Register ICMag Forum Menu Features Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
You are viewing our:
in:
Forums > Marijuana Growing > Growing in Coco Coir > Best product for russet/broad mites

Thread Title Search
Post Reply
Best product for russet/broad mites Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-14-2019, 08:04 PM #1
IngFarmer
Member

Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 176
IngFarmer will become famous soon enoughIngFarmer will become famous soon enough
Best product for russet/broad mites

Can you guys advice me on the best product for russet/broad mites? What do you guys think about the product smc? https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Nu...1&keywords=smc
I already ordered this product and neem oil...but does anyone knows of something which the mites cannot get used to? something which the mites cannod develop resistant to? I've been using alcohol and water but I see no difference...
I used to have spider mites, but washing the plants every 4 days dealt with them, but now I have the russets...these guys are the definition of the devil...
IngFarmer is offline Quote


Old 03-14-2019, 08:12 PM #2
big315smooth
Member

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: ADK
Posts: 302
big315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nicebig315smooth is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by IngFarmer View Post
Can you guys advice me on the best product for russet/broad mites? What do you guys think about the product smc? https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Nu...1&keywords=smc
I already ordered this product and neem oil...but does anyone knows of something which the mites cannot get used to? something which the mites cannod develop resistant to? I've been using alcohol and water but I see no difference...
I used to have spider mites, but washing the plants every 4 days dealt with them, but now I have the russets...these guys are the definition of the devil...
watch a few videos of guy had bad russet problem he used predator mites.i did alittle reasearch on them seem to work. safer than pesticide
big315smooth is online now Quote


Old 03-14-2019, 10:25 PM #3
Ibechillin
Member

Ibechillin's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Tacoma, Washington 47n
Posts: 975
Ibechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud of
Spraying sulfur is supposed to work well to kill russet mites and is considered organic, mostly recommended to use in veg. Be careful not to spray oils (neem/horticulural) and sulfur in close time frames of eachother as together they are phytotoxic.
__________________
From out the woodwork.

Light Science Information (Sticky Thread):

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=358147

Drying and Cure Process Explained In Depth (Sticky Thread):

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=358186

Silicon, The Misunderstood Element:

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=352413

Humic and Fulvic acid information:

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=352265

Last edited by Ibechillin; 03-15-2019 at 07:15 PM..
Ibechillin is offline Quote


5 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-15-2019, 08:16 AM #4
IngFarmer
Member

Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 176
IngFarmer will become famous soon enoughIngFarmer will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibechillin View Post
Spraying sulfur is supposed to work well to kill russet mites and is considered organic, mostly recommended to use in veg. Be careful not to spray oils and sulfur in close time frames of eachother as together they are phytotoxic.
sulfur eh, where to get it? what is the product name?
IngFarmer is offline Quote


Old 03-15-2019, 08:32 AM #5
indabonga
Cannabis Guru

indabonga's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,292
indabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant futureindabonga has a brilliant future
Abamectina
__________________
Intrallazzi in da mix
indabonga is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-15-2019, 08:43 AM #6
Wendull C.
Senior Member

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Where the peaks meet the sky
Posts: 1,717
Wendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant future
Avid, forbid 4f, neem as an ovacide, avid again and forbid for good measure. Of course in flower predators are your only option. Check out Kevin jodreys YouTube vids on russets.
Wendull C. is offline Quote


3 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-15-2019, 06:43 PM #7
MJPassion
Observer

MJPassion's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: uni-verse
Posts: 6,944
MJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivorMJPassion is a survivor
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendull C. View Post
Avid, forbid 4f, neem as an ovacide, avid again and forbid for good measure. Of course in flower predators are your only option. Check out Kevin jodreys YouTube vids on russets.

Then a couple gens minimum of clones, after eradication, to ensure you're not ingesting the residuals of those narsty narsty chemicals (Forbid & Avid).
MJPassion is offline Quote


2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-15-2019, 06:54 PM #8
Wendull C.
Senior Member

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Where the peaks meet the sky
Posts: 1,717
Wendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant futureWendull C. has a brilliant future
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJPassion View Post
Then a couple gens minimum of clones, after eradication, to ensure you're not ingesting the residuals of those narsty narsty chemicals (Forbid & Avid).
That is just to save prized mothers I refused to lose. Then clone, grow out, clone again before being able to flower any cuts. Getting clean cuts from generous brothers in the mean time.
Wendull C. is offline Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-15-2019, 07:03 PM #9
Ibechillin
Member

Ibechillin's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Tacoma, Washington 47n
Posts: 975
Ibechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud ofIbechillin has much to be proud of
Most hardware and garden/feed stores should have wettable sulfur powder/fungicide sprays, order online if cant find locally.

Hemp Russet Information From Certified Kind (Wa states 3rd party Organic certification program):

Hemp Russet Mite (Aculops cannabicola) is a type of microscopic arthropod that feeds on leaves, new growth, flower buds, and on glandular trichomes of cannabis (Petanovic, 2007). Hemp Russet Mite belongs to the Eriophyidae family of mites which are economically significant crop pests in citrus, apples, grapes, hazelnuts, coconuts, and tomatoes. Symptoms of Hemp Russet Mite damage can be confused with nutrient deficiencies, viruses, and physiological disorders (Van Leeuen, 2010). Hemp Russet Mite has the potential to be a major pest issue for medical and adult-use cannabis production. Hemp Russet Mite infestations have been reported in both indoor and outdoor legalized cannabis production in California, Oregon, Colorado, and Washington. Hemp Russet Mites are closely related and belong to the same genus as the Tomato Russet Mite. Studies of the Tomato Russet Mite show that russet mite populations are suppressed under very cold temperatures or under high temperatures above 86 degrees F (Gerson, 2012). In areas with very cold winters, pest populations decline dramatically. However, most cannabis growers clone plants from mother plants that are held indoors or in greenhouses where temperatures rarely drop below freezing.

Russet mites on mother plants can be passed along to clones. As legalized cannabis production expands, many cannabis producers are acquiring cloned plants from other farms or nurseries and may be inadvertently introducing hemp russet mite onto their farms. If growers don’t understand how to spot Hemp Russet Mite damage and deal with it using natural and organic approved control strategies, they risk severe reduction in crop yield and quality. This article will explain how to recognize the symptoms of Hemp Russet Mite damage and will discuss several options for controlling the Hemp Russet Mite using practices and pest control materials that are approved in organic farming systems.

How to Spot Leaf Damage Caused by Hemp Russet Mite:

Hemp Russet Mite is a manageable pest if outward signs and symptoms of an infestation are recognized early. The mite is difficult to observe, even with a hand lens. You really need a microscope to see this pest. But growers can teach themselves to recognize characteristic leaf damage and flower damage, and respond with appropriate organic pest control strategies. Good farmers can detect subtle changes in plants because they understand the life cycle of the crop and its pests. They know what normal plant growth looks like and can spot abnormalities quickly. The key to successful pest control is frequent scouting and recognizing pest damage.





Controlling Hemp Russet Mites:

A non-toxic approach to dealing with many mite and insect pests is to introduce their predators into areas with known infestations. Commercially available beneficial predatory mites that have been shown to prey on Russet Mite include Neoseiulus californicus, Ambylseius andersoni, and Amblyseius swirskii. The soil dwelling generalist mite, Stratiolaelaps scimitus feeds on fungus gnat larvae, pupating thrip, pathogenic nematodes, and larval stages of root aphid. This predator mite may help to create a barrier at the soil surface and prevent hemp russet mite and broad mite from crawling up plant stalks to the leaves. Fighting pest mites with predator mites can be especially effective in indoor settings where temperature and humidity can be manipulated to help the released predator mite survive. For example, the beneficial predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii has been shown to be effective against white flies, spider mites, thrips, broad mites and the Tomato Russet Mite, and works best at temperatures between 72-84 degrees F and 70% humidity. Amblyseius andersoni is active and effective at low humidity and high temperatures and is known to feed on Hemp Russet Mite. Both indoor and greenhouse cannabis growers can re-use their soils, and mulch with straw to provide habitat for predator mites. One of the fundamental activities of any organic farmer is to work with natural cycles to build soil. By enhancing habitat for a diverse array of soil organisms, including predatory mites, cannabis growers can grow vigorous, pest free plants. Outdoor farmers can help establish populations of beneficial insects and arthropods by mulching and planting cover crops and insectary crops.

Certified Kind Approved Organic Pesticides:

Biopesticides include pest control materials that are derived from natural ingredients and include plant derived pest products like neem oil and garlic oil as well as pest control materials derived from
bacteria or fungus like Bacillus thuringiensis or Isaria fumosorosea, respectively. Cannabis farmers have had success combating Hemp Russet Mite using a combination of biopesticides including products that have active ingredients of Chromobacterium subtsugae, neem seed oil, Isaria fumosorosea, and citric acid. Growers have also reported success using plant oils and horticultural oils that work by smothering the mite. Mites in the Eriophyidae family are also known to be sensitive to sulfur. Elemental sulfur sprays have been used to control the Eriophyid mites in citrus groves in Florida since at least the 1930’s (Yothers, 1930). Elemental sulfur is an allowed pesticide in organic farming and is used extensively in modern day organic grape and tomato production to control mites and fungal pathogens. Sulfur is effective against Hemp Russet Mite infestations in cannabis. As with any pesticide, sulfur should be used with care, and applications should follow label instructions including the use of personal protective equipment and re-entry intervals. Although the EPA has established that sulfur pesticides are exempt from the establishment of a residue tolerance on food crops, no research has been conducted about sulfur pesticides used on cannabis intended be smoked or concentrated into an extract. Common sense suggests that farmers should avoid applying sulfur to cannabis during the flower stage. Growers should also not use horticultural oil and sulfur together since that combination will damage plant leaves.
Ideally, cannabis farmers will detect Hemp Russet Mite early and choose natural methods for control. Growers must develop robust, overlapping strategies for prevention of pests like Hemp Russet Mite. Building confidence in dealing with difficult pests like Hemp Russet Mite using natural and organic methods takes dedication, time, and practice yet is an essential and extremely valuable part of organic cannabis farming.
__________________
From out the woodwork.

Light Science Information (Sticky Thread):

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=358147

Drying and Cure Process Explained In Depth (Sticky Thread):

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=358186

Silicon, The Misunderstood Element:

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=352413

Humic and Fulvic acid information:

https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=352265
Ibechillin is offline Quote


2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-16-2019, 03:49 PM #10
jonesb
Member

Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 75
jonesb has a spectacular aura aboutjonesb has a spectacular aura aboutjonesb has a spectacular aura about
for veg a sulfer burn is the best and cheapest way to go

in flower Regalia, Grandevo, and Venerate IPM is a good way to go now that they are available in quarts.
jonesb is offline Quote


Post Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:19 AM.




This site is for educational and entertainment purposes only.
You must be of legal age to view ICmag and participate here.
All postings are the responsibility of their authors.
Powered by: vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.