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Get Rid of Fungus Gnats For Good Using Mosquito Dunks

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  • stucrew
    replied
    Gnat Nix

    I use Gnat Nix. I grow in smart pots and put a good 2 inch layer of Gnat Nix on the top of my coco and rarely will I ever see a gnat. It works the best if you get it on as soon as you put your plants in the pots. Before I found out about this I had the little devils for 2 grows. I got so fed up I took some Raid for flying insects and sprayed in my rooms to kill the little bastards then started putting the gnat nix on and haven't had a problem with the since. More than 2 years gnat free.

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  • mean mr.mustard
    replied
    I noticed it necessary to redose the top dressing every month and a half or so.

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  • Ghostin
    replied
    A late update:

    I made homemade compost over the winter and about 4-5 months in I stopped turning it. By spring, it was absolutely infested with fungus gnats. I stupidly decided to spread it across my plot and, well, I had outdoor fungus gnats in my garden, lol. I purchased 30million nematodes from amazon, and threw each sponge piece into a 5 gallon bucket, mixed it up and spread it around. It took about 1-2 weeks but they disappeared and are now all gone. They were more expensive but damn, they work better than MDs. Maybe try that if you're experiencing medium-heavy infestations.

    Peace!

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  • AgentPothead
    replied
    Originally posted by biobizz View Post
    i bought mosquito dunks. is one dunk enough for 130gallon?

    also ordered sone chinese mosquito smoke bombs muhahaha
    The website says 100 square feet of surface water per dunk. I'm gonna say yeah one should do it.

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  • biobizz
    replied
    i bought mosquito dunks. is one dunk enough for 130gallon?

    also ordered sone chinese mosquito smoke bombs muhahaha

    Leave a comment:


  • biobizz
    replied
    Originally posted by Dog Star View Post
    Cinnamon is a atomic bomb for gnat larvae,never ever i use Bti as he could not kill them totaly as i use fabric pots and haved some gnat larves that was like ninjas,hidding in a fabric pot while i watering and always bastards survived Bti.

    After i gived them cinnamon chalenge they dissapeared like they never was made me problems... zero gnats and gnat larvaes
    as the question how to use was never answered.. i am chriouse.. anyone else knows more about cinnamon the ultimate gnats killer?

    Leave a comment:


  • Muleskinner
    replied
    Sorry....it's just luck! I use organic soil with only dry nutes and the fungus gnats LOVE it. They will always love rich organic soil mediums, the only things that stop them are Bti (Gnatrol or mosquito dunks) and/or beneficial nematodes.

    You might occasionally get a batch of soil or compost that doesn't have them, but if it's warm outside and they can get into the bags or containers they will quickly move in & multiply.
    Last edited by Muleskinner; 06-13-2018, 18:26.

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  • Mikell
    replied
    Overwater or otherwise create conditions to their favour and they'll return.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Honestly I struggled with fungus gnats for a long time. My sticky traps I’d poke into the soil would be covered with them. I’ve tried gnatnix and tons of other ways to try to get rid of them. I recently began to start growing completely organic, no bottles nutrients at all. And I swear to you all my gnats are gone. I didn’t change anything else except that and they’re gone. I know beneficial bacteria’s can out compete many bad things in your soil or coat pests and help irradicate them and I think this is what happened. So maybe in me seeing this result can help someone else out

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  • Smoggy
    replied
    Addendum:
    I was paranoid reading here so much Horrors on Root Aphids, that after seeing some Aphid looking bug in my original pots, I spent meticulous hours trying to catch some samples. Before i could take em to Ag. Commissioner for ID, i came across em as "Hypoapsis Miles" pic - Don't know where they originally came from, but fortunately they manage to get in everything- find em even in new clone plugs. They'd apparently been part of team keeping my old collection fungus-gnat free. Theyre hopefully surviving, dieting on perpetual spring-tails now.

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  • Smoggy
    replied
    Confirmed Kill

    So much debate, on this...
    & wow- Times fly's!!
    I never reported final results on this easy non-toxic multi-pronged treatment - It worked 100%.
    I unplugged mosquito light long ago.
    In Veg and flwr rooms, where plants always present, there's not been 1 fungus gnats seen since.
    Although, haven't brought in new infested plants/medium; im confident the inoculation with bti & predator nematodes is essential Early prevention to avoid playing catch-up & bugs in you buds.
    It took about 2 months to get at all em: New eggs, larvae, & humping flyers...

    Forget about burning synthetic pesticide vapors in your garden.
    Bummed me out - they burned those coils like incense @ gym in Saigon, while im working out on vacation!

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  • DocTim420
    replied
    My post from a different thread--
    Originally posted by DocTim420 View Post
    As we all know, Bacillus thuringiensis serotype israelensis (BTi) is effective natural pesticide to control Fungus Gnats. So how do we measure BTi? Which product is the best "deal" for buying BTi?

    Well, that question requires a little back of the envelope math before one can actually compare different BTi products. You see, BTi is measured in International Toxic Units (ITU) at various concentrations ranging between 100 to 7,000 ITU/mg. The "Active Ingredient Percentage" on the label is just part of the story...gotta include the amount of ITU/mg.

    An 8% "active ingredient" product formulated with 1200 ITU/mg has 96 ITU (1200 x 0.08) for each milligram of product.

    A 3% "active ingredient" product formulated with 7000 ITU/mg has 210 ITU (7000 x 0.03) for each milligram of product.

    Hmmm, that means the 3% products has nearly twice the amount of ITU than the 8% product. WTF?

    Also, application methods are different. Some products are RTU (ready to use) for both soil and water applications, others like Vectobac require the preparation of fermentation slurry to activate the BTi, and some are only water soluble (not to be mixed directly with the grow medium).

    Since not all BTi products are "equal", I have prepared a comparison of the "usual suspects" and correlated everything to cents per million ITU.



    Gnatrol is the most affordable, but can only be used in a liquid suspension form--you can not add the powder directly to the grow medium.

    Bits is the 2nd most affordable and can be added to both water and the directly to the potting soil. When added to the water, BTi is instantly activated...but when mixed with potting soil, BTi is gradually activated (time release of sorts) for about 21 days. Bits are basically corn cob bits sprayed with BTi.

    Dunks are slow acting (gradual release as the "donut" dissolves) and can be added to the potting soil directly--but must be crumbled to a powder like consistency (PIA). Dunks are pressed donuts made of gypsum and cork bits sprayed with BTi.

    I have no experience with Vectobac products but a special fermentation slurry must be prepared before the BTi is activated (an additional step that most BTi products do not require).

    Microbelift BMC is already in liquid form and like Gnatrol, it must be diluted in water before use...and from my analysis, is not a bargain.

    I previously used both Gnatrol and Dunks, but for the past few years I exclusively use Bits for my source of BTi ($120 for 5 gallon bucket). I mix Bits directly to my water (30 ml/20 gallon rez), mix Bits directly in the potting soil (5 ml/5 gallon container) and mix Bits with my top dressing fertility (7.5 ml/5 gallon container).

    One product for all. Admittedly, I could use Dunks form my water rez, but since that rez is used and refilled daily, I prefer the faster acting Bits over the slow release Dunks.

    So there you have it. If there are other BTi products you want included in my analysis, please let me know and I will be more than happy to add them.
    Last edited by DocTim420; 05-27-2017, 15:00. Reason: typo

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  • troutman
    replied
    Last year I tried something else for fungus gnats. Good old mosquito coils.

    I tried one in my tent and the fungus gnats were not too happy.

    Actually, I think they'll work for any flies bothering you.

    I just placed it on the ground on a fireproof dish and let the smoke invade
    the undergrowth of the plants for 20 minutes. I think a few smokeouts will
    tell the bugs to get lost eventually.

    You can get them on ebay,amazon, and places that sell camping supplies..

    I don't use them all the time. Maybe once every 2 weeks as a preventative medicine.



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  • coxnox
    replied
    How yu use cinammon against FG ?

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  • Dog Star
    replied
    Cinnamon is a atomic bomb for gnat larvae,never ever i use Bti as he could not kill them totaly as i use fabric pots and haved some gnat larves that was like ninjas,hidding in a fabric pot while i watering and always bastards survived Bti.

    After i gived them cinnamon chalenge they dissapeared like they never was made me problems... zero gnats and gnat larvaes

    Leave a comment:

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