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Get Rid of Fungus Gnats For Good Using Mosquito Dunks

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  • Smoggy
    replied
    Zapp Em!

    Haven't had em for years in rockwool, hydroton/coco setting;
    but just brought in an apparent virulent strain w/ new plants.
    Import plants had even been treated w/ Thurgicide liq. & beneficial nematodes a week prior!

    Just noticed toast ones inside 1K MH light fixture- theyve been multiplying steadily!

    So gonna employ old [ Non- Toxic] multi-pronged strategy:
    ReDose all ($eedlings and clones are most susceptible) w/ a Fresh batch of nematodes & Gnatrol granules.
    Plus a couple novel devices, i believe made a decisive difference before & haven't heard anyone else reccomend:
    Electronic Mosquito zappers!
    A tight-grid small unit, hooded to reduce glare, placed under table on nighttime timer, was the set up.
    Unfortunately, my prefered Flowtron bk-7 been discontinued for over a decade- apparently a lemon-design. They burnout bulbs prematuely & inner zapper cage plastic breaks down from UVs!
    Like mosquitos these gnats are attracted to light and CO2 from the root exhalation, but since much smaller can fly thru big grid yard zappers.
    A first gen. Stinger UV vacuum fan model tried had weak pull & only lasted till ~year after warranty motor died & had to add finer screen to catch compartment.
    A plug-in nightlight Flea Trap also works good. Enforcer's overpriced and flimsy, but McGuyverable w/ a green Christmas bulb in night light & sticky mouse trap cards from 99c!
    Gonna also build one those U-tube sodabottle yeast CO2 mosquito traps' see what i catch:
    Get em'

    Leave a comment:


  • DocTim420
    replied
    Ghost--and YELLOW CARDS!

    I buy mine on Amazon and clip one to each container. That way, it is easy to identify a "hot plant". IMO, infestation does not instantaneously happen to all the plants at once--rather the little shits migrate from one plant to another. If I can identify and treat the "hot plant" early (the one with the most black dots on the yellow card) then I know in about 14-21 days I will not have another wave of FGs....or at least not as big as what it would have been.

    Saponins too...been playing around with strategic yucca saponin treatments and it seems to help. Kinda new idea...

    Google: "saponin" "pesticide"

    Leave a comment:


  • Ghostin
    replied
    Thanks Doc!

    Yah mule, they sneak up on you with the quickness. At first you think "maybe I spilled some soil on the floor" but then you look closer and it's hundreds of dead insect bodies! Fuckers..

    Leave a comment:


  • Muleskinner
    replied
    Originally posted by Ghostin View Post
    Preventative care is better than active madness so be sure to top your fresh/new soil with MDs. Haven't had gnats since I started using them!
    totally agree, you have to use the BTi when you transplant to knock them down right away. If you go untreated for a week or two the population expodes and then it takes longer for the Bti to work.

    Leave a comment:


  • DocTim420
    replied
    Bits are granulated corncob bits with BTi applied via vegetable oil. Amazon has the best deals...imo. BTW, technically, Bits are not "organic approved" (due to vegetable oil application)--whereas the Dunks are.

    I use Bits at the rate of 5 ml/gallon in water and mix 7.5 ml into the soil surface of plants in 5 gallon containers about once a month or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ghostin
    replied
    Mosquito bits? Is it just the same coarsely granulated product? I'll check em out anyway, thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • DocTim420
    replied
    Try Mosquito Bits instead of Dunks. Cheaper, easier to apply (no crumbling) and they release BTi for about a week or two.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ghostin
    replied
    Hey world,

    Just wanted to share my results with Mosquito Dunks. Crumble them on top of your soil or coco (enough powder or crumbs to lightly coat the soil ~ .5-2tsp each depending on size), water, and let them work their magic. They really work to effectively rid you of fungus gnats (or mosquitoes, lol) in about a week or so. Preventative care is better than active madness so be sure to top your fresh/new soil with MDs. Haven't had gnats since I started using them!

    Leave a comment:


  • Loc Dog
    replied
    It does not make sense to let it dry out, since it is bacteria. It is meant to be put into ponds to kill mosquito larvae.

    I stock piled RO water in my office, and threw in mosquito dunks, like you can get at home depot, and let hem float in it for a few days before mixing with nutes and watering coco. Doing that I finally got rid of them completely. Also yellow sticky traps will get any stragglers.

    I had them like a plague, when first started using coco. Would be breathing them in. I heard people say the come in bricks of dry coco, but not sure. This is from wikipedia -

    Fungus gnats are typically harmless to healthy plants - and humans - but can inflict extensive damage to seedlings; their presence can indicate more serious problems. In houseplants, the presence of fungus gnats may indicate overwatering; they may be feeding on roots that have been immersed in water too long and are thus rotting, or the gnats may be attracted to fungus growing in saturated topsoil. Consequently, allowing the soil to dry may reduce their numbers.[7] The pests are sometimes also managed by placing a layer of sand[8][9]or indoor mulch on top of the soil around plants; by introducing Hypoaspis miles mites or applying the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis (var. israelensis) to kill gnat larvae; by drenching the soil annually in an insecticidal soap; or by applying detergents and nicotine from tobacco brewed into a toxic tea.[citation needed] Hydrogen peroxide can be mixed with water and used to kill fungus gnats.[4][1]
    Since the gnats are weak fliers, fan-based traps as well as other fly-killing devices may be used to help control free-flying gnats, especially indoors. There are a number of toxic and non-toxic methods of controlling fungus gnats and their larvae, including nematodes, diatomaceous earth, or powdered cinnamon.

    Leave a comment:


  • moses wellfleet
    replied
    Originally posted by Muleskinner View Post
    "letting the soil dry out" is a relative term. You don't want it to get dry enough to stress the plant. I've noticed no improvement in gnats with the soil getting dryer, they seem to thrive no mattter what.

    I think the Gnatrol (Vectobac) is only effective in the soil for 48 hours, I wouldn't wait more than 3 days to water if you have a heavy infestation. If your soil is still very wet after 3 days you probably need more perlite and less compost in your mix.
    Hey thanx friend. Yes my common sense is telling me to rather water it in than try wait it out with dry soil!

    Leave a comment:


  • Muleskinner
    replied
    "letting the soil dry out" is a relative term. You don't want it to get dry enough to stress the plant. I've noticed no improvement in gnats with the soil getting dryer, they seem to thrive no mattter what.

    I think the Gnatrol (Vectobac) is only effective in the soil for 48 hours, I wouldn't wait more than 3 days to water if you have a heavy infestation. If your soil is still very wet after 3 days you probably need more perlite and less compost in your mix.

    Leave a comment:


  • moses wellfleet
    replied
    I am giving Vectobac as a soil drench, BTi is the active ingredient. All advice says to let the soil dry out because the gnats love moist mediums. Surely the BTi will be less effective if the soil dries out? Should I just keep drenching the soil with the Vectobac? Decisions decisions

    Anybody else been down this road before and know which fork I should take?

    Leave a comment:


  • originalOutkast
    replied
    Merit 75 works really well.

    Leave a comment:


  • DONAJTHEIII
    replied
    Originally posted by JayTrinity View Post
    Hi is this a fungus gnat? I used time release composted chicken manure and put on top.

    The worm photo is a long wet gross worm, no black head but I might look again.
    Its 100F every day the soil was dry, I had to water just now so thats why its wet although its obviously way to damp over all.
    And yes I have flying bugs but hard to get them in my scope to photo.
    View Image

    View Image

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/GNATROL-WDG-...YA2-p9CvVO8htg

    VIDEO OF MAGGOTS!
    http://tinypic.com/player.php?v=2dqi...9#.V3SXbTV0SUk


    first photo looks like a springtail. Second is fungus gnat larvae.


    hope this helps !


    Leave a comment:


  • Muleskinner
    replied
    The first bug doesn't appear to be root aphid or fungus gnat…I'm stumped. Maybe it's a bug that doesn't bother plants. Here are some pics of the usual suspects:

    http://urban-gro.com/cultivation-tec...annabis-pests/

    http://www.arbico-organics.com/categ...m-solver-guide

    Leave a comment:

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