Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Twisted Satori or Three

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
    Super job, those buds look super. Lucky you, I love Satori and is a favorite weed for me. You have a very nice color on those buds. Get yourself a meter for the next time. Every grower should have a EC or a TDS meter as well as a pH meter.😎
    I like her quite a bit as well, but this time around, the happier She became, and the more ripe She got, the more prone to bud rot she was becoming. Only 2 primary colas affected thus far, but that's 2 too many, in my opinion.

    I even got a tiny bit of bud rot in the White Lotus #4 have; rarely seen this in recent years. Though, admittedly, it was a damp spring and summer, and the HRV intake is slowed/constricte4d in the summer by noseeum mesh and a MERV 8 pre-filter, in order to prolong the life of the core between cleanings.

    Between the 2 variables, I've been running about 55% humidity in the shop, though with fairly consistent and voluminous air flow.

    Thanks for the compliments, by the way. I've never used an EC meter, but tried to pay attention to the soilless mix contents, which are still being micro-dialed in.. Closer to good, but not quite there yet. Maybe seeking perfection has been a disability, too. ;^>)

    Comment


      #17
      Mold is a symptom, or side effect of something being out of balance in the environment. If one limits the amount of excess nutrient exposure they give to the plant, they can minimize mold and other common plant problems. 😎

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
        Mold is a symptom, or side effect of something being out of balance in the environment. If one limits the amount of excess nutrient exposure they give to the plant, they can minimize mold and other common plant problems. 😎
        I'd given a clone of each (Satori 2 & 5) to a friend in the bush, who had them under weak lights on maintenance until he could put them in a greenhouse. Most of the summer, when it was relatively warm and sunny (lots of days it wasn't) he had a number of walls open in the greenhouse, so they could catch cross-drafts, and air. He uses a very different base in his mixes than I use, and his crops are typically beautiful.

        He also had the early presence of bud rot with one of the two Satori clones I gifted him.

        In the end, I suspect that She's persnickety about her humidity levels, and may be, if for no other reason than her style of bud formation, prone to bud rot.

        None the less, with two primary colas on the Satori 2 here having early stages of bud rot that wasn't pervasive enough to not be cut out, and the rest retained, and the Satori 5 having none of that thus far, I didn't take too bad of a hit.

        Before this experience, had I chosen which of the 2 I was going to keep, if I had to discard one of them, it would've likely been the Satori 2 I'd have kept. But I believe at this time, I'd give serious thought to retaining the Satori 5, due to the absence of bud rot.

        Mind you, I have scant knowledge at this time if Satori 2 will do as she did last time, and out-produce Satori 5, and my friend in the bush had the reverse experience with them, getting more flower weight from #5. Different settings, mixes, environmental factors, etc., all contributed to the different outcomes, no doubt. Including the fact that he had sun in a greenhouse, and I had 315 CMH and augmentation from some LED floods in each corner of the boxes.

        Comment


          #19
          Moose eater you are keeping up with everything nicely, and you know your stuff really well and thank you for sharing.
          Mold can hide under the epidermis of the leaf, or stem, and can lie dormant, for a long time, without being seen. The spores look for a dark, cool place where air does not circulate well, then the spore sinks its little feet, called "hyphae," into the spaces that make up the surface of leaf. When using clones you are most likely transporting cuttings that have these hyphae attached under the epidermis. Every clone from that plant will have hyphae attached to it and infect any other plants it can call a good host. Before the hyphae become mycelium and start growing on the tissue it will wait for the right conditions. "Boom, mold problem" . I don't use anything that is cloned ever! I only grow from seed every time for a good reason! 😎

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Creeperpark View Post
            Moose eater you are keeping up with everything nicely, and you know your stuff really well and thank you for sharing.
            Mold can hide under the epidermis of the leaf, or stem, and can lie dormant, for a long time, without being seen. The spores look for a dark, cool place where air does not circulate well, then the spore sinks its little feet, called "hyphae," into the spaces that make up the surface of leaf. When using clones you are most likely transporting cuttings that have these hyphae attached under the epidermis. Every clone from that plant will have hyphae attached to it and infect any other plants it can call a good host. Before the hyphae become mycelium and start growing on the tissue it will wait for the right conditions. "Boom, mold problem" . I don't use anything that is cloned ever! I only grow from seed every time for a good reason! 😎
            Thanks.

            Out of consistency and habit, I've been maintaining some of the current mothers from clones for over 20 years; my California Indica (Dronkers' Sensi Seeds, from Amsterdam (circa 1997 from there to home in places not discussed), the original Arjan's Greenhouse Super Lemon Haze (going on 20 years old now), and a couple others that are starting to walk a bit like I do, with a cane and a grimace.

            The Cali Indica I've kept as she has a very distinct UP Up and AWAY high, is an amazingly productive plant, and she's typically easy to trim. She was also the first plant I sorted out after we built our home here, having moved back North from the Coastal area of S. Central Alaska, in 1997.

            Your reference to 'the right conditions' rings true. The HRV is critical, and as described, the bug screening and particulate screening that I place on the intake areas in the summer, cause a reduction in air-changes via pressure restriction. When I go into the shop, and I start smelling musty smells, I know it's past time to clean the core and other parts of the HRV. Therein exists the 'perfect' or 'necessary conditions' for mold.

            In the summer time, when we're watering the veggie gardens outside, I flip the ball valves on the mechanical wall near the shop into a position where they can bypass the softener, and let the various manifolds and sprinklers on stands in the veggie and potato gardens do their thing. Unfortunately, with the differential in temperature between ground water and air temperature, the pipes sweat like a bastard as often as not, and thus, moisture is introduced into an environment that is -sometimes- (not always) struggling for proper air changes.

            It's a known risk, and more easily avoided in the winter, when the restrictions don't exist on the HRV's intake, but winter also brings other similar challenges, like having the unit going into auto-defrost mode every 12 minutes or so (by disconnecting the thermistor in the circuit board, to cause it to panic.. more or less to my and its benefit.. but sometimes....) Some of the down-sides of living in an extremely efficient, warm, tight house that relies on 'imported air' from such devices, and knowing that in the Sub-Arctic, where we need HRV's and the like the most, happens to also be the places where they function the most poorly. Murphy strikes again!! ;^>)

            I keep hoping that Venn Mar & LifeBreath will make peace with each other, and incorporate Venn Mar's HRV case or 'shell' to LifeBreath's aluminum core, and have a truly winning product, but that's not how capitalism works most of the time.

            Mostly done clipping the Satori #2, and mildly worried about the Satori #5, as it has a purplish hue to the sugar-trim leaves on the flowers reminiscent of what I think is either a zinc or manganese def., and she's close to meeting the Grim reaper, so feeding her anything is off the table. Going to have to decide something or other with her, as the White Lotus #4 and the Goji OG #8 are very nicely cloudy with their trichomes, and the bracts are plump, with pistils fully retracted (except for the smattering of new pistils).

            I've come to believe that indoors, these girls of different strains are like a sorority of women whose cycles all come to align over time to the same basic part of the month. seriously. 4 strains, flipped to 12:12 on different days, with supposedly different ripening times, and they all seem to come at me at once, ripe in the same 3-4 day period. Like growing broccoli, and ending up with 36 heads all at once; a "what do I do NOW??!!" moment, for sure.

            As far as my skill set and ganja production, I often tell folks I've been growing with a hefty dose of beginners luck for decades, and only when I delve too deeply, chasing things down rabbit holes best left alone, do I make things too complicated, and fuck things up worse than they were.. A Buddhist (or other) life's challenge to find satisfaction where it is, instead of looking over another rainbow for Nirvana, so to speak.

            Thanks for the exchange, compliments, input, information, and more. I'm off to finish a glass of Aussie red wine, eat a couple more smoked almonds, and call it a day.

            Take care.

            Comment

            Working...
            X