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Mullumbimby Madness, Elephant Killer and more...

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    #16
    Originally posted by Dalaihempy
    hiya 420247 not posting to start drama but only to state facts you need to know as your going to work a line that isnt the real vertion.

    Mullumbimby Madness you have isnt the real deal but more an unknown aussie sativa that came from a guy called Mullumbimbyman i belive who lived in the erea.

    I belive it was removed by GN as people started to report hermies in the line Mman called MM and it was pulled from sale.

    like i sed not posting to couse drama only posting to give you some real info dont belive me pm GN and ask him why it was pulled from sale.
    Thank you for the info BTW The hermi part worries me though, and I cant use the PM's, will you pm him for me? please!!!

    Originally posted by hard rain
    I smoked several strains in the late 70s and 80s that were supposed to be Mullumbimby madness. They were all different. I don't believe there is any real strain called Mullumbimby madness, rather just a marketing ploy to help sell the weed.

    There is a reference to Elephant killer in John Birminghams book "Dopeland" but that is the first I've ever heard of it.

    Australia had some fantastic strains 20-30 years ago but everyone stopped growing as indoor indicas and seed bank strains became popular. Pity.
    To be honest I'm not real worried if it is or isnt the real "Mullumbimby Madness"

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/budzi...ies1034-0.html

    I want the strain/cultivar in these pictures that is being called "Mullumbimby Madness" for the large plant size and a large root system, in my lil breeding project I'm trying to promote drought tolerance, I think a deep root system will help.

    Originally posted by Dalaihempy
    hi hard rain the mm was real but few had the real variation i personally last saw it in mid 80s i had friends move up there and all they did was surf and grow.

    Australia still has lots of great genetics the tricks knowing the right people as a lot of younger growers are only doing commercial available lines from urope mostly now but the older growers are still working there old lines out doors.



    It grew wild in Queensland also.

    There are places on the Queensland coast, some of them within a few miles
    of Brisbane, where the long-leafed plant, Cannabis sativa, is to be seen
    growing freely and in the districts further north it literally flourishes in many
    places.
    Not far from Flying Fish Point, six miles from Innisfail, and situated at the
    mouth of the Johnstone River, is a patch of it which covers five or six acres.
    Farther along the coast, near Babinda, it is to be seen in plenty - also around
    Trinity Bay and near Port Douglas.
    Much farther south, around Montville, it grows with more or less freedom, its
    deadly qualities completely unsuspected by those who see it every day and
    know it by one or the other of the vernacular names it possesses. Its
    occurrence has been reported from Caloundra, lately become one of
    Brisbane’s most fashionable holiday resorts, and it grows in profusion in parts
    of Moreton and Stradbroke Islands.2


    Dr Cumpston wrote back on May 31 and was suitably unimpressed by this
    hysteria:

    With reference to the front page from Smith’s Weekly of the 23 April 1938
    containing a “warning from America” concerning a “New Drug that maddens
    victims” obtainable from Indian Hemp and that the “plant grows wild in
    Queensland”, I have to advise that the drug has been known for decades and
    the hemp plant has been under cultivation in Australia for over 50 years.
    Being a tropical plant - native of India and Western Asia - it has probably
    grown wild (now acclimatised) more extensively in Queensland than in the
    more temperate climates of New South Wales and Victoria . . . . When the
    plant is cultivated for fibre production, it is harvested quite early, before the
    pistillate flowers are fully developed, consequently little resin would be
    obtainable from a crop grown only for fibre.5


    Cannabis cigarettes, known variously as Joy’s Cigarettes or Cannadonna
    cigarettes, were also widely advertised in colonial Australia as a cure for asthma.


    Chapter 4
    The Hunter Valley Crop



    On the morning of November 16, 1964, startled residents of the city of Maitland,
    180 km north of Sydney, awoke to the news that the Indian hemp plant — which the
    newspapers called ‘the dreaded sex drug, marihuana’ — was growing wild along the
    banks of the Hunter River.
    A great mystery surrounded the find. The hemp plant is not believed to be a
    native of Australia, yet the sheer size of the Hunter Valley crop seemed to indicate
    otherwise. The plant was growing wild along a sixty-five kilometre stretch of the
    Hunter River, and not as isolated clumps here and there, but in huge infestations
    covering hundreds of hectares.
    All that day, the radio and TV were filled with stories about the wild hemp crop.
    The TV news showed workers with packs on their back, standing in huge paddocks
    of marijuana, spraying furiously. All this lurid publicity about the ‘dreaded sex drug’
    had a powerful effect on many of the young people of the area who immediately
    organised expeditions to go out and pick some of the wild herb.
    The time was ripe for the emergence of pot-smoking in Australia. It was 1964,
    and the Beatles had just toured the country; pop icon, Bob Dylan, who turned on the
    Beatles that year, would soon be singing “Everybody must get stoned!” For a whole
    generation waiting to turn-on, the only question was: How? For those seeking the
    answer, the Maitland Mercury revealed that “the plant did not need any special
    preparation. Flowering tops of the female plant or the leaves could be cut and dried
    and used immediately.”1
    Those who took the hint and toked claimed that — unlike US ditchweed —
    Hunter Valley weed was a good smoke. They were the first of many, a group of
    people who became known in Australian marijuana folklore as ‘the Weed Raiders’
    — the first pot smokers — legendary characters who came back from expeditions to
    the Hunter with their sleeping bags full to the top and wild tales of monster plants
    twelve feet high.
    Both police statistics and popular folklore confirm that the wave of marijuana
    smoking that was to engulf Australia in the next three decades had its origins here
    amongst the weed raiders of the Hunter.
    The Drug War against cannabis had its origins here too. The day after the story of
    the Hunter Valley crop broke, Inspector Blake of the Maitland Police warned
    “would-be marihuana hunters” that they would be charged with “possession of a narcotic”. As the Maitland Mercury reported: ‘Police fear that Maitland’s wild
    marihuana will fall into the hands of narcotic agents or teenagers “out for kicks”’.2
    Ultimately, the Customs Department would estimate that the hemp plants were
    growing along a 65 km stretch of the Hunter River, reaching from Singleton in the
    north to East Maitland. Amongst the area it inspected, Customs estimated that 200
    hectares of the Hunter Valley were heavily infested with cannabis, and the largest
    patch was over 40 hectares in size.
    The Mercury’s rival, the Newcastle Morning Herald, showed a farmer standing
    waist deep in a 5 hectare paddock of marijuana on his East Maitland property. It
    reported: ‘Since the presence of the marihuana was made public the Department of
    Agriculture office at Maitland has been receiving constant telephone calls from
    people who want to know how to produce the drug from the plant.’
    Like the Maitland Mercury, the Newcastle Morning Herald did not leave its
    readers guessing for long. Having shown a good identifying photo of the plant, its
    article next day informed readers that marijuana merely had to be dried before
    smoking.
    A grapevine of knowledge about good locations soon spread amongst the hip up
    and down the coast, and by 1966, quite a few Newcastle lads had their trail bikes
    revving along the back roads of the Hunter Valley, and were selling the herb along
    Hunter Street ; all along the east coast of Australia from Noosa Heads to Swanson
    Street, weed raiders spread this new joy.
    One old surfer remembers: ‘What happened then changed many people’s lives,
    and led to the hippie generation. The grass was the catalyst. Those in the know
    turned many people on, and they turned on others. It spread very fast.’
    For the local lads, the game of cops and weed raiders was a lot of fun. One
    recalls: ‘You could pick the weed at many riverside locations, but getting back to the
    highway with a sugar bag full of heads, and the cops on the prowl, could be pretty
    nervy. Some guys used to fill their hub caps with grass. Others went quietly on
    moonlit nights and took their time to pick pounds and pounds of the herb. From then
    on, all our lifestyles started to change.’3
    At that time there were many rumours amongst the surfers. One was that
    marijuana had been observed growing in the flower beds of the Maitland Police
    Station. Another had it that the farmers were being paid a bounty if they successfully
    dobbed in a weed raider.
    That this last rumour was true is confirmed both by the farmers themselves, and
    by published reports of the Department of Customs and Excise. The first busts of
    any size in Australia happened in the Hunter.
    An old farmer recalls: ‘Some of these young blokes were pretty blatant. They
    used to come up to me and ask, ‘Have you seen any of this marijuana round here?’ I
    used to direct them to a paddock filled with stinking roger (a kind of wild marigold
    that looks similar to marijuana). ‘There’s tons over there,’ I’d say. Some of the
    others were a bit more sneaky, and pretended they were only fishing. Sure we told
    the police if we saw them. We had young ones too, you know.’4


    Origins of the Hunter Valley Crop

    All the while, locals in the valley speculated about the mystery appearance of this
    crop that had begun to transform their lives. Where had it sprung from? How long
    had it been there?
    According to the NSW Department of Agriculture, this was the first reported case
    of marijuana growing in Australia! The plant was not indigenous to Australia, the
    Department declared, and usually had to be cultivated. Yet the sheer size of the
    infestation seemed proof enough that the infestation was natural and that no one was
    deliberately cultivating the plant.
    One theory was that the plants had grown from bird seed, which often contained
    marijuana. Old timers could recall buying hemp seed for two shillings a bag back in
    the 1920s. The Drug Squad discounted this, claiming that hemp seed in bird seed
    mixtures was generally sterilised.
    The most popular theory held that the plants originated from Chinese market
    gardeners. That the Chinese should be blamed is predictable; Australia’s first drug
    laws against opium smoking were fuelled by virulent anti-Chinese racism.
    However, all these theories are wrong. The Hunter Valley crop was first
    described by Dr Francis Campbell in his book A Treatise on the Culture of Flax and
    Hemp published in Sydney in 1846. Dr Campbell writes:

    I found it (hemp) growing wild in the greatest luxuriance on the sandy bank of
    the river Hunter, near Singleton. But whether it had been originally introduced
    into that part of New South Wales by some settler, or whether the plant be
    indigenous, I have not yet been able to ascertain.5
    Campbell obtained seed from this wild Australian hemp and conducted a growing
    experiment. He was impressed both by the prolific growth rates and the size of this
    wild crop. These impressions were repeated by the farmers of the 1960s who
    claimed the plants had one of the fastest growth rates they had ever encountered.
    Recent research suggests that the Hunter Valley crop originated with the Bell
    brothers — Archibald Bell and William Sims Bell — the first white settlers of
    Singleton in the Upper Hunter in 1823, who were friends of Dr Francis Campbell.
    Their father, Archibald Bell, believed that Australia should be a colony for the
    production of hemp and argued this case before the Bigge Royal Commission in 1819. Hemp was what the plant Cannabis sativa was called then; the word marijuana
    was unknown in Australia before 1938. In those days the view that Australia should
    be a hemp colony was widespread. Sir Joseph Banks, the ‘Father of Australia’, a
    self-confessed hemp zealot, organised the seeds for the First Fleet and he put
    Cannabis sativa at the top of the list. Hemp was at the heart of British naval power
    in the Age of Sail. Each first rate man-of-war in the British navy needed 60 tons of
    hemp for sails, uniforms, oakum and rope; and it took 320 acres (140 hectares) of
    Cannabis sativa to produce this amount. The growing of hemp was, as Dr Francis
    Campbell remarked, ‘a patriotic proposition’, and the British government
    encouraged the hemp industry with bounties, grants of land, and free seed in all its
    colonies.6
    The early governors of the colony in New South Wales, naval men themselves,
    ‘set the example’ by growing substantial quantities. In 1803, Governor King wrote
    glowingly to Sir Joseph Banks of the ten acres of Indian hemp he was growing in the
    new colony:
    From a pint of hemp-seed, sent from India in 1802, I have now sown 10 acres
    for Government. A specimen of the rope is round the box that Cayley sends
    you, which I have desired may be carefully preserved. It grows with the utmost
    luxuriance, and is generally from 6 to 10 feet in height.7
    Curiously, it seems that Governor King, who was interested in rope (Cannabis
    sativa) not dope (Cannabis indica) was inadvertently growing dope, Cannabis
    indica, or Indian hemp. At that time the British were ignorant of the botanical
    differences between the two cannabis species, which are very similar plants. Because
    Cannabis sativa seeds would not grow in India, Governor King was supplied with Indian hemp or Cannabis indica seeds. This would have produced poor quality rope,
    but might explain why the Hunter Valley crop was ‘a good smoke’.
    Whatever its species, the Hunter Valley crop was intimately linked with the
    founding of Australia, and this historical importance alone should have guaranteed
    its preservation. But marijuana prohibition had brought with it a kind of historical
    amnesia about the importance of cannabis.
    The day after the Hunter Valley crop was discovered, the NSW Department of
    Agriculture announced it would immediately begin a campaign of eradication:
    cannabis was classified as a noxious weed under the Local Government Act, and all
    hemp plants were to be destroyed.
    The Department confidently predicted that ‘the bulk of the infestation should be
    cleared in a fortnight.’ In fact, it was to take five years. During the late 1960s, many
    Sydney university students had their initiation into the world of the weed on summer
    holiday jobs at the Department of Agriculture, clearing, burning, poisoning —exterminating in fact — a breed of wild cannabis which had made its home in
    Australia for over 150 years.8


    Sorry long post but i think some may find it interesting.
    Dont be sorry, I'm glad you posted this, Thank you for the help and info
    Last edited by 420247; 03-08-2008, 14:13.
    I am the plant whisperer!

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    Comment


      #17
      Hey 420247!!!

      Nice project that you are startin there.Where exactly did you acquire those Oaxacan Seeds?I know you mentioned that they are from GN but at this time theres only a Laotian Sativa and a Thai Stick Sativa available from the GN Collection.
      You would do me a very very big favor if you tell me where i can get some of those seeds as im on the hunt for Oaxacan seeds since a long time.....i would appreciate it also very much if you tell me where i can get those "elephant killers".I hope you will be successfull with your breedings....good luck!!!

      Thank you very much in Advance...have a good one Goldenseed
      I dont drink Alcohol,it gives me a Headache.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Goldenseed
        Where exactly did you acquire those Oaxacan Seeds?I know you mentioned that they are from GN but at this time theres only a Laotian Sativa and a Thai Stick Sativa available from the GN Collection.
        You would do me a very very big favor if you tell me where i can get some of those seeds as im on the hunt for Oaxacan seeds since a long time.....i would appreciate it also very much if you tell me where i can get those "elephant killers".I hope you will be successfull with your breedings....good luck!!!

        Thank you very much in Advance...have a good one Goldenseed
        I got the Elephant Killer from the GN Collection back in '03 or '04

        The Oxacan Sativa were freebees GN was sending out

        I got all of these from the GN Collection back in '03 or '04

        Deep Chunk
        Pine Tar Kush
        Mullumbimby Madness
        Elephant Killer
        Zamal

        Take care

        If anybody would be so kind, can somebody PLEASE PM GN for me? He has alot of the info I'm looking for, PLEASE!!!!!!!

        Who came up with this 50 post thing? This sucks! :( for me anyway :(
        I am the plant whisperer!

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          #19
          I remember reading somewhere that the Oaxacan freebies aren't related to the Oaxacan landrace, rather it was a strain gypsy had obtained from a student in Oaxaca. I grew the Elephant killer and Aussie Bush. I have a picture of the Elephant Killer in veg somewhere around. I will try to dig it up. The Aussie Bush was a bit disappointing, but the Elephant Killer wasn't bad. Been a while, hard to remember the details.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Bluebeard
            I remember reading somewhere that the Oaxacan freebies aren't related to the Oaxacan landrace, rather it was a strain gypsy had obtained from a student in Oaxaca.
            YES!!! I do remember that I wish GN would post some info on these I know he has alot to share I like to work off of others experiences, kind of a base for me to start from.

            Originally posted by Bluebeard
            I grew the Elephant killer and Aussie Bush. I have a picture of the Elephant Killer in veg somewhere around. I will try to dig it up. The Aussie Bush was a bit disappointing, but the Elephant Killer wasn't bad. Been a while, hard to remember the details.
            Please tell me all you can remember about the Elephant killer, growing, smoking, likes and dislikes.

            I'm looking forword to seeing your pictures

            Thank you for posting
            I am the plant whisperer!

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              #21
              Bumpin for more info
              I am the plant whisperer!

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                #22
                Originally posted by 420247
                Bumpin for more info
                from "archives"

                A picture is worth a thousand words

                Comment


                  #23
                  I grew out one female of the Oxacan freebies. They need to be grow outdoors or with more than 400W of light IMO. Very average results from me.
                  "My buddy bought over his Sour D grown with his own "home made" fertilizer........Sure enough our souls touched and I have never been the same." - Motta-Tokka

                  Comment


                    #24
                    i have a bunch of those mullum seeds from gn aswell ,, i expect itll just be some aussie sativa .. many of them dont like it indoors and will hermie ,, they are not made for indoors ..
                    i havent grown any of the mm yet ,, got a good idea how it will turn out already , if its anything like the other sativas we grow here ,, and im sure it will be ...
                    as for the oaxacan ,, i have grown it several times , its nice sativa ,, matures pretty early and has quite a distinctive smell .. some buds can be quite solid ....

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Raco
                      from "archives"

                      Thank you so much raco I wish I was smart enough to print out the info I wanted to keep from OG, but for some reason I thought OG would have been around forever, oops! :( Its good to see you still around and just as helpful as always, thank you!

                      Originally posted by Bacchus
                      I grew out one female of the Oxacan freebies. They need to be grow outdoors or with more than 400W of light IMO. Very average results from me.
                      Did you grow them indoors or out? I think I remember you or somebody else growing them on there balcony?

                      What did you think of the root system? Was it fast growing, could it handle drought? Could the plants you had take some heat?

                      "Oaxacan freebies aren't related to the Oaxacan landrace, rather it was a strain gypsy had obtained from a student in Oaxaca"

                      The reason I ask, I don’t know what kind of climate the breeder acclimated this cultivar, indoors/greenhouse or right in the direct sun?

                      Originally posted by wallyduck
                      i have a bunch of those mullum seeds from gn aswell ,, i expect itll just be some aussie sativa .. many of them dont like it indoors and will hermie ,, they are not made for indoors ..
                      Good, thats what I want So they are more prone to hermi indoors than outdoors?

                      Originally posted by wallyduck
                      i havent grown any of the mm yet ,, got a good idea how it will turn out already , if its anything like the other sativas we grow here ,, and im sure it will be ...
                      Dont leave me like that wallyduck :( More info please!!! Finnish what you were saying I wanna know how do you think the MM will do in a drought situation? I live in So. Cal. and the climate here is very close to South Africa's climate, and similar to the foothills of Afghanistan, from what I've been told and read. Great land for fruit trees

                      Originally posted by wallyduck
                      as for the oaxacan ,, i have grown it several times , its nice sativa ,, matures pretty early and has quite a distinctive smell .. some buds can be quite solid ....
                      Same question for you. What did you think of the root system? was it fast growing, could it handle drought? could the plants you had take some heat?

                      Thank you all for posting all this info for me, I'm grateful
                      I am the plant whisperer!

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                        #26
                        yes they are more prone to hermie indoors than outdoors , theyd really prefer to grow outdoors ....
                        yep should go ok during drought ,, those sativas are pretty tough , however im not sure id expect them to florish during drought ,, just they will most likely survive it ...
                        as for the oaxacan im not sure on its drought tolerance ,, but they will take some heat for sure ....

                        Comment


                          #27
                          just another one
                          A picture is worth a thousand words

                          Comment


                            #28
                            I believe the seeds Mullummadman had/has are real enough if not the very item.

                            I grew up in Nth NSW, Brunswick heads, about 5 kilomters from mullumbimby. Although MM was grownn not in Mullum, more likely the channon, or main arm, that area. Mullumbimby "middle pub" was the dealing point of the whole district for many years. Places where an old holden worth a couple hundred bux would change hands for several thousands for the keys and what was in the boot.

                            I began growing in a more "serious" manner about 1987 (until then just foolin around), a couple hundred miles nth of Brisbane, with seeds my father kept from the very best stashes of what was presented as MM over the previous ten years.

                            Certainly any decent weed from the area could get the tag if you were a long way down the line buying it, but locals tended to be a little more savvy.

                            Anyway, I got frightened from groing outside in the early 90s by a large long winged bird with a man inside it, who subsequently allerted police. I thinks to myself indoor might be my way forward and promptly left the bush setting.

                            Hydro being the thing of the time, and no-one I knew game enough to set seeds out that grew larger than most might imagine, I rememeber throwing about 100 all of my last seed over into a concrete ditch which flowed into the ocean.

                            A few years later, I hooked up onto the internet and came across MullumMadman, who as noted was a decent young fella, giving away seeds of what he called Mullum Madness.
                            Unkown to me he had begun a deal with Gypsy (I believe) and when I was posting in a thread debating the authenticity of his strain, I noted he said it never produced a hermie.
                            I mentioned as far as I knew (as folk law always dictated when we bought it in the late 70s and early 80s), MM always threw a few very dark seeds here and there, somthing that was consistent, no matter how much it was watched. Buying seedless grass in the area wasn't consistent until around '85 I suppose from memory, so this certainly didnt upset anyone ever. The guys growing MM were definately onto their game but and produced high quality gear always.

                            With the deal going with Gypsy I was shouted down and condemned, and I pulled my head in and that was that. Apparently, true or not, the last thing anyone wanted to hear as they waited for this release (especially MMadman) was it might hermie, and was I ever bitch slapped or what.
                            Next thing I hear, the seed was being sold, and just as quickly being re-pulled as it produced hermies.

                            I wouldn't worry if your variety has hermies in it. I think it always did, and is perhaps a fairly low brow way of at least knowing it's not a "made up" johhny come lately. from Holland (no offense to dutch breeders).
                            Of course if it's covered in flowers you have troubles, but just a few? It's a bloody big plant, and afew flowers here and there, you'll soon tell if it's worth it or not. I'm as close to certain the seed I used in the 80s was genuine, and it always had just a few seeds in each plant to remind you who was boss kinda thing.

                            The guys who grew the orignial MM stopped early in the 80s, and vowed to never grow again I believe, (again local stories); all I can say about them is they must be holdng some of the most sought after seed in the world if they still sit on any today.

                            Just for the record, as in if it ever w as a real variety, while good weed could be tagged as MM at the time wrongly, no-one has dared to sell good weed as MM since the original guys packed up. Who knows what retailers selling 5 bux worth at the time might call it? But among the guys who lived there, who bought big ( I am not one of them) etc, it just stopped showing up. MullumMadman's story is he grew up in an area I believe behind Byron, and his father has lived there consistently since before he was born, and has grown what he considered thebest stash the area had offered in that time all those years. He got the strain from his dad, just as I did come to think of it, and with it's history it has to be good, and is most likely genuine in my books. But that is my opinion alone.

                            cheers
                            best of luck
                            RGS

                            Comment


                              #29
                              i missed meeting him at the last few mardi grass i visited .. i do recall seeing the pix of the plant he grew posted on overgrow that he called mullumbimby madness , a 7 lb beast from memory ... i also remember some of the guys where i live talk about their days down there in the earlier hippy days ,, they said mullumbimby madness was purple that they tried ... id guess given it was a later maturing sativa and where it was grown gets cold nights bfore they are quite finished would be quite possible it was coloured to suit ... ????

                              Comment


                                #30
                                anyway , gypsy had some stock of it that the mullumadman had sent him and i have a small swag of it ,, time hasnt permitted me to grow any yet , and i know its seed thats been around a while , but ill try a few when the time is right this year later and see what comes of it ....

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