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    Applications Aeolus shines a light on polar vortex

    04/02/2021 2719 views 79 likes
    ESA / Applications / Observing the Earth / Aeolus
    As this winter’s polar vortex currently sends extreme icy blasts of Arctic weather to some parts of the northern hemisphere such as the northeast of the US, scientists are using wind information from ESA’s Aeolus satellite to shed more light on this complex phenomenon.

    The polar vortex is a huge mass of frigid air high above the North Pole in the polar stratosphere. It is surrounded by a strong jet of air swirling counter-clockwise along the vortex’s boundary. The vortex tends to be much stronger in the winter, keeping bitter cold air locked in around the Arctic.
    However, sometimes the vortex can weaken, become distorted or even split into two and meander further south, affecting the weather and jetstream further down in the troposphere, potentially bringing unusually cold weather and snow to lower latitudes.

    Polar vortex 1 December 2020 to 1 February 2021 One meteorological event that can disturb the polar vortex is known as a ‘sudden stratospheric warming’, which is what has been happening over the last month. Sudden stratospheric warmings happen to some extent every other year or so, but the current event has been categorised as major, and is less common.
    Such dramatic events cause the strong wind around the edge of the polar vortex to weaken or reverse, leading the temperature of the polar stratosphere to rise rapidly by up to 50°C degrees Celsius over several days.
    Since these events can trigger extreme weather in Europe and North America, they are of scientific and practical interest. However, the processes involved are not fully understood, and until recently there have been major technical challenges in measuring wind from space, which is needed to measure and monitor such a large-scale event.


    Polar vortex change Fortunately, scientists now have ESA’s Aeolus satellite at hand to help understand more about why and how the polar vortex is pushed off balance.
    Aeolus is the first satellite in orbit to profile directly Earth’s winds from space.
    It works by emitting short, powerful pulses of ultraviolet light from a laser and measures the Doppler shift from the very small amount of light that is scattered back to the instrument from molecules and particles to deliver profiles of the horizontal speed of the world’s winds mostly in the east-west direction in the lowermost 26 km of the atmosphere.
    Although Aeolus only measures wind in the lower part of the atmosphere, the lower part of the current stratospheric polar vortex jet leaves a signature in the satellite’s data.
    Corwin Wright, Royal Society research fellow at the University of Bath in the UK, said, “Changes in the wind structure in a sudden stratospheric warming event have never been observed directly at a global scale before. So far, our understanding of these changes has been developed using point measurements, measurements along localised aircraft flight tracks, through the use of temperature observations, and, primarily, computer models and assimilative analyses.

    Profiling the world's winds “However, we can now exploit novel measurements from Aeolus, the first satellite capable of observing winds directly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, to study this process observationally during this current major event.”
    Anne Grete Straume, ESA’s Aeolus mission scientist, commented, “We are currently observing a polar vortex event where we see it split into two, with one spinning mass of air over the North Atlantic and one over the North Pacific.
    “The split leads to changes in the tropospheric circulation allowing cold air masses from the poles to more easily escape down to lower latitudes. At the moment, parts of North America seem to be experiencing colder weather than Europe, although we have seen events of cold air reaching quite far south in Europe over the past few weeks causing, for example, heavy snowfall in Spain.


    Snow near Great Lakes “What scientists would also like to understand is whether sudden stratospheric warming events might become more frequent owing to climate change. Also for this, Aeolus wind data will be very important to better understand the mechanisms triggering these weather events.
    “It is early days yet to draw any scientific conclusions from our Aeolus data, but work is certainly underway to shed new light on why this seasonal phenomenon can sometimes be extreme – watch this space.”


    https://www.esa.int/Applications/Obs...n_polar_vortex
    "when i run outta weed, i smoke match sticks...
    that first hit is FIRE!!!"


    "I'm not always a dick...but when I am, I drink cheap beer".

    Comment


      Glacial episodes of a freshwater Arctic Ocean covered by a thick ice shelf
      Nature volume 590, pages97–102(2021)Cite this article

      Abstract

      Following early hypotheses about the possible existence of Arctic ice shelves in the past1,2,3, the observation of specific erosional features as deep as 1,000 metres below the current sea level confirmed the presence of a thick layer of ice on the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean and elsewhere4,5,6. Recent modelling studies have addressed how an ice shelf may have built up in glacial periods, covering most of the Arctic Ocean7,8. So far, however, there is no irrefutable marine-sediment characterization of such an extensive ice shelf in the Arctic, raising doubt about the impact of glacial conditions on the Arctic Ocean. Here we provide evidence for at least two episodes during which the Arctic Ocean and the adjacent Nordic seas were not only covered by an extensive ice shelf, but also filled entirely with fresh water, causing a widespread absence of thorium-230 in marine sediments. We propose that these Arctic freshwater intervals occurred 70,000–62,000 years before present and approximately 150,000–131,000 years before present, corresponding to portions of marine isotope stages 4 and 6. Alternative interpretations of the first occurrence of the calcareous nannofossil Emiliania huxleyi in Arctic sedimentary records would suggest younger ages for the older interval. Our approach explains the unexpected minima in Arctic thorium-230 records9 that have led to divergent interpretations of sedimentation rates10,11 and hampered their use for dating purposes. About nine million cubic kilometres of fresh water is required to explain our isotopic interpretation, a calculation that we support with estimates of hydrological fluxes and altered boundary conditions. A freshwater mass of this size—stored in oceans, rather than land—suggests that a revision of sea-level reconstructions based on freshwater-sensitive stable oxygen isotopes may be required, and that large masses of fresh water could be delivered to the north Atlantic Ocean on very short timescales.


      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03186-y
      ////////

      Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find

      13 January 2021
      Scientists claim to have found the ‘missing link’ in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth.
      Melting icebergs in the Antarctic are the key, say the team from Cardiff University, triggering a series of chain reactions that plunges Earth into a prolonged period of cold temperatures.
      The findings have been published today in Nature from an international consortium of scientists from universities around the world.
      It has long been known that ice age cycles are paced by periodic changes to Earth’s orbit of the sun, which subsequently changes the amount of solar radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface.
      However, up until now it has been a mystery as to how small variations in solar energy can trigger such dramatic shifts in the climate on Earth.
      In their study, the team propose that when the orbit of Earth around the sun is just right, Antarctic icebergs begin to melt further and further away from Antarctica, shifting huge volumes of freshwater away from the Southern Ocean and into the Atlantic Ocean.
      As the Southern Ocean gets saltier and the North Atlantic gets fresher, large-scale ocean circulation patterns begin to dramatically change, pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere and reducing the so-called greenhouse effect.
      This in turn pushes the Earth into ice age conditions.
      As part of their study the scientists used multiple techniques to reconstruct past climate conditions, which included identifying tiny fragments of Antarctic rock dropped in the open ocean by melting icebergs.
      The rock fragments were obtained from sediments recovered by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 361, representing over 1.6 million years of history and one of the longest detailed archives of Antarctic icebergs.
      The study found that these deposits, known as Ice-Rafted Debris, appeared to consistently lead to changes in deep ocean circulation, reconstructed from the chemistry of tiny deep-sea fossils called foraminifera.
      The team also used new climate model simulations to test their hypothesis, finding that huge volumes of freshwater could be moved by the icebergs.
      Lead author of the study Aidan Starr, from Cardiff University’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said: “We were astonished to find that this lead-lag relationship was present during the onset of every ice age for the last 1.6 million years."
      Such a leading role for the Southern Ocean and Antarctica in global climate has been speculated but seeing it so clearly in geological evidence was very exciting.
      Aidan Starr
      Professor Ian Hall, co-author of the study and co-chief scientist of the IODP Expedition, also from the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said: “Our results provide the missing link into how Antarctica and the Southern Ocean responded to the natural rhythms of the climate system associated with our orbit around the sun.”
      Over the past 3 million years the Earth has regularly plunged into ice age conditions, but at present is currently situated within an interglacial period where temperatures are warmer.
      However, due to the increased global temperatures resulting from anthropogenic CO2 emissions, the researchers suggest the natural rhythm of ice age cycles may be disrupted as the Southern Ocean will likely become too warm for Antarctic icebergs to travel far enough to trigger the changes in ocean circulation required for an ice age to develop.
      Professor Hall believes that the results can be used to understand how our climate may respond to anthropogenic climate change in the future.
      “Likewise as we observe an increase in the mass loss from the Antarctic continent and iceberg activity in the Southern Ocean, resulting from warming associated with current human greenhouse-gas emissions, our study emphasises the importance of understanding iceberg trajectories and melt patterns in developing the most robust predictions of their future impact on ocean circulation and climate,” he said.
      The Cardiff University-led study was funded by NERC.

      https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/news/view/...cientists-find
      /////////////
      Researchers Link Ice-Age Climate-Change Records to Ocean Salinity


      Water is saltier during cold, fresher with tropical rain


      October 4, 2006
      Sudden decreases in temperature over Greenland and tropical rainfall patterns during the last Ice Age have been linked for the first time to rapid changes in the salinity of the north Atlantic Ocean, according to research published Oct. 5, 2006, in the journal Nature. The results provide further evidence that ocean circulation and chemistry respond to changes in climate.
      Using chemical traces in fossil shells of microscopic planktonic life forms, called formanifera, in deep-sea sediment cores, scientists reconstructed a 45,000- to 60,000-year-old record of ocean temperature and salinity. They compared their results to the record of abrupt climate change recorded in ice cores from Greenland. They found the Atlantic got saltier during cold periods, and fresher during warm intervals.
      "The freshening likely reflects shifts in rainfall patterns, mostly in the tropics," Howard Spero of the University of California at Davis said. "Suddenly, we're looking at a record that links moisture balance in the tropics to climate change. And the most striking thing is that a measurable transition is happening over decades."
      Spero, who is currently on leave at the National Science Foundation's Marine Geology and Geophysics Program, worked with lead author Matthew Schmidt of the Georgia Institute of Technology and Maryline Vautravers of Cambridge University in the United Kingdom to conduct the research.
      During the Ice Age, much of North America and Europe was covered by a sheet of ice. But the ice records the scientists reconstructed show repeated patterns of sudden warming, called Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles, when temperatures in Greenland rose by 5 to 10 degrees Celsius over a few decades.
      Close to the tropics, warm, moist air forms a zone of heavy tropical rainfall, called the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which dilutes the salty ocean with fresh water. Today, the tropical rainfall zone reaches into the northern Caribbean, but during the colder periods of the Ice Age it was pushed much further south, towards Brazil. That kept fresh water out of the northern Atlantic, so it became more salty, Spero said.
      The circulation, or gyre, in the North Atlantic moves warm, salty water north, keeping Europe relatively temperate. The deep ocean circulation is very sensitive to the saltiness of north Atlantic surface waters, Spero said. Warming climate, higher rainfall and fresher conditions can alter the circulation. During glacial times, reduced circulation caused climate to cool.
      The new results show that as the climate cooled in Greenland, salinity rapidly increased in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. The build-up of salt during these cold intervals when the conveyor circulation was reduced would have primed the system to quickly restart on transitions into warm intervals, Schmidt said. However, the actual trigger that caused Atlantic circulation to restart during the Ice Age is still unknown, he said.
      Once warming began, melting ice sheets would have contributed fresh water to the Atlantic, but this would have been partly buffered by the elevated saltiness of the Atlantic.
      The research was supported by the National Science Foundation.

      https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=108053
      //////////

      US Deploys B-1 Bombers To Norway For First Time Amid Russia's Arctic Ambitions

      by Tyler Durden

      Thursday, Feb 04, 2021 - 4:15
      In recent years there's been a noticeable uptick in large-scale NATO exercises in the Barents region in response to what's perceived as Russia's own arctic ambitions to militarize the far north.
      And now the US Air Force has announced that for the first time ever it will deploy B-1 Lancer bombers along with 200 airmen to Norway, no doubt in order to "confront Russia".
      "More than 200 Air Force personnel from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, were expected to arrive at Orland Air Base with an expeditionary B-1 Lancer bomber squadron to support missions in the region, U.S. European Command said in a statement Tuesday," according to Stars and Stripes.

      B-1 Lancer, US Air Force imageUS European Command (EUCOM), which made the announcement this week didn't indicate how long they would be deployed, only saying "scheduled missions" will occur for "a limited time".
      The US and Norwegian air forces have conducted long-range northern air patrols before, but this marks the first time American bombers will fly out of Norway, something sure to gain Russia's attention.
      The move comes following the US Air Force and Navy recently publishing new Arctic defense strategies, in July and January respectively, also amid increased Pentagon cooperation with Norway, among the founding member countries of NATO.
      The Navy's strategy, A Blue Arctic: A Strategic Blueprint for the Arctic is based on "an expected rise in the use of Arctic waters for commercial shipping, natural resource exploration, tourism and military presence" which calls for "the Navy and Marine Corps to increase regular presence in the Arctic."

      "Doing so will require the sea services to collaborate with allies as well as domestic partners like the Coast Guard and Alaska law enforcement organizations, and focus research and acquisition decisions on being able to operate successfully in the High North," according to the prior Navy statement.


      https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitic...ctic-ambitions
      "when i run outta weed, i smoke match sticks...
      that first hit is FIRE!!!"


      "I'm not always a dick...but when I am, I drink cheap beer".

      Comment


        Adelaide, South Australia, coolest and wettest week in 49 years, so much for global warming.
        My Grow Setup 2;
        https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=370402



        Originally posted by MOneYMiKe
        But my freedom doesn’t end where your fears begin
        Originally posted by Gypsy Nirvana
        - Can't we all just get a bong?
        Originally posted by flylowgethigh
        ....

        Ya'll free to do what you want, except force your fears onto me.

        Comment


          The global race to produce hydrogen offshore

          Last year was a record breaker for the UK's wind power industry.

          Wind power generation reached its highest ever level, at 17.2GW on 18 December, while wind power achieved its biggest share of UK energy production, at 60% on 26 August.

          Yet occasionally the huge offshore wind farms pump out far more electricity than the country needs - such as during the first Covid-19 lockdown last spring when demand for electricity sagged.

          But what if you could use that excess power for something else?

          "What we're aiming to do is generate hydrogen directly from offshore wind," says Stephen Matthews, managing partner of manufacturing consultancy ERM.

          His firm's project, Dolphyn, aims to fit floating wind turbines with desalination equipment to remove salt from seawater, and electrolysers to split the resulting freshwater into oxygen and the sought-after hydrogen.

          TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE:

          https://finance.yahoo.com/news/globa...001308563.html
          Originally Posted by Pops
          I think that it is great that daisy Jane swallows. I wish I had a woman like that, but it is hard to find someone who likes the taste of rust!
          "Too many good docs are getting out of business. Too many OB/GYNs aren't able to practice their love with women all across this country." — George W. Bush - Sept. 6, 2004, at a rally in Poplar Bluff, Mo.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Frosty Nuggets View Post
            Adelaide, South Australia, coolest and wettest week in 49 years, so much for global warming.
            so far, Australia has done well this year fire wise.

            Just one medium sized wildfire near Perth.


            But Scotland, SHiT - who would think that Scotland catching fire mid-winter is a thing ?

            https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland...lands-56021899
            Never Under-estimate the Psychopathic-ness of a Politician

            who is in Save the Children Mode.

            Comment


              https://www.star-telegram.com/news/l...249193010.html

              Big highway pile-up with lots of deaths, related to unexpected ice on Texas freeway.

              Is ice in Texas REALLY that unusual ? It sure caught hundreds of people by surprise on Thursday Feb. 11.
              Never Under-estimate the Psychopathic-ness of a Politician

              who is in Save the Children Mode.

              Comment


                Originally posted by St. Phatty View Post
                https://www.star-telegram.com/news/l...249193010.html

                Big highway pile-up with lots of deaths, related to unexpected ice on Texas freeway.

                Is ice in Texas REALLY that unusual ? It sure caught hundreds of people by surprise on Thursday Feb. 11.
                probably depends where in Texas
                but this cold wave extended very far south and set records
                so that is unusual
                what week goes by anymore without unusual weather?
                current grow: www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?p=7872194

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Frosty Nuggets View Post
                  Adelaide, South Australia, coolest and wettest week in 49 years, so much for global warming.
                  1 week variation does nothing to disprove a theory...
                  smoking more pot is NOT the answer to my problems. my problem is that i need more problems that smoking more pot IS the answer to...

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by St. Phatty View Post
                    https://www.star-telegram.com/news/l...249193010.html

                    Big highway pile-up with lots of deaths, related to unexpected ice on Texas freeway.

                    Is ice in Texas REALLY that unusual ? It sure caught hundreds of people by surprise on Thursday Feb. 11.
                    it went from rain to freezing rain to black ice within minutes. yeah, it WILL catch you by surprise like that. one minute wet, next thing you know "oh FUCKKKKK!" Mother Nature does shit like that, old bitch.
                    smoking more pot is NOT the answer to my problems. my problem is that i need more problems that smoking more pot IS the answer to...

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by trichrider View Post
                      View Image Applications Aeolus shines a light on polar vortex

                      04/02/2021 2719 views 79 likes
                      ESA / Applications / Observing the Earth / Aeolus
                      As this winter’s polar vortex currently sends extreme icy blasts of Arctic weather to some parts of the northern hemisphere such as the northeast of the US, scientists are using wind information from ESA’s Aeolus satellite to shed more light on this complex phenomenon.

                      The polar vortex is a huge mass of frigid air high above the North Pole in the polar stratosphere. It is surrounded by a strong jet of air swirling counter-clockwise along the vortex’s boundary. The vortex tends to be much stronger in the winter, keeping bitter cold air locked in around the Arctic.
                      However, sometimes the vortex can weaken, become distorted or even split into two and meander further south, affecting the weather and jetstream further down in the troposphere, potentially bringing unusually cold weather and snow to lower latitudes.

                      View Image Polar vortex 1 December 2020 to 1 February 2021 One meteorological event that can disturb the polar vortex is known as a ‘sudden stratospheric warming’, which is what has been happening over the last month. Sudden stratospheric warmings happen to some extent every other year or so, but the current event has been categorised as major, and is less common.
                      Such dramatic events cause the strong wind around the edge of the polar vortex to weaken or reverse, leading the temperature of the polar stratosphere to rise rapidly by up to 50°C degrees Celsius over several days.
                      Since these events can trigger extreme weather in Europe and North America, they are of scientific and practical interest. However, the processes involved are not fully understood, and until recently there have been major technical challenges in measuring wind from space, which is needed to measure and monitor such a large-scale event.

                      View Image
                      Polar vortex change Fortunately, scientists now have ESA’s Aeolus satellite at hand to help understand more about why and how the polar vortex is pushed off balance.
                      Aeolus is the first satellite in orbit to profile directly Earth’s winds from space.
                      It works by emitting short, powerful pulses of ultraviolet light from a laser and measures the Doppler shift from the very small amount of light that is scattered back to the instrument from molecules and particles to deliver profiles of the horizontal speed of the world’s winds mostly in the east-west direction in the lowermost 26 km of the atmosphere.
                      Although Aeolus only measures wind in the lower part of the atmosphere, the lower part of the current stratospheric polar vortex jet leaves a signature in the satellite’s data.
                      Corwin Wright, Royal Society research fellow at the University of Bath in the UK, said, “Changes in the wind structure in a sudden stratospheric warming event have never been observed directly at a global scale before. So far, our understanding of these changes has been developed using point measurements, measurements along localised aircraft flight tracks, through the use of temperature observations, and, primarily, computer models and assimilative analyses.

                      Profiling the world's winds “However, we can now exploit novel measurements from Aeolus, the first satellite capable of observing winds directly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, to study this process observationally during this current major event.”
                      Anne Grete Straume, ESA’s Aeolus mission scientist, commented, “We are currently observing a polar vortex event where we see it split into two, with one spinning mass of air over the North Atlantic and one over the North Pacific.
                      “The split leads to changes in the tropospheric circulation allowing cold air masses from the poles to more easily escape down to lower latitudes. At the moment, parts of North America seem to be experiencing colder weather than Europe, although we have seen events of cold air reaching quite far south in Europe over the past few weeks causing, for example, heavy snowfall in Spain.

                      View Image
                      Snow near Great Lakes “What scientists would also like to understand is whether sudden stratospheric warming events might become more frequent owing to climate change. Also for this, Aeolus wind data will be very important to better understand the mechanisms triggering these weather events.
                      “It is early days yet to draw any scientific conclusions from our Aeolus data, but work is certainly underway to shed new light on why this seasonal phenomenon can sometimes be extreme – watch this space.”


                      https://www.esa.int/Applications/Obs...n_polar_vortex
                      Yep I remember quite vividly three yrs ago a winter where we went -10 or colder for almost two weeks ....the vortex is no joke
                      I eat legos

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by armedoldhippy View Post
                        it went from rain to freezing rain to black ice within minutes. yeah, it WILL catch you by surprise like that. one minute wet, next thing you know "oh FUCKKKKK!" Mother Nature does shit like that, old bitch.
                        Snotsicicles are a thing

                        Noun. snotsicle (plural snotsicles) (informal) A solidly frozen trail of mucus from the nose.
                        I eat legos

                        Comment


                          I wonder how many CA potheads who moved to OK are wondering what the F they were thinking, as the polar Vortex rolls in?
                          ______________________________ __________________________
                          Dr. Tuggle's Compound Syrup of Globe Flower

                          https://youtu.be/x0BinEFCp38?t=74

                          https://youtu.be/NUmIO_MG5IU?t=87

                          Comment


                            [youtubeif]8gI6q4R8ih4[/youtubeif]
                            Warmest Tent on Earth - Pitching in the Siberian Arctic Winter

                            fascinating documentary, life on the tundra.
                            "when i run outta weed, i smoke match sticks...
                            that first hit is FIRE!!!"


                            "I'm not always a dick...but when I am, I drink cheap beer".

                            Comment


                              1000 Extra Marines "Stay Put" In Norway As Russia Ramps Up Bomber 'Warning' Flights In Arctic

                              Sunday, Feb 21, 2021 - 8:45
                              In a hugely significant move that will put Russia-Europe relations further on edge amid an ongoing build-up of NATO forces along sensitive border regions, the large contingent of Marines that arrived in Norway last month are now expected to stay for an indefinite period.
                              "About 1,000 Marines who arrived in Norway last month — only to have their military exercises canceled due to the pandemic — will remain in the country for arctic training," Military.com reports based on Marine Corps statements.


                              They plan to stay and engage in "valuable arctic and mountain warfare training" through at least the springtime. The deployed units are mostly from the 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines but will now essentially "stay put".
                              Marines have been training on a rotational basis in Norway for years, but the reality is their stays and rotations have been increasingly extended over the past years. Moscow has meanwhile condemned a 'Cold War' style build-up near the Arctic Circle, where it also frequently conducts military exercises.
                              The AFP wrote that Russia is "fuming", citing a Russian ambassador to say
                              "Nobody in the Arctic is preparing for an armed conflict. However, there are signs of mounting tension and military escalation," Russia's ambassador to the Arctic Council, Nikolai Korchunov, said.
                              The current militarization in the region "could turn us back decades to the days of the Cold War," he told Russia's RIA news agency in early February.
                              Via ReutersAs we described earlier this month, the US Air Force for the first time ever sent multiple B-1 Lancer bombers along with 200 airmen to Norway, which came amid greater NATO calls to "confront Russia".
                              And now just days ago, Forbes detailed that in response "the Russian air force is mobilizing its own warplanes. Fighters to intercept the B-1. And bombers to strike back."

                              Here's more on Russia's response:
                              After the U.S. Air Force announced the B-1 deployment, the Russian air force wasted no time sortieing its own bombers. Two of the service’s Tu-160 heavy bombers flew an epic, 12-hour sweep of Northern Europe, the Kremlin announced on Feb. 9.
                              The 6,000-mile round-trip took the swing-wing Tu-160s from their base at Engels in western Russia north to the Arctic Ocean then west to Svalbard, south into the Norwegian Sea, east along the Norwegian coast and finally south back to Engels.
                              A pair of MiG-31 interceptors flying from Rogachevo air base in northern Russian briefly escorted the bombers as they roared across the Kara Sea toward the Arctic.
                              And not helping this Cold War style throwback, President Biden on Friday warned a global audience of Russian "bullying" and "autocracy".
                              "The trans-Atlantic alliance is back," he said before the Munich Security Conference in words intended to restore trust from European allies in NATO.


                              https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitic...flights-arctic
                              "when i run outta weed, i smoke match sticks...
                              that first hit is FIRE!!!"


                              "I'm not always a dick...but when I am, I drink cheap beer".

                              Comment


                                evening y'all, time for an interesting moment up north
                                as we recall we have just seen one bad ass polar vortex come down to USA land
                                brutal sucker
                                now this appears to be a first, the vortex occurrence looks very well correlated with a dramatic dip in ice extent at the arctic icecap
                                not official, we'll have to see on that one
                                but still a wow moment
                                Attached Files
                                current grow: www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?p=7872194

                                Comment

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