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Biological control of fusarium outdoors

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
    To use Trichoderma-- Mix 1 L of Liquid Trichoderma thoroughly with 100 L of water (distilled water) in a plastic cup. For drenching apply this solution to the root zone of the plants. However, if your plants are already at their peak, you may not see an effect from adding this microbe. Its best in the beginning, to apply this fungus to the seed and it will colonize the plant’s root system as it grows. Or you can apply it directly into the planting area, when planting your living plant. Early application is important and key when using Trichodermato for good root health. You are doing a super job and your plants look amazing!!!Good luck.😎
    Still haven't got my hands on the trichoderma. Hopefully today.
    I know it isn't optimum use later in life, but it could help with my theory of overpopulating the rhizosphere with good organisms and making life hard for the fusarium.
    That's why I like the idea of that Mycostop, even later on. The bacteria it has is supposedly parasitic to the fusarium.
    Thanks for the compliment. I take pride in my little hobby these days. Nothing tastes like sungrown organic budsπŸ‘

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    So far so good. They are all looking really good. The Golden Cobra top was pretty darn close to 100% this morning. When the sun got on it it barely changed a hair.
    I gave another compost tea this morning brewed with coconut water for it's sugar source. Probably skip the compost tea/ seaweed thing tomorrow morning and just give them some coconut water. The plants and soil always love coconut water and the gibberillins and other hormones in there can't hurt. Then I will continue with the ash, seaweed, compost tea applications.

    A little history on the test subject the Golden Cobra. It is a feminized seed, cross between a Grape Kush and a Tangie. All seeds were started outdoors April 15th. Plant is now 9 feet tall and has been growing a steady 2-3 inches a day through it's vegetative life, including when showing signs of fusarium.
    Here is the top in the morning.
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    And after a couple hours of sun

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  • Creeperpark
    replied
    To use Trichoderma-- Mix 1 L of Liquid Trichoderma thoroughly with 100 L of water (distilled water) in a plastic cup. For drenching apply this solution to the root zone of the plants. However, if your plants are already at their peak, you may not see an effect from adding this microbe. Its best in the beginning, to apply this fungus to the seed and it will colonize the plant’s root system as it grows. Or you can apply it directly into the planting area, when planting your living plant. Early application is important and key when using Trichodermato for good root health. You are doing a super job and your plants look amazing!!!Good luck.😎

    Leave a comment:


  • Creeperpark
    replied
    Having a major heat wave in the West and N West US and Canada at this time, with excessive heat baking those areas. I thought you may be one of those guys living in those areas. My photos above are for the grows living in very hot areas, (100f or 37.7c plus) dealing with excessive heat and drought. 😎

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    Well 420, sunlight just got off the plant and it was 37C today (99F)
    Top is almost 100%.
    The big question is will it still do it's wilt first thing tomorrow morning???

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    What the plant should look like. Purple Romulan with no infection.

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
    The fungus Trichoderma viride will control the fusarium wilt nematodes. No disrespect intended. 😎
    All cool. Just my thought was this thread was to document some real life results not debate what the problem was.
    Anyways water under the bridge. I am supposed to be getting some trichoderma from a buddy today πŸ‘

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  • Creeperpark
    replied
    The fungus Trichoderma viride will control the fusarium wilt nematodes. No disrespect intended. 😎

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  • Creeperpark
    replied
    Once fusarium wilt infects a plant, there is no effective treatment, and the plant will die very quickly. I don't see that in your plant, however, I do see you do know what you are doing, by the looks of your plants. She looks good to me and will give you some nice flowers. Now in 7 days you come back and show me a yellow plant that is losing all its leaves and the roots are rotting, and I will agree. Those are very pretty plants. 😎

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
    Get those hot rocks off the ground next to your plant because they collect solar heat from the Sun and is lot of your problem. Pile the mulch on heavy and wide to keep the plant cool. 😎
    Can't help it if you can't recognize the early signs of fusarium. We all know what full blown fusarium looks like.
    The rocks are to keep the birds from digging up my mounds. Funny but back in the day guerilla growing the very best plants always grew right in the cliffs completely surrounded by baking hot rocks. Through many a heat wave.
    I can grow plants to.

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  • Creeperpark
    replied
    Get those hot rocks off the ground next to your plant because they collect solar heat from the Sun and is lot of your problem. Pile the mulch on heavy and wide to keep the plant cool. 😎

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
    You don't have Fusarium Wilt on the plant above, but you do have heat stress. Plants wilt in the full sun daily and don't be fooled by it. You can water all you want and the next day the plant will wilt and do the same thing. Add more mulch, however, I don't like hardwood mulch because it ties up the nitrogen and gets hot, and doesn't cool very well. I always us straw hay or native grass. Spread the hay wide a couple of feet around the plant, and a foot high, to keep the soil cool, wide and deep and hold the moisture in the ground. Your plant looks good. 😎
    If it is not fusarium wilt explain the discoloration on the stalk. Or that the wilt happens first light in the morning with the heavy uptake a plant does then. It actually improves during the heat of the day prior to treatment.
    Sorry going to respectfully disagree with you on that one. This is far from my first rodeo.
    Plant mounds have a foot of soft wood chips on the sides and 3-4 inches of straw on top.

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  • Creeperpark
    replied
    You don't have Fusarium Wilt on the plant above, but you do have heat stress. Plants wilt in the full sun daily and don't be fooled by it. You can water all you want and the next day the plant will wilt and do the same thing. Add more mulch, however, I don't like hardwood mulch because it ties up the nitrogen and gets hot, and doesn't cool very well. I always us straw hay or native grass. Spread the hay wide a couple of feet around the plant, and a foot high, to keep the soil cool, wide and deep and hold the moisture in the ground. Your plant looks good. 😎

    Leave a comment:


  • moose eater
    replied
    My understanding of the mechanism or method with both Pre-Stop and Mycostop, are/is that it attaches to the roots or other plant tissues, preventing the fungus from attaching in those places.

    I still get some -limited- yellowing, then browning in lower inside leaves, but chalk that up to those leaves in that area of the plants being prone to reacting to absence of light, and eventually photosynthesis and N.

    Admittedly, I have two Satori plants at the moment (referenced minimally here in the infirmary, and needing to be photographed), that have mutation to several primary stalks/colas, which I've never seen before. I've attributed this to poor watering technique when I was down south for surgery, and then later in the hospital here, with an inexperienced volunteer assisting in my absence. Either that, or they got a concentrated bit of mineral, etc. that gave them pause. The other cloned plants from the ame mother, in the same mix, with the exact same feed regimen, show none of that.

    Mysteries abound. Good luck.

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  • Great outdoors
    replied
    The actual deformity of the growth tips and canoeing of the upper leaves I agree are heat stroke. But the loss of fluids in the bottom branches and browning inside is definitely fusarium.
    I have dealt with it for a plant or two here or there in the past. But usually later in the season and not my whole crop affected.
    I am very attuned to my plants after 40yrs of growing and notice the slightest changes for better or for worse.
    In the past I would say these were toast being that it is this early in the season. That's why it would be interesting, and rewarding if I can push through. Time will tell but I am seeing good improvement.
    I used to use compost tea quite regularly, but the last couple years I figured my biology of my soil was beyond needing the boost anymore except on rare occasions. This will be a good test.
    Yeah I like the idea of the Mycostop and Pre stop. Just a more direct way of planting the right biology. I can only hope my compost has that biology in there to build.
    I myself like a challenge as well πŸ‘

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  • moose eater
    replied
    I was thinking that some of what you're seeing might well be 'heat stroke' on them.

    But I found Pre-Stop to be more effective than Mycostop with Fusarium Wilt, assuming that's your issue. I beat Fusarium Wilt with Pre-Stop, though the product itself has some less than desirable features, and it's not commercially available in Alaska. I was, however, able to legally have it 'boomeranged' to me, by having a friend in a legal-to-buy Prestop State, receive it at his house, then re-package and send it to me. Our Dept. of Environmental Conservation (Alaska DEC) told me that as long as I wasn't using it commercially, as in, growing crops for market, and only used it on my property, that such an arrangement was legit. (And here I'd gotten a bit excited about yet another opportunity to violate a nonsensical law, when it wasn't a violation at all.. :(

    Down-side includes that it's the consistency of a coarse, dried/powered milk, and requires a lot more volume of the mix when mixing in water, compared to Mycostop, which I also keep on-hand. both products are biofungicides, though Pre-stop is stated to be nearly as, or as effective as chemical fungicides. Both have limited shelf-lives, and both should be kept in a refrigerator to extend their worth.

    The consequence of the consistency of the Pre-stop when mixing, is that, like with powdered milk, clumping is not uncommon, so making a slurry, then further diluting, is advised.

    Good luck. I beat Fusarium, as I stated above, but it took tenacity and stubbornness. Fortunately, much of my lineage or identity comes form Irish ancestors. ;^>)

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