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Industrial Hemp in Oregon

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    Originally posted by thisisarolex View Post



    are you guys both outta line though ?
    In 50 years? Probably. Right now, no. You ventured into one of those semi-rare moments in life when one of the world's foremost authorities on cannabis breeding--that's Sam--is interacting with a younger, less experienced colleague (that's me, hopefully the thread can provide some context here) while we collectively try to figure out existing reality and plan for the future by understanding the past. If you have something to contribute or a contrary opinion, by all means, please feel free to do so--that's how we all get a little closer to truth.

    What has been published in academic literature, submitted to NCBI GenBank, shared to CoGe, and derived from sequence data on hundreds of thousands of samples by public and private labs is evident: no known fully functional CBDAS synthase variant significantly deviates from the CBDA:THCA ratio established in vitro (a study Sam alluded to). There are some nonfunctional CBDAS synthases that are capable of ultra low total THC levels, but the two known variants produce varying levels of CBGA as well. The point is: anyone who claims a "fully compliant" 20%+ CBDA variety is full of shit, end of story. The commercial hemp market is dominated by a very limited number of fully functional CBDAS allele variants, and for good reason (they are efficient vs. other synthases).

    There is a great opportunity of interest in feral hemp collection in the US midwest and we hope to help identify new variants. It will be moving forward, but I can't say too much yet--the universities responsible for curation are in the application process. I sincerely doubt that a more pure CBDA chemotype produces evolutionary advantages, but it only takes a lifetime of work to find a needle in the haystack that could change that. Or, alternatively, a simple bureaucratic change moving the legal threshold to 0.3% to 1% would make that all unnecessary. It'll give a few dozen grad students a project to work on for the next 10 years either way.

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      Originally posted by socioecologist View Post
      With the winter solstice quickly approaching, Nature reminds us that it's time to prepare for a new season of growth. What will 2021 hold? We've given up trying to predict this upside-down world and, instead, are focusing on what we can contribute to the collective shaping of a brighter future for all. The "Up Side of Down," if you will. Sometimes a simple shift in consciousness is all it takes.

      2021 will mark our 7th year in hemp operations and our 6th season of providing the industry's leading feminized seed to farmers. For 2021, all of our seed is certified both organic and non-GMO. Attaining these important benchmarks provides an even higher level of trust in our production processes and more value to farmers in the commodity chain. Factor in the industry's leading feminization rates, best total cannabinoid yields per acre, a bevy of prestigious awards for our genetics, and the revolutionary "seedless" triploid breeding advancements we are introducing, and we believe farmers' choice of seed suppliers has become more clear than ever before.

      Our whole team constantly strives to be more efficient, make even better varieties, and to give back wholeheartedly, especially in the face of catastrophe and challenges. The recent installation of 1.1 megawatts of solar generation capacity (2 acres of panels) at our main campus is our first step towards adding "net-zero" to the list of positive reasons to support Oregon CBD. More importantly, it provides a tangible manifestation of positive change and shows that hope is never lost--it emerges within those who choose to cultivate it.



      This thread is really very interesting, especially the important development work you are doing is very interesting .. I am an Italian hemp grower, is there the possibility to buy your seeds from Italy?

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        We are working to get export clearance for international sales now, hopefully we can by early summer 2021. In the mean time, if anyone is interested, I gave a short talk about our triploids and the development process for an Oregon State University grower's forum earlier this week.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpehlYztWzs

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          I have an area about 1/2 the size of a city lot.

          But there are loads of rodents & I don't want to use poison.

          You use poison on rodents, you kill all the skunks and possums.

          Either hemp growers have decided that's OK, or they found a way around it.

          One way is to line the bottom of the grow area with wire mesh ... that's a lot of wire mesh.

          OR, just grow them out to 3 feet in a protected place & transplant.

          I guess if they're big plants that could work.
          Never Under-estimate the Psychopathic-ness of a Politician

          who is in Save the Children Mode.

          Comment


            Vole pressure has been really bad in our area the past few years, so bad that no-till vineyards are going out of business. To say that it is catastrophic would not be an overstatement. We would never use poison, but have definitely used traps, .17HMR, and other lethal means, but the most consistent results have been from bringing in Barn owls. We put up a bunch of these boxes last summer and now have a resident army of predators that work while we all sleep.

            https://www.barnowlbox.com

            Originally posted by St. Phatty View Post
            I have an area about 1/2 the size of a city lot.

            But there are loads of rodents & I don't want to use poison.

            You use poison on rodents, you kill all the skunks and possums.

            Either hemp growers have decided that's OK, or they found a way around it.

            One way is to line the bottom of the grow area with wire mesh ... that's a lot of wire mesh.

            OR, just grow them out to 3 feet in a protected place & transplant.

            I guess if they're big plants that could work.

            Comment


              Originally posted by socioecologist View Post
              Vole pressure has been really bad in our area the past few years, so bad that no-till vineyards are going out of business. To say that it is catastrophic would not be an overstatement. We would never use poison, but have definitely used traps, .17HMR, and other lethal means, but the most consistent results have been from bringing in Barn owls. We put up a bunch of these boxes last summer and now have a resident army of predators that work while we all sleep.

              https://www.barnowlbox.com

              Definitely, if you can get animals to do the job.

              If only a herd of cats could be trained or confined to stay in a particular area.

              The spring type of mouse-traps seems like a good compromise. Just set up a few hundred of those. It's hard on the rodents but it doesn't kill the skunks or possums.


              I would like to find an animal that eats the TINY size of ant, the kind you get in kitchens etc.
              Never Under-estimate the Psychopathic-ness of a Politician

              who is in Save the Children Mode.

              Comment


                Ploidy fertility paper just went live:
                https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4425/12/6/923/htm

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                  It is an interesting read, I wish the best for you.
                  -SamS

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                    Seth, did you ever get permissions to export seed to the EU your export clearance for international sales?
                    -SamS

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