed a vape pen explosion for his death, local news outlets reported.
The cause of death was listed as “projectile wound of head” — the pen exploded into pieces, at least two of which were sent into his head, the Pinellas-Pasco Medical Examiner said — and he suffered burns on about 80 percent of his body.
The “mod”-type pen is manufactured in the Philippines and distributed by Smok-E Mountain.
A representative from Smok-E Mountain tells us their devices do not explode, instead telling us it is likely an atomizer (the part a person inserts into their mouth) or a battery issue. The company says they've had problems with other companies cloning their batteries, which makes them less safe. The company is hoping to see photos of the device that was used by D'Elia.
According to a report from the U.S. Fire Administration, which is part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, there were at least 195 incidents in which an electronic cigarette exploded or caught fire from 2009 through 2016, resulting in 133 injuries, 38 of which were severe.
But there were no recorded deaths in the study's period.
The explosions usually occur suddenly, the report found, “and are accompanied by loud noise, a flash of light, smoke, flames, and often vigorous ejection of the battery and other parts.”
More than half of the total incidents, 128, included fires started on nearby objects.
[The great mystery of e-cigarettes]
The report blamed the incidents on the prevalence of lithium-ion batteries in the products. “No other consumer product places a battery with a known explosion hazard such as this in such close proximity to the human body,” it said. “It is this intimate contact between the body and the battery that is most responsible for the severity of the injuries that have been seen. While the failure rate of the lithium-ion batteries is very small, the consequences of a failure, as we have seen, can be severe and life-altering for the consumer.”
The health effects related to the ingestion of e-cigarette vapor are still being studied by government agencies.
There are no regulations that apply to the safety of the electronic mechanics or batteries of e-cigarettes, the U.S. Fire Administration report noted, though they are being considered by the Food and Drug Administration.
The Food and Drug Administration's recommendations for e-cigarette use include: not letting loose e-cig batteries come into contact with coins, keys, or other metal objects; not charging with a phone charger; not charging while unattended; and not mixing and matching different brands or old and new batteries
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.739a025d73e2
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:58 PM #7
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The 18650 batteries and likes can be very dangerous. Many accidents with serious injuries and even deaths in some cases have happened.

Watch out with cheap chinese made li-ions!

Here is a video of a guy who pierces a 18650 from a vape with just a nail.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=136s&v=WnZuMfq6kec
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Old 04-08-2019, 09:05 PM #8
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Don't ever let oxygen into a lithium ion battery! That's how you let the magic smoke out! In all seriousness, I just bought 2 of the 18650 for arduino projects and they came with a laundry list of warnings.
USAGE OF THIS BATTERY IS AT YOUR OWN RISK!
DO NOT USE WITH E-CIGARETTE, VAPORIZER, OR SIMILAR DEVICE
DO NOT STORE LOOSE OR IN A POCKET, PURSE, ETC. ALWAYS USE A PROTECTIVE CASE OR BOX FOR STORAGE AND TRANSPORT
WHEN NOT IN USE, ALWAYS STORE LITHIUM ION BATTERIES IN THE PROTECTIVE CASE/BOX IN WHICH BATTERIES WERE DELIVERED
Misusing or mishandling lithium ion batteries can pose a SERIOUS RISK of personal injury or property damage
BATTERIES MAY EXPLODE, BURN, OR CAUSE A FIRE IF MISUSED OR MISHANDLED
Usage of batteries is AT YOUR OWN RISK!
ONLY use with proper protection circuitry
DO NOT short circuit intentionally or unintentionally
KEEP AWAY from metal/conductive objects to prevent short circuiting
DO NOT use if PVC wrapper or terminal insulator is damaged or torn
DO NOT use if battery is damaged in any way
DO NOT over-charge or charge above the maximum voltage rating
DO NOT over-discharge or exceed the continuous discharge rating
DO NOT modify, disassemble, puncture, cut, crush, or incinerate
DO NOT expose to liquids or high temperatures
DO NOT solder onto battery, spot weld only
DO NOT use force to install or install in reverse/backwards
ONLY use within manufacturer’s specification
KEEP AWAY from pets and children
DO NOT TAUNT HAPPY FUN BALL
ALWAYS charge in or on a fire-proof surface and never leave batteries charging unattended
ONLY use a smart charger designed for this specific type of battery
DO NOT mix and match brands and models, old and new, used and unused batteries
STOP immediately if while charging/storing/using the battery it emits an unusual smell, feels hot, changes color or shape, or appears abnormal in any way
It is your responsibility to determine that your charger or device is functioning properly
If exposed to battery electrolyte, flush with water immediately and/or immediately contact a physician or emergency services
DO NOT throw away in trash; contact your local jurisdiction for proper recycling or disposal
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Old 04-08-2019, 09:07 PM #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tudo View Post
Exploding vape pen caused Florida man’s death, autopsy says
In what is believed to be one of the first deaths from an e-cigarette malfunction, a 38-year-old man in Florida was killed when his vape pen exploded, sending projectiles into his head and causing a small fire in his house.
Tallmadge D’Elia was found May 5 in the burning bedroom of his family’s home in St. Petersburg, according to the Tampa Bay Times. An autopsy report released his week blamed a vape pen explosion for his death, local news outlets reported.
The cause of death was listed as “projectile wound of head” — the pen exploded into pieces, at least two of which were sent into his head, the Pinellas-Pasco Medical Examiner said — and he suffered burns on about 80 percent of his body.
The “mod”-type pen is manufactured in the Philippines and distributed by Smok-E Mountain.
A representative from Smok-E Mountain tells us their devices do not explode, instead telling us it is likely an atomizer (the part a person inserts into their mouth) or a battery issue. The company says they've had problems with other companies cloning their batteries, which makes them less safe. The company is hoping to see photos of the device that was used by D'Elia.
According to a report from the U.S. Fire Administration, which is part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, there were at least 195 incidents in which an electronic cigarette exploded or caught fire from 2009 through 2016, resulting in 133 injuries, 38 of which were severe.
But there were no recorded deaths in the study's period.
The explosions usually occur suddenly, the report found, “and are accompanied by loud noise, a flash of light, smoke, flames, and often vigorous ejection of the battery and other parts.”
More than half of the total incidents, 128, included fires started on nearby objects.
[The great mystery of e-cigarettes]
The report blamed the incidents on the prevalence of lithium-ion batteries in the products. “No other consumer product places a battery with a known explosion hazard such as this in such close proximity to the human body,” it said. “It is this intimate contact between the body and the battery that is most responsible for the severity of the injuries that have been seen. While the failure rate of the lithium-ion batteries is very small, the consequences of a failure, as we have seen, can be severe and life-altering for the consumer.”
The health effects related to the ingestion of e-cigarette vapor are still being studied by government agencies.
There are no regulations that apply to the safety of the electronic mechanics or batteries of e-cigarettes, the U.S. Fire Administration report noted, though they are being considered by the Food and Drug Administration.
The Food and Drug Administration's recommendations for e-cigarette use include: not letting loose e-cig batteries come into contact with coins, keys, or other metal objects; not charging with a phone charger; not charging while unattended; and not mixing and matching different brands or old and new batteries
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.739a025d73e2
thats the one
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Old 04-08-2019, 09:13 PM #10
Cvh
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Here is another video about how 18650 explosions look like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUgbmCSmSNY
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