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    Monkey Shit

    Hey there, thanks for stopping in! I am starting this thread to document a few plants that I have going right now, just to help me remember things down the road. Feel free to follow along if you'd like.

    As a disclaimer, although there are wild monkeys where I live, I am not using monkey feces in or on my plants. I can tell you that I have seen many monkeys that have and transmit human pathogens. I have personally caught Giardia from working with sick monkeys. Do not use primate shit in your garden!

    The thread title comes from the name some locals give to imported Jamaican brickweed. This is the cheapest, most abundant, and lowest quality herb you can buy on the street here. It's most likely what you'll encounter as a tourist, and it reminds me of the Mexican brick weed I would buy in the US way back when. Full of stem and seed, could be moldy, dried out, and just generally mistreated.

    Unfortunately, I didn't bring a seed stash with me. I spent a few months squirreling away the few precious seeds I could find in better quality herb. However, I kept thinking about the huge volume of seeds available in the "monkey shit". Finally a good deal came around, and I bought an oz just to turn into cookies, but what I was really after were some seeds. It was full of seeds, I think I pulled something like 300-400 seeds out of it. I sorted through and discarded any that looked immature or crushed.

    This was my first time growing in a humid, equatorial environment. I also had to adapt my soil mix to what I had available here. So the bricked beans seemed like a logical choice to work some kinks out. I'm still working out those kinks haha, but I am adapting. I have posted pictures of some of the plants that have come out of the seeds here on ICmag. It turned out to be a fun grab bag of who knows what genetics.

    One plant in particular I had taken a a few extra clones from. I may have even taken more clones from the first clones. Needless to say, I grew her out a few times. I called her the "Pink pistil" for obvious reasons. I even gave a few to a friend of mine that wanted to try growing for the first time. I'm happy to say he finished up with some nice herb, I posted a few of his pictures here on ICmag. This was the first time she had been grown indoors, and somewhat surprisingly his plants had completely white pistils.






    The only mutant to pop up, I documented here on ICmag. Honestly, it's kind of embarrassing to bring that thread up again. I thought the plant started growing with 2 pistils instead of true leaves. I even thought I saw female pre flowers, but when I flowered it... it was 100% male. It was trifoliate, and grew some impressive male flowers in my opinion. When I saw it I was a bit shocked, and panicked and chopped it down immediately. Within a day or 2 I had killed off any of his clones. I did have the forethought to spread some of the pollen on lower branches of a near by lady, which was a "pink pistil" clone. It turns out that was unnecessary, because the plant was full of seeds from top to bottom. He must have sprayed his whole wad on her, because I've collected over 500 seeds and still have almost a full jar left to smoke. Yet I've pulled maybe 1 or 2 seeds at most from the other plants that were growing nearby, most of them finished seedless.



    I left for 2 weeks over the Christmas holiday, so anything that was still indoor needed to go out. The week after I got back, the field I had been guerilla growing in burned to a crisp. It's a common occurrence that time of year, and I was expecting it... I had just been hoping for a few extra weeks. Luckily, I had cleared all the dry grass and weeds from around the plants, so they made it through with just some singed fan leaves. However, they now stood bare naked in the middle of a field, so they were all harvested quickly while the ground was still smoldering. I had planned on taking cuttings from the plants I wanted to keep when I got back, but Mother Nature stepped in. I had also passed along the rest of those seeds over my break.

    I stopped growing for a few months because I flower outside. We were in the dry season, which means absolutely no rain for 4-5 months. It is too hard to find a secure spot to grow a thirsty, lush, green plant when everything around you is brown, dead and dry. Finally in April, a friend of mine had agreed to let me grow a few plants on his property. So I popped some beans immediately, I chose to go with the cross just to see what came out.

    I soaked 5 seeds. 4/5 germinated, I vegged them under my normal setup for about a month. 3/4 showed preflowers as female, the male was culled. 99% of the growth was normal, with the odd leaf here and there that showed mutations like the father. Then I got news about an opportunity to move into a bigger house, in a more private location... with my own yard! So the plants never got moved to my friends, they just kept growing and growing while I waited to move. They were 21 inches (53 cm) tall when I had to move them to the new house 1 by 1 on the back of my motorcycle haha. They were a little bit beaten up by the wind, but no major breakage or loss. They quickly got stuffed into a new, larger cabinet I had prepared for them.



    They were in 1 gallon pots and getting pretty big by this point. I wanted to up pot them, but couldn't source coco coir from any of the normal places. Finally after 2 weeks I found some, but the plants had already out grown the new cabinet by this point. Some of the leaves got burned and crispy from being right against the LEDs. I mixed up soil that night, transplanted, and moved the plants outside. I didn't have time to let the soil sit, and I had never transplanted plants that were that tall. I didn't want them to start flowering yet, so I put a LED spot light on them at night. I gave them 2 weeks to settle into their pots, they took 3-4 days to recover from the transplant shock.
    A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

    Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

    Harvesting and Processing Neem

    Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

    Winogradsky Columns

    #2
    Here are the 3 ladies today, growing strong despite their neglect. Last night was the first night I left the supplemental light off at night, so they are officially on 12.5/11.5 as of today! All 3 have clones that are growing out now.

    #1. Skinny and lanky. What I consider sativa or now NLD expression. It's side branches are long and giving off that Christmas tree look.




    #2 The structure on this one reminds me of the mother. It has nice branching, but is more compact. Nice vigorous growth.


    Last edited by Hookahhead; 05-21-2019, 00:32.
    A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

    Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

    Harvesting and Processing Neem

    Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

    Winogradsky Columns

    Comment


      #3
      #3. This one is an oddball to me. The branching is a bit strange, the plant almost looks like a diamond shape to me. All of the clones that I cut from this one were smaller than the others. It has the fattest leaves of the 3.


      Last edited by Hookahhead; 05-21-2019, 00:34.
      A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

      Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

      Harvesting and Processing Neem

      Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

      Winogradsky Columns

      Comment


        #4


        Funny how locals name weed. lol. I love your stealthy transport.
        ---

        "All men's souls are immortal, but the souls of the righteous are immortal and divine."
        --Socrates

        Comment


          #5
          Love the pink/purple pistils on that Monkey Shit.

          And your disclaimer on not using monkey shit on your plant's is cool.

          Comment


            #6
            As a disclaimer, although there are wild monkeys where I live, I am not using monkey feces in or on my plants. I can tell you that I have seen many monkeys that have and transmit human pathogens. I have personally caught Giardia from working with sick monkeys. Do not use primate shit in your garden!
            But isn't all shit dangerous? Dogs can spread Giardia to humans as well. I knew a grower who composted his dogs' shit. You can get sick from playing in cow shit or chicken shit. In fact recently biologists have said cow manure, which I've been using frequently in my gardens, is what's responsible for the 'Beaver Feaver' Giardia outbreaks in humans. Giardia dies at temperatures above 130-140 degrees F. A hot compost pile averages 120-170 degrees F for long periods of time which would be plenty to kill the pathogens in monkey shit. I'm not going to link you to the human shit thread but big cities are breaking down human waste and selling it as fertilizer. I'm sure if you wore a mask, carefully collected the shit from apes and monkeys and composted it properly it would make great fertilizer.

            Another poster picked up some seeds in Mexico that were from a strain called Monkey Shit. Seems to be something completely different. Here's a link to the thread.

            https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=359308

            Perhaps these strains don't really cut loose, reach their full level, unless you use primate shit? I'm not suggestion you follow the wild monkeys through the forest, making faces at them until they throw their shit at you. It would be time consuming and expose you to feces diseases. You could eat lots of fruit and collect your own shit, probably not much different. Compost it and feed it to the plants. It would make for an interesting experiment.

            Comment


              #7
              Your plants need water they look way too dry.
              Terpene Amplification

              Comment


                #8
                @therevverend I am aware that any form of feces can be used as fertilizer. All organic waste products have some nutritional value, that's the beauty of nutrient recycling here on planet Earth. I am also aware that hot composting should make most products safe from pathogens. However, most home gardeners don't have enough material to hot compost properly.

                As far as pathogens are concerned Giardia was just an example, ALL mammals can be infected with and transmit Giardia. Strongyloides worms, Shigella and Salmonella species are also pretty common in monkey feces. This comes from first hand experience working with sick and injured monkeys for the past 2 years. The disclaimer was the because this is the internet, and sometimes you need to clearly explain things, for fear of a bunch of people derailing the thread commenting on the dangers or benefits of using monkey shit in your garden.

                @troutman Thanks for the advice. Yeah I see what you're seeing too, the droopy leaves. They're not underwatered though. We're just entering the rainy season, and they have been rained on everyday for the past week. I admit I'm not entirely sure what's up with them, they have been bouncing from perky to droopy throughout the day. Maybe they are overwatered, or the roots haven't grown into the mix enough to better regulate the wet/dry cycle. I am using a fast draining, lightly amended mix of coir and rice hulls as my base. I normally put them in the ground, but I wanted to keep these in pots so that I can move them around. This is my first time growing on this property, and I'm still learning how the sun moves.
                A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

                Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

                Harvesting and Processing Neem

                Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

                Winogradsky Columns

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Hookahhead View Post
                  @therevverend I am aware that any form of feces can be used as fertilizer. All organic waste products have some nutritional value, that's the beauty of nutrient recycling here on planet Earth. I am also aware that hot composting should make most products safe from pathogens. However, most home gardeners don't have enough material to hot compost properly.

                  In my experience rabbit droppings are the best form of truly natural manure fertilizer. They have the best nutrient content, are slow-release by nature, and tend not to burn plants. I use rabbit droppings to make nutrient teas and as a general fertilizer in my outdoor veggie garden.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ...
                    Knowledge is power.....Adapt or perish....

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by HydroGrowLeds View Post
                      In my experience rabbit droppings are the best form of truly natural manure fertilizer. They have the best nutrient content, are slow-release by nature, and tend not to burn plants. I use rabbit droppings to make nutrient teas and as a general fertilizer in my outdoor veggie garden.
                      Hum.... a local farmer here sells meat rabbits. I should stop by to see if he has a little manure pile.
                      ---

                      "All men's souls are immortal, but the souls of the righteous are immortal and divine."
                      --Socrates

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The disclaimer was the because this is the internet, and sometimes you need to clearly explain things, for fear of a bunch of people derailing the thread commenting on the dangers or benefits of using monkey shit in your garden.
                        And then I ended up derailing it anyway. But I figured you knew and were being a bit silly so I thought it'd be fun to play along. Wasn't trying to sabotage you, that's why I didn't link to the human feces thread. I was amazed how long that thread went on, everyone having to put in their input on it. And there is a real danger these days from stuff like Ebola because monkey immune systems and viruses are closer to ours.

                        On the topic of rabbits, besides the thought I could go for some hasenpfeffer right now, rabbit food makes good fertilizer. I've bought alfalfa meal and used it to fertilize my plants. Some clever grower figured out that alfalfa pellets for rabbits is basically the same thing but cheaper. I haven't used it but rabbit raisins have to be well broken down considering rabbits digest their food so thoroughly. Seems like it would be less hot then other fertilizers and ready to go without much composting.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I found some pictures of the plants. The first one is them stuffed into the tiny 2 sq ft space I was working with. The other shows the quick cabinet setup after the move.

                          They were 21 inches (53 cm) at the time of the move. They were 29.5 inches (75 cm)when I transplanted. Today was they are 38.5 (98) 37.4 (95), and 42.5 (108 cm).

                          #1 has a medicinally smelling stem run, it reminds me of Vicks vapor rub. I'll post your thoughts on the other two tomorrow.

                          @therevverend, no offense taken buddy. You can't derail anything that hasn't started yet. I was attempting a bit of humor, I don't think many people here have access to primate poop. Though it is important to stress that it's really not worth your health, there are many better options.

                          Rabbit droppings are definitely good stuff. I use goat/sheep manure because it's easier for me to obtain. It's a slow release fertilizer, as in it will last for more than one grow. You won't ever burn your plants with it, I like to mulch my guerrilla plants with it.

                          The internet says:
                          Rabbit Manure: 2.4/1.4/0.6
                          Sheep and Goat Manure (fresh): 0.55/0.6/0.3
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by Hookahhead; 05-22-2019, 02:19.
                          A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

                          Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

                          Harvesting and Processing Neem

                          Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

                          Winogradsky Columns

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Just a small update. Plants are starting to build bud sites now. We had 3 straight weeks of rain, and overcast skies. The sun finally started coming out again this past weekend. The plants didn't really stretch as much as I thought they might. I've observed over the past few weeks that the yard doesn't have a good spot that gets full sun. There are a good many security lights on the property, and any spot that gets decent sun is lit up at night. I have moved the plants onto the roof of the house, but they still don't get a ton of direct sunlight there.

                            #1 isn't doing so great. Many of the lower leaves have been burned to a crisp. Some leaves have just a single finger or two burned? I'm not entirely sure what's causing it to be honest. Any advice is welcomed. I don't really have high hopes of this plant finishing strong. Luckily the clones are growing nicely.

                            #1 - 118cm


                            #2 - 125cm

                            #3 - 136cm
                            Last edited by Hookahhead; 06-07-2019, 02:09.
                            A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

                            Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

                            Harvesting and Processing Neem

                            Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

                            Winogradsky Columns

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I switched the indoor clones to flower yesterday, they have been growing like crazy. I am running 114w mixed cool/warm white SILs. I am using plastic storage baskets that I found here. They have a solid bottom, but small holes around the sides. Each one holds around 20L of soil. I hope they work similar to smart pots... so far so good! There were roots poking out the bottom holes only 5 days after transplant from solo cups. Two plants are planted in each container, 2 of #1 on the left, and 2 of #3 on the right. The clones I have of #2 got fried pretty bad after their first feeding, but luckily they are recovering now.

                              Here's what the cabinet looked like 6 days ago (June 5)...

                              And when I flipped them yesterday (June 10)
                              A collection of Chunky’s Bagseeds

                              Hookahhead's Worm Farm!

                              Harvesting and Processing Neem

                              Monkey Shit (Jamaican bagseed)

                              Winogradsky Columns

                              Comment

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