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    #76
    P.L. Light Systems - HSE

    Available with your choice of 18 reflectors depending on what your garden situation requires

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      #77
      I use the Alaska peat...seriously a nice offering for organic soil builders. It looks un-molested and smells 'active'...for me it's the good stuff.

      Comment


        #78
        Originally posted by Gascanastan View Post
        I use the Alaska peat...seriously a nice offering for organic soil builders. It looks un-molested and smells 'active'...for me it's the good stuff.
        That's part of where I was going - I just need to know the packing location on the Premier Peat product to be sure.

        CC

        Comment


          #79
          Originally posted by ClackamasCootz View Post
          P.L. Light Systems - HSE

          Available with your choice of 18 reflectors depending on what your garden situation requires

          View Image

          How cool does it run?...or how hot I should say.

          Can you touch the ballast compartment without burning skin?


          ......ooooooo member of Hortilux. not really riding the snake oil band wagon eh

          Comment


            #80
            Originally posted by ClackamasCootz View Post
            Scrapp

            If you have the package material from the Premier Peat still around I was hoping that you could tell me where it's packed. That information is required under Canadian and US laws.

            I think that Microbeman figured out something in a post he made on another thread where he tested Sunshine Mix and compared the results when he ran Premier Peat and maybe even when he did me a favor several months ago and tested the Alaska Peat.

            Thanks!

            CC

            Sorry the peat bag is long gone. I seem to remember it was from western Canada. The other main brand of peat in my area is lambert peat, and if it helps, it is from Quebec. Lambert makes a whole line with both amended and unamended. As far as I can tell they are very similar, with no obvious differences, at least none that I have noticed.....scrappy

            Comment


              #81
              Originally posted by ClackamasCootz View Post
              "Aloe vera" juice - a must have from my experience
              CC - can you break down the benefits and typical usage of Aloe Vera? I did some googling, read some vague claims about B vitamins and polysaccharides, but nothing in detail.
              >>>>>>>sig removed due to terms of use>>>>>>>>

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by Gascanastan View Post

                How cool does it run?...or how hot I should say.

                Can you touch the ballast compartment without burning skin?


                ......ooooooo member of Hortilux. not really riding the snake oil band wagon eh
                You can take the ballast and hold it as tightly against your body as possible and it isn't even uncomfortable, i.e. no heat issues at all.

                This was the first company to develop a true horticulture light about 36 years in conjunction with the engineering from Hortilux Schreder.

                I've got some units that are over 25 years old. About every 7 years or so you have to replace the ignitor or something like that. I bought a box of them way back when.

                "Industrial Strength"

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                  #83
                  GC & Scrappy

                  I'm waiting for an email from the production manager at Sun Gro down in Hubbard for clarification on how they process their Grade 1 Sphagnum peat moss at that facility.

                  CC

                  Comment


                    #84
                    Originally posted by ClackamasCootz View Post
                    GC & Scrappy

                    I'm waiting for an email from the production manager at Sun Gro down in Hubbard for clarification on how they process their Grade 1 Sphagnum peat moss at that facility.

                    CC

                    I'm going to get a coffee and breakfast burrito with homemade chorizo man.....

                    ..on the lighting system...perused the website...impressive. Equally impressive to hear it doesn't get that hot.

                    Comment


                      #85
                      Originally posted by IncredibowlBoss View Post
                      CC - can you break down the benefits and typical usage of Aloe Vera? I did some googling, read some vague claims about B vitamins and polysaccharides, but nothing in detail.
                      IncredibowlBoss

                      The information on polysaccharides is easily available but let me know.

                      Aloe vera is a nutrient accumulator like Alfalfa, Kelp, Comfrey, etc. meaning that you get the full panorama of Elements needed by a plant.

                      What separates any plant material from another are the Secondary Metabolites that they contain. IOW, if you only wanted Elements then it really wouldn't matter which of the accumulators you used. Sure - some plants will have a higher profile on this or that but across the board Alfalfa meal could be used in lieu of kelp meal were it not for their specific compounds.

                      Alfalfa = Triacontanol or Kelp meal = Alginic acid and the other plants will have their own specific compounds that they manufacture.

                      In the case of Aloe vera you have two compounds that are important - Saponins and Salicylic acid. You've probably seen references to using Willow shoots to extract a so-called rooting compound - well this is the same one that you can use without climbing trees or whatever.

                      Saponins are usually promoted as a surfactant or wetting agent which is true. But their role is far more complex as it relates to triggering a plant's innate defense systems - System Acquired Resistance (SAR) and Hormonal Acquired Resistance (HAR).

                      Saponins in the soil, per se, provide a number of other benefits that you can read about. The problem with trying to do research on the Aloe vera plant in the USA is that the links at Google are loaded with blogs, forum posts and manufacturer's blab sheets. Pretty daunting trying to dig through it.

                      You'll do much better at the Australian web sites. Australia is the 3rd largest producer of Aloe vera extracts - liquid, spray-dried and freeze dried versions. China & Mexico are bigger than Australia.

                      Besides these 2 specific compounds (of about 450), there are the enzymes and here you can go back to the Google sites, get the specific enzymes Aloe vera contains and then look over at Google Scholar, SCIRUS, JSTOR or another science-based search engines and figure out how it applies to Botany and soil biology.

                      But Saponins and Salicylic acid would the main selling points from a sales rep perspective.

                      HTH

                      CC

                      Comment


                        #86
                        Coot

                        Is the sunshine a Sungro product?

                        As you know I recently ran an updated test to reassure myself and Premier outdid Sunshine with ease. I got my buddy to have a look at the bags and there is nothing about where they were packaged nor harvested. It just has their HQ adresses Premier = Quebec and Sunshine = Alberta. Both produced in Canada of course. As I think you know I found out that Premier, Promoss line is harvested in northern Alberta and I believe you established that so is Alaska Peat. Hypothetically this puts them in similar geographic/topgraphic territory to so-called 'Alaskan Humus'

                        Other areas of harvest include mid-level Manitoba, Quebec, Ontario and the Maritime provinces.

                        Here is a site which 'sort of' tells you where each company is harvesting.

                        http://www.peatmoss.com/pm-membs.php

                        Based on the testing we fed most of the Sunshine to the worms and are using the Premier in our soil mixes. It is too bad because the Premier is around $9 per bag. Premier sales rep has recently cited me to back up their mycorrhizal product so I'm hoping to convince them to give me a deal.

                        BTW we include no lime at all in our mixes presently, just local crushed rock/sand and sometimes local clay powders (bentonite & pyrophylitte). I've been virtually unconcerned with pH for years now. When we did use dolomite it was for the mineral content rather than pH control. I'm of the mind that it is the ratios of calcium, magnesium and phosphorous which is what is important [as it is in human & animal nutrition]. I'm hoping that the provision of organic matter, composted matter and some ACT will be enough to provide the roots the environment necessary to derive nutrients.

                        I hope this is not too off track but can anyone give me the skinny on using diatomaceous earth (DE) in a soil mix. I can get it very cheaply by the ton. It is 67% DE and 33% montmorillonite [basically bentonite]. I wonder about the potential harm to beneficial organisms. Anybody?
                        ****************************** *******************
                        “If only ignorant and gullible people accepted far-fetched ideas, little else would be needed to explain the abundance of folly in modern society.” ~ Barry L. Beyerstein

                        "When the facts change, I change my mind.
                        What do you do, sir?"

                        ~John Maynard Keynes~

                        The thing which man is most sure of, is man's greatest mystery.....gravity. ~ tjw

                        Comment


                          #87
                          Originally posted by Microbeman View Post
                          Coot

                          Is the sunshine a Sungro product?

                          As you know I recently ran an updated test to reassure myself and Premier outdid Sunshine with ease. I got my buddy to have a look at the bags and there is nothing about where they were packaged nor harvested. It just has their HQ adresses Premier = Quebec and Sunshine = Alberta. Both produced in Canada of course. As I think you know I found out that Premier, Promoss line is harvested in northern Alberta and I believe you established that so is Alaska Peat. Hypothetically this puts them in similar geographic/topgraphic territory to so-called 'Alaskan Humus'

                          Other areas of harvest include mid-level Manitoba, Quebec, Ontario and the Maritime provinces.

                          Here is a site which 'sort of' tells you where each company is harvesting.

                          http://www.peatmoss.com/pm-membs.php

                          Based on the testing we fed most of the Sunshine to the worms and are using the Premier in our soil mixes. It is too bad because the Premier is around $9 per bag. Premier sales rep has recently cited me to back up their mycorrhizal product so I'm hoping to convince them to give me a deal.

                          BTW we include no lime at all in our mixes presently, just local crushed rock/sand and sometimes local clay powders (bentonite & pyrophylitte). I've been virtually unconcerned with pH for years now. When we did use dolomite it was for the mineral content rather than pH control. I'm of the mind that it is the ratios of calcium, magnesium and phosphorous which is what is important [as it is in human & animal nutrition]. I'm hoping that the provision of organic matter, composted matter and some ACT will be enough to provide the roots the environment necessary to derive nutrients.

                          I hope this is not too off track but can anyone give me the skinny on using diatomaceous earth (DE) in a soil mix. I can get it very cheaply by the ton. It is 67% DE and 33% montmorillonite [basically bentonite]. I wonder about the potential harm to beneficial organisms. Anybody?

                          I used powdered DE in my soil mix on one re-amend over a year ago...roughly 2lbs. .....no ill effects noted.

                          Comment


                            #88
                            In the case of Aloe vera you have two compounds that are important - Saponins and Salicylic acid. You've probably seen references to using Willow shoots to extract a so-called rooting compound - well this is the same one that you can use without climbing trees or whatever.

                            does that apply to everything in the willow family CC ? we have tons of the stuff growing everyplace there is water here. is the good stuff contained in the leaves or the woody parts of the plant? is willow a good candidate for an FPE?

                            Comment


                              #89
                              MM

                              Sun Gro Horticulture = Sunshine Mix(es), several straight Sphagnum peat products, Nature's which is a straight Sphagnum peat moss pack, Black Gold (retail product line) and another retail product called Nature's (horrible)

                              I should have some information for you to consider in a couple of hours - Sun Gro does NOT pack their premium Sphagnum peat moss in Oregon like their other products.

                              Premier Peat & Alaska Peat are packed in Canada and arrives here in 3.8 bales and 2.8 'pony bales' as Alaska Peat calls this pack size.

                              I don't want to misspeak about the actual mixing processes in Oregon on the Sunshine Mixes - but I believe that somewhere along the line the material is degraded. You'd have to see the size of the auger mixers that are used. 8 minutes is all that is required to mix an entire trailer full of bagged potting soil mixes - 8 minutes.

                              The actual mixing cycle is brutal - cone-shapped cylinders are on top of the mixing chamber and the CAM system drops this or that down as prescribed for a specific recipe. Covers are automatically dropped over the mixing chamber and then it's ramped up to full speed and material is flying around like crazy.

                              Straight Sphagnum peat moss is handled far differently. The material is off-loaded and placed in a separate mixing machine (much smaller) and it's only turned 3 or 4 times before the peat moss is pushed to the bagging/packaging machines.

                              I'm wondering if there isn't something happening in the speed mixing process - just an idea.

                              CC

                              Comment


                                #90
                                I've often posted in some places that I would believe that type of mixing makes for an inconsistent and somewhat questionable product.

                                How could that be considered mixed and ready for a three gallon pot?

                                How would any 'planting medium' be thoroughly mixed ripping through that fast and at that volume?

                                Besides the Alaskan peat I'm much better off gathering leaf litter and incorporating that into my soil mix.


                                Some kids might ask,"why do you put leaf 'litter' in your soil mix dude?"

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