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Women Are the Most Important Political Force in America

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    #16
    What has bloody ginas got to do with women being politically interested or powerful?

    Men (usually) have junk dangling between their legs, occasionally have brown streaked undies, and they manage to be interested in politics.

    That said, we'd probably make a weapon that would have you guys spit a ten pound bowling ball out your butt and then bleed for a few weeks afterward, too. Then tell you that you should spit out that bowling ball maybe once a year, and create laws that keep you from preventing those bowling balls from forming. We could call it God's will, cuz She gave women the power to do so.

    This is fun.

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      #17
      Say it with me now... prolapse.
      current catch all grow thread

      SSSDH x GROM/Digiberry from Stank Bros.

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        #18
        Naw, the doctors will give you a little slice to help the bowling ball get out. However, you will need to try to push that bowling ball out while the doc has you positioned upside down.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Nannymouse View Post
          Naw, the doctors will give you a little slice to help the bowling ball get out. However, you will need to try to push that bowling ball out while the doc has you positioned upside down.
          i noticed that watching my two being born. looked counter-productive as hell to me, fighting gravity like that.
          smoking more pot is NOT the answer to my problems. my problem is that i need more problems that smoking more pot IS the answer to...

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            #20
            Holy fucking shit. I NEVER thought the ignorant posts from Trump humpers on Trump humping threads could be topped!
            But half of these posts so far are so fukn ignorant it's, I'd say laughable, but it's not anymore. You ass backwards incel jail punks are so fukn stupid that it can't even be blamed on you. It is your parents' fault! Your parents set you up to be the failures that you undoubtedly are today. Go fuck your ignorant selves.

            And @amanda...I'm sure you were prepared for these retarded ass punks to spew their patently ignorant shit outta their word holes, but understand, there are plenty of intelligent people here too. But we are getting sooooo tired of debunking the conservative horse shit that dribbles out of cuck mouths here. Please don't take offense if the majority of the community doesn't decide to engage in ANOTHER round of proving pot growers aren't ignorant republican slugs.

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              #21
              Oh gosh, look what i've caused. Hope you feel better subrob, let that shit OUT!!!! Okay, i really don't approve of name-calling, usually...however, i was raised by an ex sailor dad and me mum was a farmer's daughter, and am/was blonde, did some bartending, so have probably heard it all or been the brunt of it all, ...and that was definitely an A to A plus job.

              armed, yah, i kept wanting to sit up, the doc asked the nurses to 'hold my hand' which was basically code, i think, for...she's gonna bolt! I never did ask, but i bet he was republican, harrrrrr. All that a woman in the birthing process goes through, and the 'position' is basically for the ease of the doctor,it seems.

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                #22
                Originally posted by Nannymouse View Post
                Deserving. If your actions or inactions caused tens of thousands of deaths, would you be 'deserving'? The word is reflective of a subjective stance. Laws vary from state to state. Is a person in one state more deserving than a person of another state, that commits the same crime? Yay, ethics class, it shook many of my 'rock solid' stances. Just because a state allows or encourages killing someone for a crime, does not necessarily make it RIGHT, or some states are right and some are wrong. Why would the Compton shooter be more deserving than a willingly negligent mass murderer?

                I'm not being snarky, just trying to understand the lines that you draw for yourself, on who is deserving.

                As far as more women being the cause of fewer state sanctioned deaths, could it be that they take the ten commandments a bit more to heart? Is it because they know what it takes to create a life and nurture that life? Is it because they think that the 'oops we made a mistake' instances are too many? Is it an overload of compassion? Or is the question really why do more men go for the killum idea? I dunno.

                Freedom...it's important to people, but when that freedom causes sicknesses and death to others, is that worth it? A gal actually intentionally coughed in a friend's face when he politely asked for her to give him more space in a grocery store. Who deserves that sort of freedom? Yes, go out in the wilderness and blow that covid at the trees, go for it. Otherwise, it's like the 'freedom' to drive a vehicle into a crowd.

                I once read that the word 'should' should be banned, and replaced with the word 'could'.

                I have little hope for humanity.
                The ten commandments are in line with killing murderers. It says thou shall not murder not though shall not kill, original Hebrew. Old testament they did it all the time. I am not a Christian but that is the law of the bible period. I am not a fan of killing adulterers or homosexuals like it says in there, by the way.

                I am not for coughing in your face or anything, but the alcohol prohibition laws got started with women. Not sure what coughing from some jerk has to do with what I said. I have to give points to women with the anti alcohol movement as they said hashish was a good alternative. Little known fact. They had around 1000 hash joints/bars around NYC early 1900's.

                Women have more nurture than men and when a murderer gets sentenced, the mother of the killer seldom says 'give him the maximum!' or will even admit her child has done the crime quite often. Has nothing to do with logic or being right.

                There are some on death row or life in prison that are innocent. There are quite a few that are guilty beyond any doubt, they have dna, multiple witnesses, video and other evidence. They are not getting put down either and should for such as happened in Compton. I am not for killing everyone that murders but some do deserve it.

                I see Subhuman is still the same, dreaming of anal rape in prison. We know what happened to him when he 'went away'. Explains the impotent rage.

                "Why would the Compton shooter be more deserving than a willingly negligent mass murderer?" I can not tell you, and never implied anything like that. I saw a guy try to kill a couple cops who never did anything to him afik. If killing such a 'person' is an unreasonable response I do not know what to say.

                When you fail to execute such people you send a message to the next turd that has a similar idea. That he will just spend some time in prison and lift weights and get strong and love on Sub.

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                  #23
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qrr_YWBRlx4
                  If all things were turned to smoke, the nostrils would distinguish them.

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                    #24
                    - all you need to do is look at the violent crime stats in any nation to know that men can be much more of a problem - and more dangerous - and more violent than women - the violent crimes men perpetrate towards women and children is way far in excess - of any violent crimes women or kids might perpetrate on men -

                    - I'm a man - and know that for a fact -

                    - So it leads me to think that women would be more peaceful leaders over men -

                    - Human societies have had to be strong and violent to survive in the past - and even today most all societies are patriarchal - perhaps because of that - but as the more advanced nations have noticed - we need peace for progress - not wars - so that makes violence obsolete - and a bane to any forward thinking egalitarian minded person -

                    - Without women - we would have no Mothers - and the warmth and care and understanding of a Mother is what most of us have been lucky enough to have been exposed to as children - That same caring attitude is also needed out in all society - so that we all feel like there is someone who really cares in control - and not just a bunch of fella's all locking and loading, ready to go 'over the top' in some far off foreign land - to save our freedom - or some other B.S -

                    - Women make up half or more of the population - so I would expect them to be a political force - given half a chance - since the women in the western world - have only had the luxury of voting for the last hundred years -
                    Last edited by Gypsy Nirvana; 09-17-2020, 12:02.
                    'It can all start from a seed'

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                      #25
                      today's politically correct society has put many unqualified women into positions of power they have no business being in..The abuse is rampant and now we have unstable, angry racist women in positions of power who are causing trouble..look at some of the female prosecutors and their politically charged agenda's...its fucking disgusting, these bitches only are where they are due to gender and skin color, not talent or skill..

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Gypsy Nirvana View Post
                        - all you need to do is look at the violent crime stats in any nation to know that men can be much more of a problem - and more dangerous - and more violent than women - the violent crimes men perpetrate towards women and children is way far in excess - of any violent crimes women or kids might perpetrate on men -

                        - I'm a man - and know that for a fact -

                        - So it leads me to think that women would be more peaceful leaders over men -

                        - Human societies have had to be strong and violent to survive in the past - and even today most all societies are patriarchal - perhaps because of that - but as the more advanced nations have noticed - we need peace for progress - not wars - so that makes violence obsolete - and a bane to any forward thinking egalitarian minded person -

                        - Without women - we would have no Mothers - and the warmth and care and understanding of a Mother is what most of us have been lucky enough to have been exposed to as children - That same caring attitude is also needed out in all society - so that we all feel like there is someone who really cares in control - and not just a bunch of fella's all locking and loading, ready to go 'over the top' in some far off foreign land - to save our freedom - or some other B.S -

                        - Women make up half or more of the population - so I would expect them to be a political force - given half a chance - since the women in the western world - have only had the luxury of voting for the last hundred years -
                        i'm out of rep per usual...dammit!
                        smoking more pot is NOT the answer to my problems. my problem is that i need more problems that smoking more pot IS the answer to...

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                          #27
                          I suggest we let people's skills and talents dictate a persons position in life, not their skin color or gender, assuming that because someone is female automatically makes them more qualified to be a leader is dangerous and leads to what we are seeing today where women are put into positions of power based off their gender and sometimes the combination of gender and skin color .

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by oldschoolnitro View Post
                            I suggest we let people's skills and talents dictate a persons position in life, not their skin color or gender, assuming that because someone is female automatically makes them more qualified to be a leader is dangerous and leads to what we are seeing today where women are put into positions of power based off their gender and sometimes the combination of gender and skin color .
                            - Hmm - I didn't state that being female automatically makes them more qualified to be a better leader - was just stating that on average we see more warmth, care and understanding from women - and maybe that is what the world needs more of right now?
                            'It can all start from a seed'

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Gypsy Nirvana View Post
                              - Hmm - I didn't state that being female automatically makes them more qualified to be a better leader - was just stating that on average we see more warmth, care and understanding from women - and maybe that is what the world needs more of right now?
                              I get it, and to a degree I agree with you... but I also think women can be more emotionally polarized with videos all over Youtube showing women not only violently assaulting each other but also assaulting each other in front children..

                              but the reality is many women have gained positions of power simply based off gender and skin color and once they gained those positions they abused their power and did a terrible job..look at some of the female prosecutors... gained position for all the wrong reasons

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by amanda88 View Post
                                The best and worst part about being a professional troublemaker is that the trouble never ends, Cecile Richards writes in her new memoir, Make Trouble.
                                View Image
                                She should know. Though she is now president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Richard’s leadership and activism, organizing and civil disobedience in the name of social justice, spans virtually her entire life. Even before the work with women’s reproductive rights, her career took her from worksites in New Orleans and East Texas, where she organized hotel and nursing home workers, to Washington, D.C., where during a gap year from college she was involved in efforts to implement Title IX, the law, passed five years earlier, requiring men and women have equal opportunity to education.

                                As head of what is perhaps the most visible symbol of feminism in this country, Richards routinely faces down attacks from anti-abortion and far-right foes and has fended off repeated efforts to defund and derail the women’s healthcare organization. Perhaps no single episode has raised her public profile as much as the five-hour grilling she endured by Republican male members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee in 2015.

                                “Here’s what I learned sitting in front of that committee,” Richards writes in her book, Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead. “Focus on the people who are counting on you, not the ones who are trying to drag you down.”

                                Now, as she prepares to leave Planned Parenthood after 12 years, her sentiments about never-ending trouble seem inarguable. Uncertainty hangs over women’s rights issues in this country, from reproductive health to the gender pay gap. The Guttmacher Institute reports that, between 2010 and 2016, states enacted more than 330 measures to restrict abortion access. Meanwhile, the #MeToo movement continues to unmask a sexist, if not misogynistic, underbelly.

                                “For the first time in my life, I’m wondering whether my own daughters will have fewer rights than I’ve had,” writes Richards, the mother of two daughters and a son. “That alone is enough motivation for me to keep making trouble.”

                                You could say she was born into her role of troublemaker. Her mother was the late Ann Richards, who turned a career as a homemaker in a conservative state into one of progressive activism and politics to become the first female governor of modern-era Texas. Her name had become familiar to Americans during the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta when she famously derided then-Republican presidential nominee George H.W. Bush: “Poor George. He was born with a silver foot in his mouth.”

                                She describes a life surrounded by kickass women. “At every job I’ve had, I’ve tried to work for someone who could teach me something—and more often than not that someone has been a woman.”

                                At age 16, she worked on the Texas House of Representatives campaign of Sarah Weddington, the ambitious young attorney who had argued the case of Jane Roe in Roe v Wade before the U.S Supreme Court in 1973. “It was a really tough race, and I saw firsthand how ugly it could be for a woman to run for office,” she says.

                                She worked in the office of Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the highest-ranking woman in the U.S House of Representatives, admiring her courage and determination in going against her party leadership on the invasion of Iraq and then persuading the majority of House Democrats to go along with her in voting against it. She crisscrossed the country campaigning for Hillary Clinton in battleground states. Speaking at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in 2016 Richards said, “Tonight we are closer than ever to putting a woman in the White House. And I can almost hear mom saying, ‘well, it sure took y’all long enough.”
                                View Image
                                Of course, that didn’t happen.

                                After the election, Planned Parenthood was heading into a “battle of a lifetime,” she wrote. As a candidate, Trump promised to defund the organization, and House Speaker Paul Ryan vowed to repeal Obamacare.

                                But her organization was used to this. At one point, four congressional committees were investigating it, more than were assigned to investigate Enron in the 2008 global financial crisis.

                                With more than 100 years of research in reproductive health, Planned Parenthood is the nation’s largest provider of sex education resources and affordable health care—for both men and women. In 2016, it served more than 2.4 million patients.

                                When a Republican-controlled Congress passed a bill to defund it in 2015, President Obama vetoed it. Nearly every “knock-down-drag-out fight over the Affordable Care Act had to do with women’s health,” she writes.

                                She recalls a scene in the Capitol visitor center before a news conference to announce Planned Parenthood’s support for Obamacare. Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, the longest-serving woman in Congress, jumped up on her trademark step stool, pulled out her bright red lipstick, and smearing it on declared, “Get ready women, we are going to war.”

                                Just before passage of Obamacare, a last-minute proposal was introduced, with support from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, to prevent insurance plans from covering abortions under the law. The Stupak Amendment, as it was called, went against everything Planned Parenthood stood for. Eventually it was removed, but only after intense lobbying.

                                “Without the women in the House and Senate, it would have been a different story,” Richards writes. “I firmly believe that when half of Congress can get pregnant, we will finally stop arguing about birth control, abortions and Planned Parenthood—and we might even fully fund women’s health care.”

                                Richards believes that now, more than ever, women are the most important political force in America. “We have enormous power to change the direction of this country, and its time to use it.”

                                Ann Richards’ 1991 gubernatorial campaign was an inspiration to women across Texas and beyond. “Everywhere I went, women my mom’s age and with her hairdo would grab me by the arm and say, “I never thought I’d see the day".

                                (https://www.alternet.org/news-amp-po...-force-america)
                                What if she decides she's a man now mid term?
                                I eat legos

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