Register ICMag Forum Menu Features Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
You are viewing our:
in:
Forums > IC Magazine > USA Cannabis Scene: State By State > New York > Cuomo announces for legal recreational

Thread Title Search
Post Reply
Cuomo announces for legal recreational Thread Tools
Old 06-20-2019, 11:00 PM #111
igrowone
Senior Member

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 5,147
igrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond reputeigrowone has a reputation beyond repute
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunkypigs View Post
Didn't see this when it dropped in May.... funny how she knew seven weeks ago that this was dead but meanwhile the media kept pumping it up n the news nonstop.

Legalization Soon in New York? “No Shot”

Senator Diane Savino, an influential voice in the cannabis debate, explains how adult use lost steam, why home grow is unlikely, and for which far-ranging medical reforms she’ll push.

PUBLISHED ON MAY 2, 2019 6:55AM EDT
NEW YORK

Alyson Martin
@alysonrmartin
Co-founder of Cannabis Wire.

This month could be a tipping point for cannabis legalization in New York. After lawmakers failed to reach an agreement on adult use in time for it to be included in the state budget, April 1, a spokesperson for Governor Andrew Cuomo told Cannabis Wire to “expect conversations will pick up in earnest” in May. Well, it’s May, and so far conversations don’t seem to have coalesced any more than the last time we checked in.

Cannabis Wire co-founder Alyson Martin joined Senator Diane Savino on the FAQ podcast yesterday to ask about where legalization conversations went wrong, and what to expect from the efforts to expand the state’s medical cannabis program.

According to Senator Savino, the April 1 deadline simply didn’t provide enough time. Lawmakers needed to try to convince officials from areas like Long Island that had come out strong against legal sales, and they needed more time to come together over exactly how equity provisions should unfold. “One after the other, you had local governments saying, ‘We don’t want it in our backyard,’” Savino said. “And that just created more anxiety from members who were teetering on the fence.”

One overall question for Savino was: Did Cuomo put his political capital behind legalization in the budget negotiation process?

“I’ve worked with this man a long time now, so I know when he really wants to do something, he knows how to get down in the trenches and negotiate to a final solution. So, I didn’t see that happening here, and I’m not sure why,” Savino told me and FAQ co-hosts Harry Siegel and Fordham professor Christina Greer during an interview for the podcast (you can listen to it in full later today by going to FAQ.NYC).

“I would suggest it’s possible he knew this wasn’t going to happen, because of all the opposition that was coming from different points of view,” Savino said. “He was going to take it on the chin if it didn’t happen. And so, let the legislature take the blame. And that’s kind of the way it shook out. So, will he take another stab at it? I don’t know. Yeah, I think it’s too soon to tell.”

Where does that leave the legalization negotiation? What’s the timeline?

Legalization, as a standalone bill, Savino said—“It really has no shot. And that’s where we find ourselves now.”

She pointed out that “If those same legislators wouldn’t vote for it today as a standalone bill, the likelihood that they’d vote for it in an election year becomes even slimmer. So, I think that the long term prospects are: You’re looking at two or three years before we get to a legal adult use market, unless something changes that I can’t see.”


That doesn’t necessarily mean that Savino and her colleagues are giving up on legalization, however, even if it stalls over the next year or two:

“The truth is, there’s an awful lot of opposition to it, from a whole bunch of different perspectives, that it was simple enough to just let it go. And not fight the fight. But I think it’s a fight that needs to be had, and we’re going to continue working on it.”

Savino previously told Cannabis Wire that she was going to be working on the expansion of the medical cannabis program. Yesterday, Savino doubled down on that goal.

When medical cannabis was passed in 2014, Cuomo “was not really a big supporter,” Savino said. “He fought me every step of the way. And as a condition of signing of the bill once he realized that I had the votes, and I was going to bring it to the Senate floor, he forced in some compromise on it,” Savino told me and FAQ. This narrowed the program’s number of license holders at first to just five, each able to open four storefronts. “In a state with 19 million people, it was just so ridiculous. But you know sometimes you have to compromise to get the legislation done,” Savino said.

So among the many changes that Savino is eyeing for the medical cannabis program is increasing the number of dispensaries: The state, she noted, has just under 100,000 patients.

“So we need to double the number of dispensaries minimally. We need to add more registered organizations. We need to eliminate conditions as a requirement and leave that up to doctors and patients. We need to lift the restriction on smoking,” she said, referring to the ban on smokable medical cannabis products in the state.

When asked if patients can soon expect to be able to grow their own medical cannabis, Savino said “I doubt that.” And while there was “almost a possibility” for patients to do so in Cuomo’s legalization plan, Savino said she’s “not sure that will survive the expanded bill.”

“The truth is, if you’re going to have a legal, regulated market, it’s hard to manage home grow. I don’t know how you really do that,” Savino said. “And every state that has it, has said to us, ‘Don’t do it.’”
this corporate c**t finished up with how home growing is an unsolvable problem
but in the same 'speech' states that it was public sales that actually killed it
the average voter has no problem with people growing on a small scale in their home
just no smell, no tell, and no sell - our own slogan
corporate blood suckers of course have a great deal of problem with home growing
it's the nature of being a blood sucker
__________________
current grow: www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?p=7872194
igrowone is online now Quote
Old 06-21-2019, 12:57 PM #112
zachrockbadenof
Senior Member

Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,017
zachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to allzachrockbadenof is a name known to all
so the dickheads pass some type of de-crim law... no rec/home growing... nothing... they suck
zachrockbadenof is offline Quote
Old 06-23-2019, 04:40 PM #113
shaggyballs
Senior Member

shaggyballs's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hold your hand up...right about there!
Posts: 2,529
shaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant futureshaggyballs has a brilliant future
Rev. Al Sharpton
Marijuana legalization in New York can't just be about making money.
It should be about making amends.
The wounds from the war on drugs run deep in communities of color.
We must reject legislation without reconciliation.
__________________
Vote no to legalize cannabis or else!
HydroBuddy
Nute calculator
Ins and outs of Pythium
OVERGROW FAQ

I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
shaggyballs is online now Quote

Post Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:35 AM.




This site is for educational and entertainment purposes only.
You must be of legal age to view ICmag and participate here.
All postings are the responsibility of their authors.
Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.