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Cheap Nutrient Line for Commercial and Home Grows?

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  • f-e
    replied
    I have torched a few marshmallows and while I still eat them, I don't remember the burnt sugar tasting sweet. However give me a J and I will tell you what it was grown in. A few weeks into flower, mine always seem to get less selective. They will eat what they are given, but I generally burn them thinking it's a food demand. I'm just trying to get on top of it. It's just as they finish stacking. When you can't expect any more root system to grow really. It's done I'm thinking. Fit for environment. Let it in... It's just thoughts but there is no doubt most people can tell organic from expanded clay

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  • eyesdownchronic
    replied
    i mean, if you look at people using kelp to supply cytokinin via root drenches. the plant has to be able to take up and use the cytokinin in its complete form, which is a fairly large molecule.
    (just an example)

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  • eyesdownchronic
    replied
    Originally posted by f-e View Post
    Looks like cattle block. It's about 2% down on carbs vs table, and half of that is Potassium. So just 1% unaccounted for but we know it's Iron and Calcium plus some others that are quite field dependent. Presuming it's cattle block. The winter cow lollipop they often tie to a gate.


    A bit of reading shows its a common school science project to feed plants table sugar. A couple of teaspoons in a liter may do a lot of good or may harm a plant. This seems to work in soil-less grows where plants are not doing their best at making their own sugars. Which would indicate it's not only the microlife that like a bit of sugar. Though I have often read plants can't use it at the root, from higher learning sources.

    Really need to look at them science fair projects and their pics as evidence. I'm out the door though... Things to do

    It's actually a fairly contentious point in the Ag sector. whether plants are able to take up higher order compounds beyond single nutrient ions. usually we work under the assumption that they cannot, however from what i understand plants actually can take up larger compounds, to some extent.

    the real question ive always had, is whether plants are able to break down and resynthesize inputs they take up from the soil, or whether they simply going into tissue storage. from what i understand plants can't remetabolize, and it simply goes into storage, but the whole area is largely under researched.

    also worth asking whether plants can even take up and utilize C sources via the roots, or if they can only use C gathered via Photosynthesis.


    interesting with something like molasses that is generally considered much to large to be taken up via the root. but many people claim to have anecdotally better tasting weed when using molasses (or other Sugar form) . maybe the microbes break down molasses into smaller sugar subunits or organic acids of some form that the plant can take up and that in turn improves flavor? just thinking here.

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  • Lyfespan
    replied
    so far this Jacks RO 16oz, jacks calnit 4oz, and epsom 3.5 oz, per 100 gallons is really making girls in coco super happy, roots are exploding from containers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glaucksbacon
    replied
    Originally posted by BillFarthing View Post
    Rhizophagus intraradices found in Wallace WOW or Mykos. It's how you get the sparkly white root porn pictures.

    thanks bill, I appreciate your insight.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillFarthing
    replied
    Originally posted by Glaucksbacon View Post
    ok good deal, you happen to do any research on what beneficial product is you feel is best? Looking at great white right now, for some reason I thought they were an AN product for years, the art style must have thrown me off, so now that I know they're not associated with Mike, I'm considering them.
    Rhizophagus intraradices found in Wallace WOW or Mykos. It's how you get the sparkly white root porn pictures.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glaucksbacon
    replied
    Originally posted by BillFarthing View Post
    Not at all. Beneficials transport and make nutrients available in the root zone. Coco is a good source of trichoderma. Rhizophagus intraradices, azospirillum brasiliense and certain enzymes may benefit from sugar products, even if it isn't in my cup of tea.

    ok good deal, you happen to do any research on what beneficial product is you feel is best? Looking at great white right now, for some reason I thought they were an AN product for years, the art style must have thrown me off, so now that I know they're not associated with Mike, I'm considering them.

    Leave a comment:


  • f-e
    replied
    Originally posted by eyesdownchronic View Post
    i'm not really sure.
    i have not, but plan too.

    heres the link to the product
    https://customhydronutrients.com/mol...bag-p-829.html
    Looks like cattle block. It's about 2% down on carbs vs table, and half of that is Potassium. So just 1% unaccounted for but we know it's Iron and Calcium plus some others that are quite field dependent. Presuming it's cattle block. The winter cow lollipop they often tie to a gate.


    A bit of reading shows its a common school science project to feed plants table sugar. A couple of teaspoons in a liter may do a lot of good or may harm a plant. This seems to work in soil-less grows where plants are not doing their best at making their own sugars. Which would indicate it's not only the microlife that like a bit of sugar. Though I have often read plants can't use it at the root, from higher learning sources.

    Really need to look at them science fair projects and their pics as evidence. I'm out the door though... Things to do

    Leave a comment:


  • ButterflyEffect
    replied
    Originally posted by eyesdownchronic View Post
    hmm, i have not heard of this. will have to look it up.
    Let me know if you find anything. I'm still on the case, as well

    Leave a comment:


  • BillFarthing
    replied
    Originally posted by Glaucksbacon View Post
    so "livening up" the medium with beneficials is superfluous as well in this lineup in your opinion?

    Not at all. Beneficials transport and make nutrients available in the root zone. Coco is a good source of trichoderma. Rhizophagus intraradices, azospirillum brasiliense and certain enzymes may benefit from sugar products, even if it isn't in my cup of tea.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glaucksbacon
    replied
    Originally posted by BillFarthing View Post
    Sweeteners feed bacteria, not plants.

    so "livening up" the medium with beneficials is superfluous as well in this lineup in your opinion?

    Leave a comment:


  • eyesdownchronic
    replied
    Originally posted by f-e View Post
    Are you sure it's not? The moment you add molasses to table sugar, you have brown sugar.
    It's only the black strap that's got anything different in it. Especially if beet sourced. I just checked I have it straight, so can tell you it's zinc calcium and potassium primarily.

    I pondered if they had used white and added some nutrient salts. But powders would fall so caster would be better than granuals.

    Ultimately.. have you tried it in tea?

    i'm not really sure.
    i have not, but plan too.

    heres the link to the product
    https://customhydronutrients.com/mol...bag-p-829.html

    Leave a comment:


  • eyesdownchronic
    replied
    Originally posted by ButterflyEffect View Post
    From what I read, it has something to do with the Si promoting Ca uptake, maybe, I don't recall. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around all of this!

    hmm, i have not heard of this. will have to look it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • f-e
    replied
    Originally posted by eyesdownchronic View Post
    custom hydro nutes has a granular molasses product. its just like table sugar
    Are you sure it's not? The moment you add molasses to table sugar, you have brown sugar.
    It's only the black strap that's got anything different in it. Especially if beet sourced. I just checked I have it straight, so can tell you it's zinc calcium and potassium primarily.

    I pondered if they had used white and added some nutrient salts. But powders would fall so caster would be better than granuals.

    Ultimately.. have you tried it in tea?

    Leave a comment:


  • ButterflyEffect
    replied
    Originally posted by Hookah79 View Post
    How do we order AGT-50?.The site shows Mr.Fulvic when ordering retail?.
    Per BF, it's the same thing. AGT is marketed to commercial only and the Mr fulvic is for retail.

    Leave a comment:

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