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WARNING NGW hose is OFFGASSING!!!

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    #31
    not sure why it should be unstickied, it's a problem that can crop up in rare cases. in my case a few years back i sourced the issue to the floor. once i sealed the grow area off and added active intake to stop any air getting sucked in from that room, the issue went away.

    basically if it happens to you it's good to have information available.




    "it is clear that the individual who persecutes a man, his brother, because he is not of his opinion.....is a monster" Voltaire

    not every post you disagree with, has to be responded to!

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      #32
      Originally posted by gaiusmarius View Post
      not sure why it should be unstickied, it's a problem that can crop up in rare cases. in my case a few years back i sourced the issue to the floor. once i sealed the grow area off and added active intake to stop any air getting sucked in from that room, the issue went away.

      basically if it happens to you it's good to have information available.
      Their's a million problems "that can crop up in rare cases". What exactly does this one have to do with nutrients?

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        #33
        ahh....

        didn't even check the sub it's in. i guess ill move it to a more appropriate sub.

        in the end it's the rare problems that will stump ya, any idiot can look up how to get rid of mites, the web is full of this info. it's the rare problems that tend to be hard to solve, so i see no harm having such a thread stickied for those rare cases.




        "it is clear that the individual who persecutes a man, his brother, because he is not of his opinion.....is a monster" Voltaire

        not every post you disagree with, has to be responded to!

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by gaiusmarius View Post
          ahh....

          didn't even check the sub it's in. i guess ill move it to a more appropriate sub.

          in the end it's the rare problems that will stump ya, any idiot can look up how to get rid of mites, the web is full of this info. it's the rare problems that tend to be hard to solve, so i see no harm having such a thread stickied for those rare cases.
          Sounds fair. No one is coming to this section to get rid of mites and for sure not for off gassing hoses.

          Edit: Just seen you changed it. Thx bro, you're a good mod.

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            #35
            As a rule I use only food grade stuff tubes fittings etc

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              #36
              How do I identify phthalates in products?

              There is no easy way to tell if a product has added phthalates.

              Phthalates can be identified on labels by a three or four letter acronym that defines their chemical structures. Labels rarely state “contains phthalates”.

              There are a multitude of phthalate compounds.

              Which phthalate compound is added to a product depends in part on their molecular weight (MW).

              Phthalates with a higher molecular weight (HMW) are very slightly soluble in water;
              phthalates with a lower molecular weight (LMW) are reasonably soluble in water.

              The 8 most widely used phthalate compounds and their metabolites are:
              • BBP: butyl benzyl phthalate (LMW) *, **, ***
              MBzP: mono benzyl phthalate
              • DBP: di-n-butyl phthalate (LMW) *, **, ***
              MBP: mono-n-butyl phthalate
              MiBP: mono-isobutyl phthalate
              Most common phthalate added to nail polish.
              • DEHP: di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (HMW) *, **, ***
              MEHP: mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
              Most widely-added phthalate to polyvinyl
              chloride (PVC) to make products flexible.
              • DEP: diethyl phthalate (LMW)
              MEP: monoethyl phthalate
              Most common phthalate added to personal
              care products to enhance fragrance.
              • DiDP: di-isodecyl phthalate (HMW) *, **, ***
              • DiNP: di-isononyll phthalate (HMW) *, **, ***
              Most common phthalate added as a softener
              in the manufacture of toys and childcare products, such as bath toys, drinking straws,
              and rubber ducks.
              • DnHP: di-n- hexyl phthalate *
              • DnOP: di-n-octyl phthalate (LMW) **, ***
              * Listed in California’s Proposition 65 as a reproductive and developmental toxicant.
              ** Listed in California’s AB1108 (Ma and Huffman). The bill, if passed, will ban use in the manufacture of any toy or childcare article intended for use by a child under three years of age.
              *** European Union banned as a phthalate softener in the manufacture of toys and childcare articles.

              Read Labels to avoid phthalates.

              The most common products using phthalate compounds are:
              PVC Products
              Phthalates are frequently added to PVC (vinyl) products to soften and make more flexible. If a plastic product is flexible, it probably contains phthalates unless the label specifically says it does not.
              Personal Care Products
              Phthalates are often added to personal care products, such as nail polish, perfumes, deodorants, hair gels, shampoos, soaps, hair sprays, and body lotions, to help lubricate other substances in the formula and to carry fragrances.

              Phthalates must be listed among the ingredients on product labels, unless they are added as a part of the “fragrance.” Under current law, they can then simply be labeled “fragrance,” even though they may make up 20% or more of the product.

              Many companies have voluntarily removed phthalates from their products. A company will usually label its product “phthalate-free.” If unsure, call the company.

              If you can’t get information from the manufacturer, look for alternatives.

              How can I recognize plastic toys and containers containing phthalates?

              All plastics are not the same. One easy way to recognize plastic toys, clothing, bottles, food and beverage storage containers, and/or food wrap that may contain phthalate compounds is to look for the number 3 inside the universal recycling symbol usually molded into the plastic on the bottom of the product.

              Avoid products with the number 3 within the arrows and the letters “V” or “PVC” below the arrows.

              Choose products with the numbers 1,2, 4 and 5 within the arrows. Many companies use phthalate-free substances such as polypropylene (PP), recycling code 5, to manufacture plastic products.

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