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    Was talking to a vegan friend. Y'all can guess about what, yah? Any route, He was statting me about life expectancy.
    Claims to have solid proof that eating bacon will shorten ones life by a specific number of years.
    Hmmm. If this is true. I get to live longer in a world without bacon!?
    Long but miserable is not my end goal.
    Trade it for short, but sweet, any day.



    Does not mean I'm rejecting the statement, just it's implications, yah?


    Some of the pseudoscience may have merit.
    God knows I laughed heartily when told that cannabis concentrate can put "incurable cancer into remission.
    I had plenty cannabis, time on my hands, a marker to chart progress, and there was minimum risk to my health.

    Came into it as a total skeptic.
    Happily, seems I was wrong about that.


    That said, there are so many ways to skin cats that I have not stopped searching. May be something even better. May be something that enhances the cannabinoids, ah dunno.


    Basically, that's why I'm lurking here. If I keep my mind open, I learn. What I learn, I share.

    If you hit remission right away, I might be ordering broccoli seeds, then posting the results.
    Of course, I'd mash, extract, and encapsulate the sprouts. (Broccoli makes me gag).

    On this site, folks from all across the globe will gather to help you.

    Renews my faith in people.



    I know enough science to understand the risks of some suggested treatments and the silliness of some others.

    Still, try to keep an open mind about all of it.

    Why? Well, I was wrong about cannabis, yah?


    Aloha,
    Weeze
    "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."
    - Mark Twain

    "Plants do things for a reason, they don't just decide one day to get root rot or act funny." -Weedhound
    R.I.P

    A prudent question is one-half of wisdom. -Francis Bacon

    A wise man is superior to any insults which can be put upon him, and the best reply to unseemly behavior is patience and moderation. -Moliere


    You're behaving as if there is no hope. Someone musta told you you were hopeless and you believed them! That's it, isn't it? What you believe about yrself rests on a pile of someone else's shit! - Teddybrae

    Comment


      why are you not grinding the flowers and putting them into capsules?

      Comment


        Originally posted by trichrider View Post
        why are you not grinding the flowers and putting them into capsules?
        It hadn't really occurred to me, other than knowing that in a pinch, I can certainly chew flowers if needed.

        Aside from that, to grind over a gram of CBD or THC flowers, and load the ground vegetative matter into capsules, would use, probably, upwards of 5-8 of my veggie gelatin capsules at a time, so I didn't even consider it.

        The health food store I go to for a limited number of items was also limited on their larger bags of the capsules I purchased.

        Same for their various forms of lecithin. As a matter of attempting to stay more traditional, I had hoped to obtain some soy lecithin (liquid form). Nope, they were all out.

        COVID-19 seems to have impacted the supply of all -sorts- of things that we might not initially consider.

        In the end, I occasionally lick a bit of the sunflower lecithin 'glue' from a finger when eating my flowers.

        And, if nothing else, I had a thought about orally-sourced enzymes and their roles in breaking down and making food stuffs (or what ever) more bio-available....

        So I chew this strange-tasting stuff into a moderate density paste, swallow it all down with what ever beverage is in my hand at the moment, call it good, and figure that in the end, I'll probably be the ONLY guy I personally know, who can claim to have eaten well over 1-1/2 lbs. of various decarbed whole flowers while we watched the world and Nation re-shape itself over COVID-19.

        I mean, the odds say that there's likely someone else similar to me, in similar straights out there some place, chewing dried crunchy, crusty flowers, but I haven't bumped into them yet.... yet.

        Thanks for the question, trich.
        Last edited by moose eater; 12-19-2020, 06:03.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Weezard View Post
          Was talking to a vegan friend. Y'all can guess about what, yah? Any route, He was statting me about life expectancy.
          Claims to have solid proof that eating bacon will shorten ones life by a specific number of years.
          Hmmm. If this is true. I get to live longer in a world without bacon!?
          Long but miserable is not my end goal.
          Trade it for short, but sweet, any day.



          Does not mean I'm rejecting the statement, just it's implications, yah?


          Some of the pseudoscience may have merit.
          God knows I laughed heartily when told that cannabis concentrate can put "incurable cancer into remission.
          I had plenty cannabis, time on my hands, a marker to chart progress, and there was minimum risk to my health.

          Came into it as a total skeptic.
          Happily, seems I was wrong about that.


          That said, there are so many ways to skin cats that I have not stopped searching. May be something even better. May be something that enhances the cannabinoids, ah dunno.


          Basically, that's why I'm lurking here. If I keep my mind open, I learn. What I learn, I share.

          If you hit remission right away, I might be ordering broccoli seeds, then posting the results.
          Of course, I'd mash, extract, and encapsulate the sprouts. (Broccoli makes me gag).

          On this site, folks from all across the globe will gather to help you.

          Renews my faith in people.



          I know enough science to understand the risks of some suggested treatments and the silliness of some others.

          Still, try to keep an open mind about all of it.

          Why? Well, I was wrong about cannabis, yah?


          Aloha,
          Weeze
          Yep, simplicity and materials on-hand, often tend to help many of us to disregard efficacy.

          But this whole thing is still new enough, in terms of established, concluded respected science, that even just knowing something as basic as "What is in this that does X, and why?", the truth is that we don't know... From talking or communicating with some fairly well-known names in the medical cannabis field.

          So, we/I keep doing what ever the research seems to indicate is effective or helpful, having looked into a further to make sure we're not simply super gullible.

          ------------------------------------------

          Met with my Anchorage urology surgeon, and between last year and this year, as I noted the last couple times I met with him via something like ZOOM, his whole affect is different. Some of the answers border on quietly surly.

          He changed his numbers for the worse a bit, when we were talking concretely about my desires and his thoughts about possibility.

          He states he can offer me 46% odds of being cancer-free in 3 years, and 29% odds of being cancer-free in 5 years.

          Not exactly "Are you -sure- you don't want to live for forever??"

          I again asked, though more specifically, re. urinary incontinence as a result of radical prostatectomy via a DaVinci Machine/process. He replied that those who undergo this treatment typically have continence in their urine and fecal effluent, or, in other words, no significant expression of enuresis or encopresis,

          HOWEVER(!!!!!!!!!!!)

          He went on to state that in his observation, the majority of his clients never regain the ability to have a spontaneous erection. (!!!!!!)

          Why my angst? Why the increased number of exclamation points in my post?

          Well.... Aside from the number of persons here who state they didn't forfeit natural sexual expression after various forms of treatment, whether radiation or surgery of varieties X, Y, or Z, but the LITERATURE specifically states that incontinence, with a skilled surgeon and proper containment and condition of the cancer, and accepted methodology, not only is a more rare issue or outcome these days, but also mentions the increasing success rates for sexual function and spontaneous erection.

          So, while my reading and research indicates to me that the issue of impotence and incontinence exist on 2 very different levels of possibility after these procedures, the literature still states that impotence is not necessarily an inherent outcome from these procedures, and incontinence, long-term, is now a minor occurrence.

          So, are his skills that much more in question than others' or previously? Is he simply refusing to offer the proverbial moon, so that if there is a problem, then there's less disappointment?

          'Cause when I asked him, half-jokingly, to paint an overly optimistic mind's eye image of my outcomes, he clung to "only providing the truth."

          So are many of these others who have greater reports of success just bullshitting?

          Unknowns DO NOT help to settle me, and the conflicting answers or intel simply often muddies the water, and makes me less settled.

          And that internal emotional reaction to all of this was already wreaking havoc, BIG TIME.

          I was in the kitchen at 5:15 A.M. this morning, looking at the clock, knowing my alarm was going to go off at 6:50 A.M.

          I think I finally fell asleep about a half-hour before my alarm was to go off. After that, I wandered the house after the phone and computer meeting, VERY bummed out.

          So I have made preliminary contact with another couple cancer treatment places in Washington State, that do prostate cancer treatment, and this week-end, I'll get my release of information waivers written, and scanned, then emailed to the respective recipients.

          The current lack of positive intel from the Anchorage surgeon, means that until I can find more reassuring news, I'm most likely going to be doing surgery out of State, in the Seattle area, on my own, from departure from home, right up to recovery and return.

          Fortunately some of the hospitals and clinics I'm reviewing down there have lodging built into the clinic/facility, and though I'm not confident yet, I was reassured that at the one, anyway, rooms are reportedly properly disinfected between guests/patients staying in those facilities.

          In the end, it appears I won't be doing surgery or treatment in Alaska.

          Last, I found a reference to yet ANOTHER treatment modality that looks quite promising, but which the article stated has not been around long enough to have solid numbers on efficacy.

          That system or process is referred to as 'HIFU', which, if I recall correctly, is an acronym for 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' or something like that. Apparently destroys tumors with focused intense sound waves (???? if I read what I read in my earlier state of delirium correctly). Again, reportedly too new to have a lot of really solid data about.

          **Re. different methods, the only extraction technique that really differed much at all in re. to sequence and times, was the article or 2 that expressed some success in decarbing flowers partially, then decarbing the resulting extract partially. And I -think- they had decreased the times to just about half for each phase.
          Last edited by moose eater; 12-19-2020, 06:02.

          Comment


            I'm curious as to how your friend came to the bacon conclusion weezard.if you could give some info on that I'd appreciate it.

            People too often say they would rather enjoy their last days than live longer but what a lot of people don't understand is the pain of a shorter life is.its not like people just fall asleep and die.there is allot of pain involved.i love bacon but I gaurantee if you don't die from a heart attack it's gonna suck and be painful
            I AM THE LIQUOR!
            MASTER OF SHITPUPPETS
            the only difference between me and you is a couple of drinks

            Comment


              https://www.fredhutch.org/en/news/re...tatectomy.html

              Found an article from JAMA re. both urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy procedures for well over 1,200 subjects.

              The author and data are more positive than the Anchorage surgeon, but not necessarily spewing lollipops and rainbows in their numbers, either.

              Still, these are numbers that are slightly less bleak, and slightly closer to what others have reported anecdotally.

              Comment


                I admire how you are being your own advocate. These days it’s a must I guess but tiresome. I’m sending you positive vibes and wish you the best. Happy holidays too
                Life is sudden be ready

                dont count the days make the days count
                Legal medical patient

                _________
                “Make the most you can of the Indian hemp seed and sow it everywhere.” – George Washington
                "Some of my finest hours have been spent on my back veranda, smoking hemp and observing as far as my eye can see." - Thomas Jefferson
                "Two of my favorite things are sitting on my front porch smoking a pipe of sweet hemp, and playing my Hohner harmonica.” – Abraham Lincoln

                Comment


                  And, if nothing else, I had a thought about orally-sourced enzymes and their roles in breaking down and making food stuffs (or what ever) more bio-available....
                  i did, after a minute, consider this as anecdotal.


                  Most THC and CBD oil goes to waste in your body—here’s why

                  Emma StoneOctober 28, 2019

                  If you knew that only 6% of your CBD gummies would enter your bloodstream to do their job, would you still purchase them? Amid the current frenzy surrounding cannabis and its therapeutic benefits, it’s easy to gloss over the bioavailability of cannabis products.
                  Bioavailability refers to the degree and rate at which a substance is absorbed into your bloodstream to be used where needed. Physiological processes and consumption methods can affect cannabis absorption, rendering its effects somewhat hit-and-miss.
                  It’s critical to get clued up about bioavailability in order to maximize the medicinal potency of cannabis. The more bioavailable your cannabis, the lower the quantity of the plant you need to reap its benefits.
                  Related
                  Edibles dosage chart: How strong is your cannabis-infused edible?

                  What factors influence cannabis bioavailability?

                  The surge in cannabis popularity can be partly attributed to the range of consumption methods available. Edibles and tinctures can have less of the stigma traditionally associated with joints. However, when cannabinoids such as CBD and THC are ingested in oil form—oil is also used to make edibles—their bioavailability becomes compromised.
                  CBD and THC oils resist absorption into the bloodstream because the human body is up to 60% water. Basic science—and salad dressing—dictates that oil and water do not mix, and the same is true for cannabis oil and the human body.
                  “Cannabinoids are fat-loving molecules and have to traverse a cellular environment that is aqueous or watery,” explains Dr. Patricia Frye, a member of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians and chief medical officer at Hello MD. When cannabis is consumed as an oil, the onset of effects can become delayed and bioavailability limited.
                  Related
                  A physician’s perspective on optimal cannabis dosing

                  Another phenomenon that limits oil-based cannabis extracts from reaching the bloodstream is the first-pass effect. When cannabis is ingested orally, it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and transported via the portal vein to the liver, where it is metabolized. As a result of this process, only a limited quantity reaches the circulatory system. Since cannabis oil is often taken orally, its efficacy can be hindered.
                  Are some cannabinoids more bioavailable than others?

                  There has been some investigation into CBD, THC, and less into cannabinol, or CBN. Studies have shown that the bioavailability of cannabinoids depends on the method of delivery.
                  When applied as a topical ointment or transdermal patch, CBD can penetrate the tissue ten times more effectively than THC. The same is true of CBN.
                  THC, however, is more bioavailable than CBD when administered orally or delivered via the lungs. A clinical study found that concentrations of THC in the bloodstream appeared 30-50% higher than CBD following oral delivery as a sublingual spray.
                  However, the bioavailability of THC is still limited when consumed orally, averaging only 4-12%. When smoked or vaped, the bioavailability of THC leaps to an average of 30%.
                  Which methods of cannabis consumption optimize bioavailability?

                  Some of the most common and convenient cannabis products, such as capsules, soft gels, tinctures, and edibles, limit bioavailability due to the first pass through the liver. “With edibles, absorption is slow, unpredictable, and highly variable,” says Frye. “Only about 6% of the dose is absorbed. The onset of action can be as long as 6 hours; it’s very easy to take too much, and the effects can last as long as 20 hours!”
                  Oral administration lasts longer than smoking, eliminating the need for frequent dosing. Oral methods also avoid irritation to the airways and the risk of malignancies associated with smoking or vaping.
                  That said, inhaling cannabis guarantees increased bioavailability because molecules are transported by vapor particles directly to the alveoli in the lungs. This allows cannabinoids to rapidly enter the bloodstream without being metabolized by the liver.
                  Related
                  Do cannabis sublingual strips really work? Yes—here’s how

                  Another lesser known method of administration is intranasal delivery, which enables cannabinoids to be easily absorbed with a rapid onset of 10 minutes or less. “Intranasal methods are highly bioavailable at 34-46%,” says Frye. “It’s a particularly helpful mode of delivery for patients who are having a seizure or for patients trying to abort an impending seizure or migraine.”
                  Transdermal patches can be super effective at targeting localized or systemic pain. They allow for a steady infusion of active ingredients to the delivery site, so the patient is unlikely to experience spikes of THC in the bloodstream.
                  Finally, nano-emulsions and micro-emulsions can dramatically increase the stability and bioavailability of cannabinoids. These novel formulations use nanotechnology to offer up to 100% bioavailability. Frye cautions, however, that the research is still scarce. “We don’t know the full extent of how these manipulations affect cannabinoid activity at the cellular level,” she says.
                  What tips or tricks can help increase bioavailability?

                  One method that boosts the absorption of edibles is to combine cannabis product with fats. Frye recommends combining edibles or tinctures with healthy fats such as guacamole, hummus, or dark chocolate. If you’re feeling less virtuous, however, ice cream works as a treat. The same goes for alcohol-based tinctures.
                  For those who smoke or vape, bioavailability can be enhanced by minimizing sidestream loss and increasing the number of puffs. “Using a desktop or handheld vaporizer with flower will eliminate sidestream losses,” Frye advises. If you think you get more bang for your buck by holding your breath, think again. “There is no evidence supporting holding one’s breath for more than 10 secs,” says Frye.
                  Some final words of advice from Dr. Fyre, for those looking to optimize cannabis bioavailability: “The most cost-effective way to use cannabis is not to use more than you need. Less is more,” she says. Due to its biphasic nature, excessive dosing may exacerbate the symptoms you’re trying to alleviate.


                  https://www.leafly.com/news/health/m...-waste-in-body
                  .......

                  Absorption After Ingestion and Sublingual Methods

                  The most common route of CBD oil administration is orally, or through the mouth. When CBD is ingested, it is absorbed by the digestive system. From the stomach, the compounds enter the hepatic portal system, where they are carried through the portal vein into the liver. The liver then metabolizes the CBD molecules, in what’s referred to as the “first pass effect.” CYP450 mixed function oxidases enzymes in the liver act upon CBD, reducing the concentration of the compounds before passing on what remains to the bloodstream.
                  Ingestion, while considered by most to be the easiest administration method, isn’t the most efficient for absorbing high levels of CBD. Studies have found, however, that consuming CBD oil with fatty acids can help bypass first pass metabolism and increase how much CBD is absorbed through ingestion.
                  If CBD oil is held under the tongue for 60 to 90 seconds before being swallowed, the mucus membranes in the mouth can absorb the compounds. This sublingual method allows CBD to completely bypass the digestive system and liver metabolism, so the compounds can avoid being broken down by enzymes and reach the bloodstream more quickly.


                  https://echoconnection.org/cbd-absorbed-body/


                  it appears enzymes from mucous membranes are ill equipped to 'digest' (for want of a better word) cannabinoids without a carrier (fats) and that the liver passes on less than 10%.
                  sublingual, vaping and transdermal patches deliver more effective percentages.
                  good luck with the seattle area clinics...

                  Comment


                    Good information for the most part.
                    It's why we use lecithin for full emulsification.


                    And the following is spot on.



                    “The most cost-effective way to use cannabis is not to use more than you need. Less is more,” she says. Due to its biphasic nature, excessive dosing may exacerbate the symptoms you’re trying to alleviate."


                    Translates to: "More than enough is too much."




                    "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."
                    - Mark Twain

                    "Plants do things for a reason, they don't just decide one day to get root rot or act funny." -Weedhound
                    R.I.P

                    A prudent question is one-half of wisdom. -Francis Bacon

                    A wise man is superior to any insults which can be put upon him, and the best reply to unseemly behavior is patience and moderation. -Moliere


                    You're behaving as if there is no hope. Someone musta told you you were hopeless and you believed them! That's it, isn't it? What you believe about yrself rests on a pile of someone else's shit! - Teddybrae

                    Comment


                      i don't think either of those articles even mentioned lecithin.

                      fats are essential and help your body absorb vitamins etc., also help controlling inflammation...lecithin helps break down fat.
                      i was not crapping on lecithin or its use, wish i had known about it when i was eating oil every day for months...probably wasted most of the oil i ingested because of not being aware.
                      just pointing out how inefficient oral consumption really is.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by trichrider View Post
                        And, if nothing else, I had a thought about orally-sourced enzymes and their roles in breaking down and making food stuffs (or what ever) more bio-available....
                        i did, after a minute, consider this as anecdotal.


                        Most THC and CBD oil goes to waste in your body—here’s why

                        Emma StoneOctober 28, 2019

                        If you knew that only 6% of your CBD gummies would enter your bloodstream to do their job, would you still purchase them? Amid the current frenzy surrounding cannabis and its therapeutic benefits, it’s easy to gloss over the bioavailability of cannabis products.
                        Bioavailability refers to the degree and rate at which a substance is absorbed into your bloodstream to be used where needed. Physiological processes and consumption methods can affect cannabis absorption, rendering its effects somewhat hit-and-miss.
                        It’s critical to get clued up about bioavailability in order to maximize the medicinal potency of cannabis. The more bioavailable your cannabis, the lower the quantity of the plant you need to reap its benefits.
                        Related
                        Edibles dosage chart: How strong is your cannabis-infused edible?

                        What factors influence cannabis bioavailability?

                        The surge in cannabis popularity can be partly attributed to the range of consumption methods available. Edibles and tinctures can have less of the stigma traditionally associated with joints. However, when cannabinoids such as CBD and THC are ingested in oil form—oil is also used to make edibles—their bioavailability becomes compromised.
                        CBD and THC oils resist absorption into the bloodstream because the human body is up to 60% water. Basic science—and salad dressing—dictates that oil and water do not mix, and the same is true for cannabis oil and the human body.
                        “Cannabinoids are fat-loving molecules and have to traverse a cellular environment that is aqueous or watery,” explains Dr. Patricia Frye, a member of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians and chief medical officer at Hello MD. When cannabis is consumed as an oil, the onset of effects can become delayed and bioavailability limited.
                        Related
                        A physician’s perspective on optimal cannabis dosing

                        Another phenomenon that limits oil-based cannabis extracts from reaching the bloodstream is the first-pass effect. When cannabis is ingested orally, it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and transported via the portal vein to the liver, where it is metabolized. As a result of this process, only a limited quantity reaches the circulatory system. Since cannabis oil is often taken orally, its efficacy can be hindered.
                        Are some cannabinoids more bioavailable than others?

                        There has been some investigation into CBD, THC, and less into cannabinol, or CBN. Studies have shown that the bioavailability of cannabinoids depends on the method of delivery.
                        When applied as a topical ointment or transdermal patch, CBD can penetrate the tissue ten times more effectively than THC. The same is true of CBN.
                        THC, however, is more bioavailable than CBD when administered orally or delivered via the lungs. A clinical study found that concentrations of THC in the bloodstream appeared 30-50% higher than CBD following oral delivery as a sublingual spray.
                        However, the bioavailability of THC is still limited when consumed orally, averaging only 4-12%. When smoked or vaped, the bioavailability of THC leaps to an average of 30%.
                        Which methods of cannabis consumption optimize bioavailability?

                        Some of the most common and convenient cannabis products, such as capsules, soft gels, tinctures, and edibles, limit bioavailability due to the first pass through the liver. “With edibles, absorption is slow, unpredictable, and highly variable,” says Frye. “Only about 6% of the dose is absorbed. The onset of action can be as long as 6 hours; it’s very easy to take too much, and the effects can last as long as 20 hours!”
                        Oral administration lasts longer than smoking, eliminating the need for frequent dosing. Oral methods also avoid irritation to the airways and the risk of malignancies associated with smoking or vaping.
                        That said, inhaling cannabis guarantees increased bioavailability because molecules are transported by vapor particles directly to the alveoli in the lungs. This allows cannabinoids to rapidly enter the bloodstream without being metabolized by the liver.
                        Related
                        Do cannabis sublingual strips really work? Yes—here’s how

                        Another lesser known method of administration is intranasal delivery, which enables cannabinoids to be easily absorbed with a rapid onset of 10 minutes or less. “Intranasal methods are highly bioavailable at 34-46%,” says Frye. “It’s a particularly helpful mode of delivery for patients who are having a seizure or for patients trying to abort an impending seizure or migraine.”
                        Transdermal patches can be super effective at targeting localized or systemic pain. They allow for a steady infusion of active ingredients to the delivery site, so the patient is unlikely to experience spikes of THC in the bloodstream.
                        Finally, nano-emulsions and micro-emulsions can dramatically increase the stability and bioavailability of cannabinoids. These novel formulations use nanotechnology to offer up to 100% bioavailability. Frye cautions, however, that the research is still scarce. “We don’t know the full extent of how these manipulations affect cannabinoid activity at the cellular level,” she says.
                        What tips or tricks can help increase bioavailability?

                        One method that boosts the absorption of edibles is to combine cannabis product with fats. Frye recommends combining edibles or tinctures with healthy fats such as guacamole, hummus, or dark chocolate. If you’re feeling less virtuous, however, ice cream works as a treat. The same goes for alcohol-based tinctures.
                        For those who smoke or vape, bioavailability can be enhanced by minimizing sidestream loss and increasing the number of puffs. “Using a desktop or handheld vaporizer with flower will eliminate sidestream losses,” Frye advises. If you think you get more bang for your buck by holding your breath, think again. “There is no evidence supporting holding one’s breath for more than 10 secs,” says Frye.
                        Some final words of advice from Dr. Fyre, for those looking to optimize cannabis bioavailability: “The most cost-effective way to use cannabis is not to use more than you need. Less is more,” she says. Due to its biphasic nature, excessive dosing may exacerbate the symptoms you’re trying to alleviate.


                        https://www.leafly.com/news/health/m...-waste-in-body
                        .......

                        Absorption After Ingestion and Sublingual Methods

                        The most common route of CBD oil administration is orally, or through the mouth. When CBD is ingested, it is absorbed by the digestive system. From the stomach, the compounds enter the hepatic portal system, where they are carried through the portal vein into the liver. The liver then metabolizes the CBD molecules, in what’s referred to as the “first pass effect.” CYP450 mixed function oxidases enzymes in the liver act upon CBD, reducing the concentration of the compounds before passing on what remains to the bloodstream.
                        Ingestion, while considered by most to be the easiest administration method, isn’t the most efficient for absorbing high levels of CBD. Studies have found, however, that consuming CBD oil with fatty acids can help bypass first pass metabolism and increase how much CBD is absorbed through ingestion.
                        If CBD oil is held under the tongue for 60 to 90 seconds before being swallowed, the mucus membranes in the mouth can absorb the compounds. This sublingual method allows CBD to completely bypass the digestive system and liver metabolism, so the compounds can avoid being broken down by enzymes and reach the bloodstream more quickly.


                        https://echoconnection.org/cbd-absorbed-body/


                        it appears enzymes from mucous membranes are ill equipped to 'digest' (for want of a better word) cannabinoids without a carrier (fats) and that the liver passes on less than 10%.
                        sublingual, vaping and transdermal patches deliver more effective percentages.
                        good luck with the seattle area clinics...
                        Thanks, trich.

                        I scanned through much of that, but will admittedly need to come back for a more thorough and slower reading.

                        I'd anecdotally and subjectively perceived a greater effect from eating the decarbed flowers after or along with eating oily nuts, especially macadamias, almonds, and cashews... 3 of the more extremely oily varieties.

                        And now that I've engaged in a relatively abrupt change of diet/additional diet foods, I now have a pretty steady diet of decent nuts to assist in absorption/bioavailability.

                        In re-reading the post, I'll try to see if my intuitive addressing of the oral enzymes has any merit.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by sdd420 View Post
                          I admire how you are being your own advocate. These days it’s a must I guess but tiresome. I’m sending you positive vibes and wish you the best. Happy holidays too
                          Thank you, sdd.

                          When I was a tiny kid, we had a family physician, we all knew his name, he was typically the only guy we saw, no co-signer necessary, and a very family-person-friendly atmosphere; VERY personable.

                          Close to 6 or 7 years ago, I ended up in the ER, after 5 nights of no sleep, and my legs going utterly WONKY with pain and sensations I'd never had. It was spine-injury oriented.

                          I refused to go to the clinic or hospital, as I had no insurance, and just saying, "Hello" in our ER is literally apt to be close to $1,200, without even getting to address the real cause of the visit.

                          Anyway, without having the courage to say so, a family member who works in a methadone program witnessed the attendees implying I was a drug-seeker (*I am, but not THOSE types of drugs, and not on THAT day).

                          The problem, aside from timing, and being in the midst of the opiate 'crisis', was that I had been honest with persons who had likely led fairly narrow lives, and in my honesty, and addressing the tenor of "Maybe he's a drug-seeker", informing them that "Yes, I was indeed a child of the early 1970s, walked a time or 3 on the wild side, but my interests here today have NOTHING to do with that."

                          They gave me an ultrasound exam of my legs to make sure I wouldn't die on their sidewalk outside, and sue them, should a blood clot cut loose in my legs. Then, knowing my primary care Doc was over-seas for another 19 days, released me with 3 days worth of pain meds, some meds to interrupt pain signals that caused a brief transposing of consonants in speech (even on the incredibly light dose I was taking), and also brought on WEIRD dream sequences.

                          Again, that was all on way light doses of this more or less fairly common Rx drug, for which many of these side-effects are well known even before I ever received them.

                          So yeah, 20 years ago, had someone told me that it is almost always advisable to have a witness of credible character with you when you're visiting a hospital or clinic, I'd have questioned their mental health as a matter of paranoia.

                          But referencing what another poster here regards as 'modern Rockefeller-Era Medicine', I can now fully attest to witnesses and personal advocacy in modern health-care being a NECESSITY, if only because in those moments when you MIGHT get screwed around, they're not apt to send you a post card telling you when they're coming.

                          These days I am still (obviously) a serious advocate for myself (most persons do a job for q pay-check, and I figure most Docs, nurses, PA's, etc., are not much different, so we should ALL be looking out for ourselves, if not each other), and I typically, for now, don't take a witness along, violating my own established rules as a result of COVID-19.

                          Likewise, if/when I travel to Seattle/Pac NW for surgery or (????), I'll be going alone, wearing my P100 .3 micron food-grade silicone mask, with a surgical mask on over it, gloves, etc., and looking ornery enough that no one wants to sit near me on the aircraft, in the taxi, at check-in into what ever lodging at the hospital, during the stay, or the reverse course back home, then likely hibernate in our extra bedroom, until we're somewhat sure that I'm not contagious..
                          Last edited by moose eater; 12-20-2020, 00:45.

                          Comment


                            Childhood friend called this morning around 9:00 A.M.

                            Hadn't spoken in most of a decade, if not more. Likely he spoke with another friend from that region and years who shared my predicament.

                            People tend to go about their own ways, never really taking much effort to think about others in an on-going way, then one day hear some news, and suddenly want to reach out.

                            It's a noble gesture, but I find room for resentment in it. This same person had contacted me most of 2 decades ago, to reconnect, and to confess taking my knife my mother had given me when I was about 13. They had, back then, asked if I wanted them to replace the knife, which I privately saw as a bit shallow. I'd later thought, "What, you want forgiveness and a clean slate for taking my heirloom pocket knife, but not sure you want to spend the $35 that might make it right without asking?"

                            Humans; our species can be very short-sighted at times, myself included.

                            Anyway, woke again shortly after about 11:00, with my nerves all fried re. familial losses and conflicts, urgency of treatment, etc.

                            Once again, laid there for several hours trying to clarify or sort and appease the sadness and sense of emotional panic re. the whole mosaic cluster-fuck that is happening at the moment, and again spent a fair bit of time toying with the idea of how much simpler (in some ways) and cleaner this all might be to simply disappear, and shared that with my wife.

                            My younger son is still the major fly in the ointment where shrinking back from more terminal answers; there's images I've seen that I would not subject he or his mother to.

                            So after a bit, I got up, took my supplements and pills, drank a cup of coffee, some RO H2O, slammed a smaller moose meatloaf burger down with some sprouted broccoli seeds littering the top of it, and some reduced sugar ketchup and spicy brown mustard mixed into the sprouts on top.

                            Another half hour of self-talk, and some intense but amicable discourse with my wife, and I can park the 'nuclear option' for another hour or 20, until the next time everything seems to be overwhelming.

                            Now, after all of that, another moment of focusing and rest, the rest of my coffee, a gram+ of CBD flowers, and then, that part of the day we all live for... CHORES!!!

                            Comment


                              after mulling over the inconsistency of oral dosing, i began to wonder why not bypass the liver like is done with sublingual and process that flower material into suppositories and get it as close to the problem area as possible.



                              have you given any consideration to that yet?



                              Do Cannabis Suppositories Work?

                              The low-down on what’s up with rectal and vaginal delivery.

                              By Jelena Grove on July 03, 2019 (Updated on January 14, 2020)



                              The back door is making a comeback - medically speaking.
                              Cannabis suppositories have grown in popularity, but how and to what extent they actually work remains a mystery. With contradictory claims from proponents and skeptics regarding the rectal bioavailability of THC, intoxication (or lack thereof), and alleviation of symptoms of difficult-to-treat diseases, it’s time to get a grip on what we really know about this method of administering cannabis.
                              Clinical research on cannabis suppositories is still limited. Much of the available data pertains to experiments conducted on animals, not on people who actually use suppositories. Despite the distinct lack of clinical studies, anecdotal accounts from patients are often very positive. The overwhelming majority of patient reports have one thing in common: a lack of intoxication that’s typically caused by smoking or ingesting THC-rich cannabis.
                              The absence of a “head high” would seem to indicate that a suppository does not distribute a systemic dose of cannabis – which corroborates initial research findings about limited bioavailability. This suggests that a suppository acts more like a topical with a local effect, rather than a transdermal patch which disseminates medicine systemically through the bloodstream.
                              Why suppositories?

                              Rectal and vaginal suppositories have both been used to deliver medicine to patients for decades. The pelvic region houses a matrix of nerves that travel to the legs and up the spine, and the colon contains cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), which mediate many of THC’s effects.
                              Generally, cannabis suppositories are made by combining cannabis-infused oils in a carrier oil that hardens at low temperatures. Rectal administration of cannabis oil may activate the cannabinoid receptors located there, which could be beneficial for local conditions like hemorrhoids or acute inflammation [6]. The rectum also contains a number of key veins that deliver blood to the entire body, but it doesn’t appear that suppositories facilitate cannabinoid absorption into the bloodstream.
                              Even if they are only effective locally rather than systemically, suppositories may offer a viable alternative to patients suffering from conditions that render them unable to ingest their prescriptions orally [1]. Issues with palatability, severe nausea or vomiting, compromised esophageal or gastrointestinal tracts, and a range of other symptoms can make oral administration an impossibility for many patients.
                              Related story
                              What Is the Best Way to Take CBD?

                              Clinical research

                              A number of studies have called into question the rectal bioavailability of THC. In a 1985 study, researchers found no circulating levels of ?9 THC in blood plasma after rectal administration of THC. According to University of Mississippi pharmacologist and researcher Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, this means that in commercially available formulations THC is not absorbed into the bloodstream via the rectum at all.
                              ElSohly claims that any cerebral intoxication experienced using cannabis suppositories is a result of the placebo effect rather than the activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain – which is what makes us feel high from THC.
                              Interestingly, a later study showed that a chemically modified version of THC, called THC-hemisuccinate (or THC-HS for short), is bioavailable in the rectum. Succinate, an intermediate compound in the breakdown of sugar, is slightly water soluble, which allows it to be absorbed through the rectal mucosa. It was first synthesized at ElSohly Laboratories, Inc. Unlike regular THC, THC from the hemisuccinate ester was found to easily permeate and absorb into rectal mucus membranes [7], then enter into circulation as ?9 THC. As a result, most of the THC avoided first-pass metabolism and did not transform into its more psychotropically potent metabolite, 11-hydroxy-THC, in the liver [5].
                              “ElSohly claims that any cerebral intoxication experienced using cannabis suppositories is a result of the placebo effect.”
                              The results from a follow-up 1996 pilot study support the idea that THC-HS administered rectally could result in improvement in symptoms of spasticity, rigidity, and pain, while producing no measurable differences in cardiovascular function, concentration, and mood of the participants – in other words, without signs of measurable intoxication.
                              Most recently, in 2018, ElSohly and his team found that the concentration of ?9 THC in blood plasma after rectal administration of a THC-HS suppository was about 70-80% bioavailable, almost 2.5 times higher than an orally ingested THC capsule. While there were no reports of intoxication for the test subjects, the paper states that first-pass metabolism was “greatly reduced,” although not eliminated entirely. This means that some slight psychotropic effects from the 11-hydroxy-THC could still be possible with THC-HS formulation, but more studies are necessary to confirm this.
                              ElSohly’s research could have significant implications for cancer patients and others suffering from conditions that may require very high doses of cannabinoids but who are unable to smoke or ingest their medicine. THC-HS, however, is a patented molecule and can only be prepared with a license from the University of Mississippi.
                              Pain relief and pleasure

                              Cancer patients* and people with compromised upper alimentary tracts will likely have to wait some time before THC-HS formulations become commercially available. Meanwhile, THC and CBD-rich suppositories are currently being sold in state-licensed cannabis dispensaries.
                              Ben Odell, content director at Foria Wellness, a cannabis producer based in California and Colorado, says that the best way to conceptualize the effects of suppositories is by imagining them as powerful topicals – except they are applied internally. Just as externally applied topicals interact with cannabinoid receptors in the skin, rectal suppositories are aimed at nerve endings and cannabinoid receptors in colonic tissue.
                              “Everyone is debating and discussing rectal absorption of THC, and whether [cannabis oil extracts] and other formulations are absorbed into the bloodstream or not. But we’re not interested in getting people high,” says Odell. Instead their focus is on creating products that alleviate pain and discomfort in the lower body, as well as products that enhance intimate pleasure.
                              “Odell says that customers and Foria staff have been experimenting with cannabis suppositories for relief of other lower-body issues, like cramping, inflammation, and pelvic discomfort – with good results.”
                              Foria initially launched their mixed THC:CBD ratio rectal suppository as a sexual aid. “We were hearing from our friends in the queer community that a lot of people use nasty chemicals to relax the anal sphincter before sex — things like ‘poppers,” Odell told Project CBD. The idea behind the new product line is that THC and CBD could help mitigate painful localized inflammation and relax smooth muscle tissue – like the involuntary muscle tissue of the internal sphincter [9]. Odell says that customers and Foria staff have been experimenting with cannabis suppositories for relief of other lower-body issues, like cramping, inflammation, and pelvic discomfort – with good results.
                              Foria also produces a high-CBD suppository and a high-THC formula for vaginal application. Odell reports that feedback regarding THC-rich suppositories has been far more positive for pain relief than the CBD line. This summer Foria will be partnering with Harvard neuroscientist Dr. Staci Gruber to conduct a study that will track women’s responses to CBD suppositories.
                              Who can benefit?

                              Whether or not cannabinoids are absorbed into the bloodstream from the rectum, many suppository enthusiasts report powerful, localized, non-psychotropic effects for a range of middle and lower body afflictions.
                              Anal Suppositories

                              Men and women have reported using rectal suppositories to treat anal fissures, hemorrhoid inflammation, digestive issues, Crohn’s and IBS, sciatica, restless leg syndrome, lower back pain, prostate issues, and post-operative pain. Rectal suppositories are also being used for lubrication to mitigate pain during anal intercourse.
                              Vaginal Suppositories

                              Vaginal suppositories have been used to ease menstrual cramps, abdominal pain, endometriosis, pelvic discomfort, post-coital pain or inflammation, vaginal dryness and pain with intercourse, as well as for relaxation and sexual enhancement.
                              Of course, dosing via the vagina or rectum is not as simple as taking a puff or swallowing a pill (lest we forget about gravity). Cannabinoids are tricky molecules and there’s still much to learn scientifically and pragmatically about the efficacy of various delivery systems, including cannabis suppositories.
                              Thus far, clinical studies have shown no rectal bioavailability of unadulterated THC [2,7]. And while it’s plausible to speculate that cannabinoids could have an effect via local pathways in the colon and elsewhere, those pathways haven’t been studied yet. Although many anecdotal reports are positive, there are some significant discrepancies in observed efficacy [9]. Far more research is needed to better understand exactly how this method works (or doesn’t).
                              But there’s no need for patients to wait until all the results are in. If you’re curious, suppositories could be worth a try. You probably won’t get a “head high,” according to the legendary Tommy Chong, who uses cannabis suppositories under a doctor’s supervision. Though you might feel a little “butt high,” Chong says with a smile, which is not necessarily a bad thing.
                              Related story
                              CBD & Cannabis Dosing

                              How To Make Your Own Suppositories

                              If you want to try suppositories at home, you have a few options: you could find them at your local dispensary, order online, or make them yourself with a few simple ingredients.
                              What You Need

                              • Full-extract cannabis oil of your choice
                              • A base (organic cacao butter or coconut oil are recommended)
                              • Suppository molds (these can be metal, silicone, or plastic)

                              Instructions

                              • Gently heat the base in a pan.
                              • Add in the cannabis oil of your choice and mix well.
                              • Pour the mixture into the suppository mold and pop it into the freezer.

                              Tips and Tricks for Use

                              • While the onset of effects is highly variable, users typically report feeling effects within 30-60 minutes for vaginal application and 15-30 minutes with rectal administration.
                              • The base will melt quickly during contact with warm skin, so keep the suppositories in the freezer until you’re ready to medicate.
                              • You can prevent leakage by lying in a horizontal position during insertion and for at least 15-30 minutes after.
                              • Try using them at night your first few times. It’s always better to be familiar with potential effects before daytime use.
                              • Record your experiences in a journal to identify your patterns and best practices.

                              (Recipe courtesy of Paula-Noel Macfie)
                              * Suppositories are not reccomended for use by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. According to Dr. Bonni Goldstien, “chemo causes thinning and sloughing of cells of the lining of mucus membranes (which is the tissue of the mouth and rectum) and also decreases the ability of the immune system to fight infection” and inserting a suppository could introduce infection-causing bacteria.
                              Jelena Grove is a cannabis writer and budtender based in Portland, OR. This is her first article for Project CBD.
                              Copyright, Project CBD. May not be reprinted without permission.


                              References

                              1. Allen, Lloyd, “Suppositories as drug delivery systems.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain & Symptom Control, vol. 5, 1997, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/.../J088v05n02_03
                              2. Elsohly, Mahmoud A., et al. “Rectal Bioavailability of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol from Various Esters.” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 40, no. 3, 1991, pp. 497–502., doi:10.1016/0091-3057(91)90353-4.
                              3. ElSohly, Mahmoud, et al. “Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of ?9 THC Hemisuccinate in a suppository formulation as an alternative to capsules for the systemic delivery of ?9 THC.” Medical Cannabis and Cannabinoids, April. 2018, https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/489037.
                              4. ElSohly, Mahmoud ,et al, “The effect of orally and rectally administered delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity: a pilot study with 2 patients.” Int. Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 1996 Oct;34(10):446-52., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8897084
                              5. Gonçalves, Joana, et al. “Cannabis and Its Secondary Metabolites: Their Use as Therapeutic Drugs, Toxicological Aspects, and Analytical Determination.” Medicines (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 23 Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6473697/.
                              6. Maida, Vincent, and Jason Corban. “Topical Medical Cannabis: A New Treatment for Wound Pain—Three Cases of Pyoderma Gangrenosum.” Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 54, no. 5, 2017, pp. 732–736., doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.06.005.
                              7. Perlin, Elliott, et al. “Disposition and Bioavailability of Various Formulations of Tetrahydrocannabinol in the Rhesus Monkey.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 74, no. 2, 1985, pp. 171–174., doi:10.1002/jps.2600740213.
                              8. Purohit, Trusha, et al. “Advances in rectal drug delivery systems.” Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, 24 Jul 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/...nalCode=iphd20
                              9. Touitou, Elka, and Brian W Barry. “Anatomy and Physiology of the Rectum and Its Role in Drug Absorption.”
                              10. Walker, Larry A., et al. “?9-THC Hemisuccinate in Suppository Form as an Alternative to Oral and Smoked THC.” Marihuana and Medicine, 1999, pp. 123–135., doi:10.1007/978-1-59259-710-9_13.
                              11. Wright, Karen, et al. “Differential Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in the Human Colon: Cannabinoids Promote Epithelial Wound Healing.” Gastroenterology, vol. 129, no. 2, 2005, pp. 437–453., doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2005.05.026.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by trichrider View Post
                                after mulling over the inconsistency of oral dosing, i began to wonder why not bypass the liver like is done with sublingual and process that flower material into suppositories and get it as close to the problem area as possible.



                                have you given any consideration to that yet?



                                Do Cannabis Suppositories Work?

                                The low-down on what’s up with rectal and vaginal delivery.

                                By Jelena Grove on July 03, 2019 (Updated on January 14, 2020)



                                The back door is making a comeback - medically speaking.
                                Cannabis suppositories have grown in popularity, but how and to what extent they actually work remains a mystery. With contradictory claims from proponents and skeptics regarding the rectal bioavailability of THC, intoxication (or lack thereof), and alleviation of symptoms of difficult-to-treat diseases, it’s time to get a grip on what we really know about this method of administering cannabis.
                                Clinical research on cannabis suppositories is still limited. Much of the available data pertains to experiments conducted on animals, not on people who actually use suppositories. Despite the distinct lack of clinical studies, anecdotal accounts from patients are often very positive. The overwhelming majority of patient reports have one thing in common: a lack of intoxication that’s typically caused by smoking or ingesting THC-rich cannabis.
                                The absence of a “head high” would seem to indicate that a suppository does not distribute a systemic dose of cannabis – which corroborates initial research findings about limited bioavailability. This suggests that a suppository acts more like a topical with a local effect, rather than a transdermal patch which disseminates medicine systemically through the bloodstream.
                                Why suppositories?

                                Rectal and vaginal suppositories have both been used to deliver medicine to patients for decades. The pelvic region houses a matrix of nerves that travel to the legs and up the spine, and the colon contains cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), which mediate many of THC’s effects.
                                Generally, cannabis suppositories are made by combining cannabis-infused oils in a carrier oil that hardens at low temperatures. Rectal administration of cannabis oil may activate the cannabinoid receptors located there, which could be beneficial for local conditions like hemorrhoids or acute inflammation [6]. The rectum also contains a number of key veins that deliver blood to the entire body, but it doesn’t appear that suppositories facilitate cannabinoid absorption into the bloodstream.
                                Even if they are only effective locally rather than systemically, suppositories may offer a viable alternative to patients suffering from conditions that render them unable to ingest their prescriptions orally [1]. Issues with palatability, severe nausea or vomiting, compromised esophageal or gastrointestinal tracts, and a range of other symptoms can make oral administration an impossibility for many patients.
                                View ImageRelated story
                                What Is the Best Way to Take CBD?

                                Clinical research

                                A number of studies have called into question the rectal bioavailability of THC. In a 1985 study, researchers found no circulating levels of ?9 THC in blood plasma after rectal administration of THC. According to University of Mississippi pharmacologist and researcher Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, this means that in commercially available formulations THC is not absorbed into the bloodstream via the rectum at all.
                                ElSohly claims that any cerebral intoxication experienced using cannabis suppositories is a result of the placebo effect rather than the activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain – which is what makes us feel high from THC.
                                Interestingly, a later study showed that a chemically modified version of THC, called THC-hemisuccinate (or THC-HS for short), is bioavailable in the rectum. Succinate, an intermediate compound in the breakdown of sugar, is slightly water soluble, which allows it to be absorbed through the rectal mucosa. It was first synthesized at ElSohly Laboratories, Inc. Unlike regular THC, THC from the hemisuccinate ester was found to easily permeate and absorb into rectal mucus membranes [7], then enter into circulation as ?9 THC. As a result, most of the THC avoided first-pass metabolism and did not transform into its more psychotropically potent metabolite, 11-hydroxy-THC, in the liver [5].
                                “ElSohly claims that any cerebral intoxication experienced using cannabis suppositories is a result of the placebo effect.”
                                The results from a follow-up 1996 pilot study support the idea that THC-HS administered rectally could result in improvement in symptoms of spasticity, rigidity, and pain, while producing no measurable differences in cardiovascular function, concentration, and mood of the participants – in other words, without signs of measurable intoxication.
                                Most recently, in 2018, ElSohly and his team found that the concentration of ?9 THC in blood plasma after rectal administration of a THC-HS suppository was about 70-80% bioavailable, almost 2.5 times higher than an orally ingested THC capsule. While there were no reports of intoxication for the test subjects, the paper states that first-pass metabolism was “greatly reduced,” although not eliminated entirely. This means that some slight psychotropic effects from the 11-hydroxy-THC could still be possible with THC-HS formulation, but more studies are necessary to confirm this.
                                ElSohly’s research could have significant implications for cancer patients and others suffering from conditions that may require very high doses of cannabinoids but who are unable to smoke or ingest their medicine. THC-HS, however, is a patented molecule and can only be prepared with a license from the University of Mississippi.
                                Pain relief and pleasure

                                Cancer patients* and people with compromised upper alimentary tracts will likely have to wait some time before THC-HS formulations become commercially available. Meanwhile, THC and CBD-rich suppositories are currently being sold in state-licensed cannabis dispensaries.
                                Ben Odell, content director at Foria Wellness, a cannabis producer based in California and Colorado, says that the best way to conceptualize the effects of suppositories is by imagining them as powerful topicals – except they are applied internally. Just as externally applied topicals interact with cannabinoid receptors in the skin, rectal suppositories are aimed at nerve endings and cannabinoid receptors in colonic tissue.
                                “Everyone is debating and discussing rectal absorption of THC, and whether [cannabis oil extracts] and other formulations are absorbed into the bloodstream or not. But we’re not interested in getting people high,” says Odell. Instead their focus is on creating products that alleviate pain and discomfort in the lower body, as well as products that enhance intimate pleasure.
                                “Odell says that customers and Foria staff have been experimenting with cannabis suppositories for relief of other lower-body issues, like cramping, inflammation, and pelvic discomfort – with good results.”
                                Foria initially launched their mixed THC:CBD ratio rectal suppository as a sexual aid. “We were hearing from our friends in the queer community that a lot of people use nasty chemicals to relax the anal sphincter before sex — things like ‘poppers,” Odell told Project CBD. The idea behind the new product line is that THC and CBD could help mitigate painful localized inflammation and relax smooth muscle tissue – like the involuntary muscle tissue of the internal sphincter [9]. Odell says that customers and Foria staff have been experimenting with cannabis suppositories for relief of other lower-body issues, like cramping, inflammation, and pelvic discomfort – with good results.
                                Foria also produces a high-CBD suppository and a high-THC formula for vaginal application. Odell reports that feedback regarding THC-rich suppositories has been far more positive for pain relief than the CBD line. This summer Foria will be partnering with Harvard neuroscientist Dr. Staci Gruber to conduct a study that will track women’s responses to CBD suppositories.
                                Who can benefit?

                                Whether or not cannabinoids are absorbed into the bloodstream from the rectum, many suppository enthusiasts report powerful, localized, non-psychotropic effects for a range of middle and lower body afflictions.
                                Anal Suppositories

                                Men and women have reported using rectal suppositories to treat anal fissures, hemorrhoid inflammation, digestive issues, Crohn’s and IBS, sciatica, restless leg syndrome, lower back pain, prostate issues, and post-operative pain. Rectal suppositories are also being used for lubrication to mitigate pain during anal intercourse.
                                Vaginal Suppositories

                                Vaginal suppositories have been used to ease menstrual cramps, abdominal pain, endometriosis, pelvic discomfort, post-coital pain or inflammation, vaginal dryness and pain with intercourse, as well as for relaxation and sexual enhancement.
                                Of course, dosing via the vagina or rectum is not as simple as taking a puff or swallowing a pill (lest we forget about gravity). Cannabinoids are tricky molecules and there’s still much to learn scientifically and pragmatically about the efficacy of various delivery systems, including cannabis suppositories.
                                Thus far, clinical studies have shown no rectal bioavailability of unadulterated THC [2,7]. And while it’s plausible to speculate that cannabinoids could have an effect via local pathways in the colon and elsewhere, those pathways haven’t been studied yet. Although many anecdotal reports are positive, there are some significant discrepancies in observed efficacy [9]. Far more research is needed to better understand exactly how this method works (or doesn’t).
                                But there’s no need for patients to wait until all the results are in. If you’re curious, suppositories could be worth a try. You probably won’t get a “head high,” according to the legendary Tommy Chong, who uses cannabis suppositories under a doctor’s supervision. Though you might feel a little “butt high,” Chong says with a smile, which is not necessarily a bad thing.
                                View ImageRelated story
                                CBD & Cannabis Dosing

                                How To Make Your Own Suppositories

                                If you want to try suppositories at home, you have a few options: you could find them at your local dispensary, order online, or make them yourself with a few simple ingredients.
                                What You Need

                                • Full-extract cannabis oil of your choice
                                • A base (organic cacao butter or coconut oil are recommended)
                                • Suppository molds (these can be metal, silicone, or plastic)

                                Instructions

                                • Gently heat the base in a pan.
                                • Add in the cannabis oil of your choice and mix well.
                                • Pour the mixture into the suppository mold and pop it into the freezer.

                                Tips and Tricks for Use

                                • While the onset of effects is highly variable, users typically report feeling effects within 30-60 minutes for vaginal application and 15-30 minutes with rectal administration.
                                • The base will melt quickly during contact with warm skin, so keep the suppositories in the freezer until you’re ready to medicate.
                                • You can prevent leakage by lying in a horizontal position during insertion and for at least 15-30 minutes after.
                                • Try using them at night your first few times. It’s always better to be familiar with potential effects before daytime use.
                                • Record your experiences in a journal to identify your patterns and best practices.

                                (Recipe courtesy of Paula-Noel Macfie)
                                * Suppositories are not reccomended for use by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. According to Dr. Bonni Goldstien, “chemo causes thinning and sloughing of cells of the lining of mucus membranes (which is the tissue of the mouth and rectum) and also decreases the ability of the immune system to fight infection” and inserting a suppository could introduce infection-causing bacteria.
                                Jelena Grove is a cannabis writer and budtender based in Portland, OR. This is her first article for Project CBD.
                                Copyright, Project CBD. May not be reprinted without permission.


                                References

                                1. Allen, Lloyd, “Suppositories as drug delivery systems.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain & Symptom Control, vol. 5, 1997, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/.../J088v05n02_03
                                2. Elsohly, Mahmoud A., et al. “Rectal Bioavailability of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol from Various Esters.” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 40, no. 3, 1991, pp. 497–502., doi:10.1016/0091-3057(91)90353-4.
                                3. ElSohly, Mahmoud, et al. “Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of ?9 THC Hemisuccinate in a suppository formulation as an alternative to capsules for the systemic delivery of ?9 THC.” Medical Cannabis and Cannabinoids, April. 2018, https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/489037.
                                4. ElSohly, Mahmoud ,et al, “The effect of orally and rectally administered delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity: a pilot study with 2 patients.” Int. Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 1996 Oct;34(10):446-52., https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8897084
                                5. Gonçalves, Joana, et al. “Cannabis and Its Secondary Metabolites: Their Use as Therapeutic Drugs, Toxicological Aspects, and Analytical Determination.” Medicines (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 23 Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6473697/.
                                6. Maida, Vincent, and Jason Corban. “Topical Medical Cannabis: A New Treatment for Wound Pain—Three Cases of Pyoderma Gangrenosum.” Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 54, no. 5, 2017, pp. 732–736., doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.06.005.
                                7. Perlin, Elliott, et al. “Disposition and Bioavailability of Various Formulations of Tetrahydrocannabinol in the Rhesus Monkey.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 74, no. 2, 1985, pp. 171–174., doi:10.1002/jps.2600740213.
                                8. Purohit, Trusha, et al. “Advances in rectal drug delivery systems.” Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, 24 Jul 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/...nalCode=iphd20
                                9. Touitou, Elka, and Brian W Barry. “Anatomy and Physiology of the Rectum and Its Role in Drug Absorption.”
                                10. Walker, Larry A., et al. “?9-THC Hemisuccinate in Suppository Form as an Alternative to Oral and Smoked THC.” Marihuana and Medicine, 1999, pp. 123–135., doi:10.1007/978-1-59259-710-9_13.
                                11. Wright, Karen, et al. “Differential Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in the Human Colon: Cannabinoids Promote Epithelial Wound Healing.” Gastroenterology, vol. 129, no. 2, 2005, pp. 437–453., doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2005.05.026.
                                Thanks again, trich.

                                I'd done a bit of reading re. suppositories and efficacy, and Weez had been critical of some of the assumptions or assertions in support of suppositories.

                                But yeah, I have 2 lbs. of organic cacao butter chunks here, as well as virgin organic coconut oil, sunflower lecithin, 2 ml suppository molds, empty plastic syringes for administering oral meds to critters and kids, and more.

                                In short, when I began gathering materials, etc., for this close to 2 months ago, I didn't quite go all-in, but pretty close.

                                Yes, there appers to be strong assertion that the body makes use of 85% of cannabinoids when used as a suppository, and (some papers say) 35% of cannabinoids are util9zed orally (as opposed to the 6% referenced in your post the other day).

                                What's been clear in al of this is that there's a whole lot more to be learned about this, and 85 years of prohibition and gate-keeping re. research, mostly by the DEA, now presents itself as a noteworthy barrier to our finding out what we need to know.

                                As stated, we're still uncertain about the specific cannabinoids, combinations of, or synergy between that causes the benefits to cancer patients. And why only some?

                                Anyway, woke up a bit earlier than most days... By woke up, I mean I didn't roll back over and close my eyes again.

                                Had been contending with nausea in the A.M. and sometimes other periods of the day, but had typically just let it pass without any real consequence, suspecting some of the time that the supplements I take on an empty stomach might be a primary contributor to unrest in the belly. Several of them have histories of causing some to feel less than cheery; zinc, magnesium, prostate plus health complex (which, aside from cranberry extract, pumpkin, and other natural ingredients, to include saw palmetto, also has a bit of additional zinc).

                                Anyway, Yin & Yang were with me this A.M. The negative being that after returning to bed, having taken my pills on an empty gut, the nausea didn't pass, instead going full-circle, and the good news was, I hadn't eaten anything...

                                If you're going to be sick, there's some benefits to it being on an empty (or mostly empty) stomach. There's also some well-known down-sides.

                                Having had a lengthy conversation with my brother-in-law last night, whose spouse died of cancer of the brain, and having worked as a MH clinician, I'm more than a little aware of the pressures brought to bear on any significant relationship when life-changing events occur, whether death, disease, unemployment, loss of career, etc., etc.

                                So my less-than-romantically-appealing predicament this A.M. prompted me to converse with my wife about such pressures, and discuss the direction of any perceived 'push' from the stress that comes hand-in-hand with such situations.

                                All of that is good, but GODDAMN, at some point a person becomes tired of making lemonade from lemons, and wishes someone would leave a nice bowl of Rainier Cherries sitting on the porch or something..

                                Another day, hours becoming slightly more normal. I'm hoping that when all of the adjustments to the psychological reality, the dietary changes, and more settle in, that I can cause myself to get up, get my shop taken care of, and get stuff back on track, instead of the whole shitterree becoming subject to this ONE unfortunate moment in time. FUCK!!!!!

                                Anyway, on to bigger and better things. The -30 f. temps that were called for, let alone the -40 f. my friend in the bush spoke of, are no where to be seen. And it's rumored by NOAA that Tuesday we may see high temps of close to the upper +20's, then +20 on Wednesday and +15 on Thursday and +10 on Christmas Day, so it looks like if I'm on my game (which the jury's been out on lately), maybe I can get some extraction cooked off on Tuesday.... Maybe...

                                Sending out release of info waivers on Monday to 2 Seattle area clinics and a total of 4 urology surgeons (between the 2 clinics), hoping to hear back form the one, as they have several Docs listed in Seattle's top 20 urology Docs, and they are at some respectable clinics.

                                Now for some steamed cauliflower, steamed cabbage, and raw broccoli sprouts, followed by a handful of pistachio nuts.

                                "Livin' the Dream!!!"

                                No, but livin'

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