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    Evil bastard mites.
    bug clear ultra for fruit and veg seems to work and is a systemic so should continue working for a week or two- I usually give a spray in veg, then another a week later just before flip.
    plus a good bleaching of the tent and surrounding areas between grows... I’ll often spray bleach and a different cleaning product (**produces dangerous gases ***) into the empty tent and leave it for a couple of hours to gas any life form to death, then run the fans for a while to clear the air before cleaning it out.
    "read the directions, even if you dont follow them.."

    https://www.jackherer.com/thebook/

    “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”
    - Ferris Bueller


    Originally posted by Harry Lime

    Put out the joint, step away from the computer and go for a walk.

    Comment


      After a little research

      Imidacloprid is specific for insect nervous tissue and doesn’t affect mites or mammals in the same manner.

      Comment


        Factors Affecting the Selectivity of Treatment Materials for Citrus Pest Management

        Treatment Material -----------------Pets targeted -------------------Resistance against pest-------Natural Enemies ---Natural Enemies affected --resistance
        Treatment Material
        abamectin (Agri-Mek, etc.) intermediate (citrus thrips,
        mites, leafminers)
        intermediate predatory mites & thrips intermediate no
        abamectin (Clinch Ant Bait) narrow (fire ants) intermediate other ants intermediate no
        acequinocyl (Kanemite) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites intermediate no
        acetamiprid (Assail) broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate no
        afidopyropen (Sefina Inscalis) narrow (aphids, psyllids) intermediate parasitic wasps short no
        Aphytis melinus narrow (armored scales) long, unless broad-spectrum pesticide used none none no
        azadirachtin (Neemix) narrow (whiteflies, aphids, leafminers, caterpillars) short few short no
        Bacillus thuringiensis narrow (caterpillars) short none none no
        beta-cyfluthrin (Baythroid) broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies low rates-intermediate
        high rates-long
        resistance in some San Joaquin Valley citrus thrips populations
        bifenazate (Acramite) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites intermediate no
        bifenthrin, trunk spray (Brigade) broad (insects and mites) long unknown (likely few) unknown no
        buprofezin (Centaur WDG) narrow (scales, whiteflies) intermediate predatory beetles intermediate no
        carbaryl, bait narrow (earwigs, grasshoppers, cutworms) intermediate none none no
        carbaryl (Sevin XLR Plus) broad (many insects) long most natural enemies long aggravates mites; resistance in some armored scale populations; resistance in some Euseius tularensis populations
        chlorantraniliprole (Altacor) narrow (psyllids, caterpillars) intermediate parasitic wasps intermediate no
        chlorpyrifos (Lorsban 15G) broad (many insects) lintermediate most natural enemies intermediate none for target pests
        Chromobacterium subterfugae (Grandevo) narrow (Asian citrus psyllid) short few short no
        copper bands narrow (brown garden snail only) long none none no
        copper sulfate narrow (snails) long, unless washed off few, if any none to short no
        cryolite (Prokil Cryolite) intermediate (foliage feeders such as worms, katydids, and Fuller rose beetle) long, unless washed off by rain few, if any none to short no
        Cryptolaemus montrouzieri narrow (mealybugs) intermediate, does not survive winters well none none no
        cyflumetofen (Nealta) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites short no
        cyfluthrin (Tombstone) broad (many insects and mites) intermediate most long resistance in some San Joaquin Valley citrus thrips populations
        cyantraniliprole, foliar (Exirel) narrow (aphids, leafminer, psyllids, sharpshooters, thrips) intermediate none none no
        cyantraniliprole, systemic (Verimark) narrow (citrus leafminer, Asian citrus psyllid, aphids) intermediate none none no
        cyantraniliprole/abamectin (Minecto Pro) intermediate (Asian citrus psyllids, bud mite, broad mite, citrus thrips, cotton aphid, twospotted spider mite, citrus leafminer and rust mite) intermediate predatory mites and thrips intermediate no
        diflubenzuron (Micromite) intermediate (katydids, peelminer, leafminer, grasshoppers) intermediate predatory beetles intermediate no
        dimethoate (Dimethoate) broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate resistance in some citrus thrips populations
        fenbutatin oxide (Vendex) narrow (mites) short predatory mites short no
        fenpropathrin (Danitol) broad (many insects and mites) intermediate most natural enemies long resistance in some San Joaquin Valley citrus thrips populations
        fenpyroximate (Fujimite) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites intermediate no
        flonicamid (Beleaf) narrow (aphids, psyllids) short predatory thrips short no
        flupyradifurone (Sivanto) narrow (soft scales, aphids, Asian citrus psyllid, sharpshooters) short parasitic wasps short no
        formetanate hydrochloride (Carzol) broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies long, unless washed off resistance in some citrus thrips populations
        hexythiazox (Onager) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites short to intermediate no
        hydrated lime narrow (leafhoppers) long interferes with searching ability of many natural enemies long no
        imidacloprid, foliar
        (Admire Pro)
        narrow (citricola scale, aphids, Asian citrus psyllid, glassy-winged sharpshooters, whiteflies) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate resistance in some glassy-winged sharpshooter populations
        imidacloprid, systemic (Admire Pro and generics) narrow (aphids, glassy-winged sharpshooters, Asian citrus psyllid, citrus leafminer, weevils, whiteflies) long predatory beetles and parasites intermediate resistance in some glassy-winged sharpshooter populations
        imidacloprid/beta-cyfluthrin (Leverage) broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies long resistance to the beta-cyfluthrin in some citrus thrips populations
        iron phosphate (Sluggo) narrow (snails) short beneficial snails short no
        malathion broad (many insects) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate no
        metaflumizone (Altrevin) narrow (ants) intermediate other ants intermediate no
        metaldehyde (Deadline) narrow (snails) short beneficial snails short no
        Metaphycus helvolus narrow (soft scales) long, unless broad-spectrum pesticides used none none no
        methomyl (Lannate) broad (many insects) short most natural enemies intermediate no
        methoxyfenozide (Intrepid) narrow (caterpillars) intermediate few short no
        micronized sulfur broad (mites, citrus thrips) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate no
        naled (Dibrom) broad (many insects) short most natural enemies intermediate no
        neem oil (Trilogy) broad (softbodied insects) short few short no
        oil (dilute application) broad (unprotected stages of insects and mites) short most natural enemies short no
        oil (low-volume) narrow (citrus red mite) short predatory mites short no
        phosmet (Imidan) broad (many insects, mites) intermediate most natural enemies short no
        pyrethrin (PyGanic) broad (insects) short most short no
        pyrethrins/piperonyl butoxide (Pyrenone Crop Spray, etc.) broad (many insects) short most natural enemies short no
        pyridaben (Nexter) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites intermediate no, but stimulates citrus thrips
        pyriproxyfen (Esteem) narrow (armored scale insects) long predatory beetles long no
        pyriproxyfen, bait (Esteem Ant Bait) narrow (fire ants) intermediate none none no
        rosemary oil/peppermint oil (Ecotrol) broad (unprotected stages of insects and mites) short most short no
        Rumina decollata narrow (brown garden snail) long, unless snail bait used none none no
        sabadilla (Veratran-D) narrow (citrus thrips) short predatory thrips short no
        smethoprene (Tango) narrow (sugar-feeding ants) as long as the bait station is filled none none no
        spinetoram (Delegate) narrow (thrips, katydids) intermediate predatory thrips intermediate resistance in some citrus thrips populations
        spinosad (Success, Entrust) narrow (thrips, orangeworms, katydids) intermediate predatory thrips intermediate resistance in some citrus thrips populations
        spirodiclofen (Envidor) narrow (mites) intermediate predatory mites intermediate no
        spirotetramat (Movento) broad (mites, thrips, leafminer, aphids, armored scales) long predatory mites short no
        sodium ferric edta (Ferroxx) narrow (snails) short predatory snails short no
        sticky materials narrow (trunk climbers) long few, if any long no
        thiamethoxam, foliar (Actara) broad (many insects) long most long no
        thiamethoxam, systemic (Platinum) narrow (sucking insects) long predatory beetles and parasitic wasps intermediate no
        thiamethoxam/abamectin (Agri-flex) broad (many insects) long most long no
        thiamethoxam/chlorantraniliprole (Voliam flexi) broad (many insects) long most long no
        vedalia beetle narrow (cottony cushion scale) long none none no
        wettable sulfur narrow (mites and citrus thrips) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate no
        zeta-cypermethrin broad (many insects and mites) intermediate most natural enemies intermediate no

        Comment


          With nothing to loose I tripled the dosage of the 7.9% Bifenthrin.. I dipped every clone for 30 seconds . I then did a complete soil drench with the same mixture. I will dip them again, if they survive, a second time in 4-5 days.

          Comment


            Several of those little "buggers" to chose from. 1 week lead time.

            https://www.arbico-organics.com/category/mite-predators

            I just received some nematodes from them. Little red baby eating mites, die!
            ______________________________ __________________________
            Dr. Tuggle's Compound Syrup of Globe Flower

            https://youtu.be/x0BinEFCp38?t=74

            https://youtu.be/NUmIO_MG5IU?t=87

            Things just chug long when those microbes are happy........scrappy

            Comment


              flylow
              Thanks for the link. I really lean more to a natural way of controlling things. I need to do more research.

              Any reason nematodes is the predator you picked vs the other choices?

              Comment


                Originally posted by mr.brunch View Post
                Evil bastard mites.
                bug clear ultra for fruit and veg seems to work and is a systemic so should continue working for a week or two- I usually give a spray in veg, then another a week later just before flip.
                plus a good bleaching of the tent and surrounding areas between grows... I’ll often spray bleach and a different cleaning product (**produces dangerous gases ***) into the empty tent and leave it for a couple of hours to gas any life form to death, then run the fans for a while to clear the air before cleaning it out.
                Thanks Mr Brunch.

                I will look up bug clear ultra. I am at my wits end but thats a short road anyways.

                Comment


                  Mr. Hamstring, I asked Chris at Redbud Soil to have me supplied in advance in case I got bugs. Nematodes were one weapon, and a bottle of"PureCrop1" was the other. The nematodes for the soil came in granules which I sprinkled on the top of the soil. I had sprouts in my 2nd run (see diary) that were being killed by little red mites. The nematodes seem to have slowed them down.

                  The IPM stuff showed up and I had no idea what they were or what to do. They sat in the fridge a few weeks, but still seemed to work. I have a sprayer now that is just for the PureCrop1 leaf spray.

                  Just in case, I want to add some nematodes to the soil I have waiting for the 2nd run, so I ordered some nematodes from that supplier I linked, and they showed up today (2 different kinds):

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	DSC00330.JPG Views:	0 Size:	85.1 KB ID:	17816442

                  Check this out:

                  https://www.arbico-organics.com/cate...bis-crop-guide
                  ______________________________ __________________________
                  Dr. Tuggle's Compound Syrup of Globe Flower

                  https://youtu.be/x0BinEFCp38?t=74

                  https://youtu.be/NUmIO_MG5IU?t=87

                  Things just chug long when those microbes are happy........scrappy

                  Comment


                    All Miticides Are Not Created Equal

                    September 15, 2004When it comes to selecting a miticide to control spider mites or �mites� in landscapes and nurseries, there is sometimes confusion that all miticides are similar in terms of their use and the range of mites that they control. However, miticides are not all created equal because they may vary in where they can be used and the target mites on the label. Following are detailed descriptions of five miticides that are generally recommended for controlling mites both indoors and/or outdoors. This is the conclusion of a two-part article, with the first part published in issue no. 15 of this newsletter (August 18, 2004).
                    Avid, which contains abamectin as the active ingredient, is an effective insecticide/miticide for many different mite species and is typically recommended for control of mites both indoors and outdoors. The active ingredient, which occurs naturally, is derived from the soil microorganism, Streptomyces avermitilis. Avid is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, European red mite, carmine spider mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, cyclamen mite, broad mite, and rust and bud mite. The product can be used to control mites in greenhouses, shadehouses, on field-grown ornamentals, Christmas tree plantations, and woody ornamentals. Avid is a contact and translaminar miticide. Translaminar is a term that refers to insecticides/miticides that penetrate the leaf tissue and form a reservoir of active ingredient within the leaf. Avid generally provides up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate for all mite species is 4 fl oz per 100 gal. Avid is active on the mobile life stages of mites, with no activity on eggs. Although the insecticide/miticide is slow acting, treated mites are immobilized after exposure.
                    Floramite, which contains the active ingredient bifenazate is labeled for control of a wide range of mites, including twospotted spider mite, Pacific mite, strawberry mite, European red mite, citrus red mite, clover mite, southern red mite, spruce spider mite, and bamboo spider mite. It is not active on rust, broad, or flat mite. Floramite is labeled for use in greenhouses, shadehouses, nurseries, Christmas tree plantations, landscapes, and interiorscapes. This is a contact miticide, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is essential. This miticide is active on all mite life stages, including eggs. Floramite is fast acting and provides up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate is 4 to 8 fl oz per 100 gal.
                    TetraSan contains the active ingredient etoxazole and is actually a growth regulator for mites, inhibiting the molting process. TetraSan is labeled for control of the following mites: twospotted spider mite, citrus red mite, European red mite, lewis spider mite, Pacific spider mite, Southern red mite, and spruce spider mite. TetraSan can be used to control mites in greenhouses, lathhouses, shadehouses, and interiorscapes and on outdoor ornamentals. Similar to abamectin (Avid) (described previously), TetraSan is a contact and translaminar miticide providing up to 28 days of residual activity from a single application. The label rate for controlling mites is 8 to 16 oz per 100 gal. The product is active on the egg, larvae, and nymphal stages. It has minimal effect on adult mites. However, adult female mites that are treated do not produce viable eggs.
                    Pylon is a miticide that is can be used only in greenhouses. It contains the active ingredient chlorfenapyr. Pylon is labeled for control of various mites, including twospotted spider mite, broad mite, cyclamen mite, citrus bud mite, and rust mite. Pylon is a contact and translaminar miticide. In addition, it works as a stomach poison when ingested. Pylon is only active on the mobile life stages, including larvae, nymphs, and adults. It has no activity on mite eggs. The product can provide up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate is 2.6 to 5.2 fl oz per 100 gal.
                    Vendex is one of the older miticides and contains the active ingredient fenbutatin-oxide. The miticide is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, clover mite, Southern red mite, and spruce spider mite. Vendex can be used in greenhouses, on outdoor ornamentals, and on established landscape ornamentals and nurseries. This is a contact miticide, so it is important to thoroughly spray all plant parts during application. Vendex is slower acting than most miticides, taking 7 to 10 days to eventually kill mites. However, it provides long-lasting control--about 30 days of residual activity. The label rate is 8 to 16 oz per 100 gal. Vendex is a warm-weather miticide providing better control when the ambient air temperature is above 70 degrees F. This product is a restricted-use pesticide.
                    For more information on the products mentioned, be sure to consult the label or the manufacturer.

                    Author:Raymond A. Cloyd

                    Comment


                      Avid? Really?

                      Southern Red Mite? Hmmmm, Maybe what I had. May be in my soil tub down in the shed.

                      ______________________________ __________________________
                      Dr. Tuggle's Compound Syrup of Globe Flower

                      https://youtu.be/x0BinEFCp38?t=74

                      https://youtu.be/NUmIO_MG5IU?t=87

                      Things just chug long when those microbes are happy........scrappy

                      Comment


                        Sorry to hear.
                        i think switching the active ingredient is essential with mite problems that come back. After the first dip change to different stuff for the 2. and never the same 2 in a row. Some kill everything but u might miss one or 2 or they survive the attack, some work only on growing mites and didn't harm the eggs.

                        Can u get the described miticides? I have not tried them on my own but get some avid, floramite and tetrasan and use them alternating because the 3 act different. So every third day a different product.

                        On page 55 sshz mentioned 3 products used by a big grower. Try them as they work proven. On the same page crocked8 mentioned some foggers that work. I think the advantage of them is that they will cover everything and crawl in every corner so its more likely to catch 100% of the fuckers.

                        In addition get some chrysoperla and neoseiulus californicus as predator. The californicus need min 60% rh to work good. The chrysoperla only need min 15°c to work

                        They came back several times so now its war. I wouldn't worry to much about killing/harming clones because u have to kill them anyway when u can't get rid of the mites.

                        Comment


                          chilliwilli

                          Hey man thanks and thats just what I came back for was go through this thread. I will tell you after dipping and doing a soil drench with tripled the dosage of the 7.9% Bifenthrin I decided to take a look again today. I picked/pinched off any leaf that had the curling tip. I' say it was 10 leaves ( On just one strain) and sure enough there was a live mite. There would be no way to do this type of analysis with out the USB scope.

                          It becomes a financial analysis at some point. Avid is $100 and I can probably get my Cocoa OG clone for cheaper than that. Just want to make sure I document my thoughts for some other poor sap who gets mites.

                          Step one buy a USB scope($40.00). Anyone that tells you that you can call your plant mite free without a scope is misleading you.

                          I plan to stay on the path of trying to rid my current clones of the mites for a little while longer. This is a learning curve and pain is one of the quickest ways to learn. The "hot stove" methodology. There has to be a point where the cost and time of trying to rid them is not worth the money and effort of just getting a new clone. Some of them are not replaceable and that really sucks.

                          Back to work headed to pg 55-- I will try and keep this thread moving forward with my efforts.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by sshz View Post
                            Actually, Avid and Maverick are quite similar. BUT, Avid has a residual effect up to 28 days which can be helpful in fighting off the critters. Both though, are not supposed to be used on marijuana plants.
                            First off not busting anyones nuts just adding to the conversation which I totally respect and appreciate the advice.

                            Maveriks active ingredient and Fluvalinate which is a synthetic pyrethroid chemical compound . So it would be the same as what i am currently using which is Bifenthrin which is an insecticide in the pyrethroid family.

                            Avid contains abamectin as its active ingredient and is in the glycoside class of chemistry listed in the MOA Group 6. If you goggle abamectin you can purchase it around 30% cheaper than Avid.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by sshz View Post
                              Hot Shots are carcinogenic.......anyone that recommends them doesn't care about their health. A master grower in Denver, CO who operates many of the largest grows in the state recommends rotating these 3 products for mites, spraying and drenching:

                              1. Pyganic
                              2. Botaniguard Max
                              3. Venerate
                              1. Pyganic-active ingredient is pyrethroid




                              2. Botaniguard-- Max-BotaniGard MAXX is a unique combination product containing natural Pyrethrins and Beauveria bassiana . Beauveria bassiana strain GHA is a fungus that is used as a pesticide for controlling many kinds of insects.



                              To a laymen Venerate sounds all lot like diatomaceous earth.
                              3. Venerate---Venerate is an advanced bio-insecticide that features multiple modes of action and is effective against a wide variety of pests while being easy on beneficials. Venerate controls or suppresses many foliar feeding pests including caterpillars and foliage feeding coleopteran and is effective against many soft-bodied insects such as, aphids, whiteflies and plant sucking mites. Venerate combats insect targets by enzymatic degradation of exoskeletal structures and interference with the molting process leading to mortality through contact and/or ingestion. Venerate’s unique modes of action complement and improve integrated pest management and insect resistance management programs.

                              Active Ingredient:

                              Heat-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media*.... 94.46%

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Crooked8 View Post

                                This is just purely false. Firstly, many products effectively kill spidermites. And second, if someone had an infestation, cleaned and vacuumed the room and just got new clones, they likely will see the same problem right away again due to the size and resilience of them. I cannot believe the suggestions on here. Hot shot strips? Nothing kills them? Jesus Christ.

                                If you really want them GONE, there are three foggers that will handle it. Lights off, oscillating fans on, no exhaust or scrubbers running. Let each one run in the room a minimum of 6-8 hours before exhausting. First, bethoveen, wait three days, pylon, wait three days, pyrethrum. I emptied my room and ran those and havent seen a spider mite in 3 years. Not one. The labels say they are safe up until harvest but thats up to ones own morals. I just took all my shit down other than veg and ran the bombs before refilling. Clean and clear since. If you really want to be certain run the foggers between runs as well. You should never see them again. Anyone suggesting contact sprays may see a product working and killing them but to effectively and fully eradicate them you need to get every surface of everything. Spraying even with an atomizer wont cut it. At least not in my experience. Everyones room is different and every climate has an impact but I’ve never seen the three bombs not work.
                                beethoven active ingredient ----Etoxazole is a narrow spectrum systemic acaricide used to combat spider mites. It targets a variety of mites in the egg, larvae and nymph stages however not the adult stage.

                                Pylon active ingredient---- Chlorfenapyr is a pesticide, and specifically a pro-insecticide (meaning it is metabolized into an active insecticide after entering the host), derived from a class of microbially produced compounds known as halogenated pyrroles.

                                Comment

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