Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chanting Growers Group (2013-∞)

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #61
    "Kosen-rufu is an unprecedented endeavour for the happiness of all humanity. Precisely because it is so difficult, the benefit we accrue through our efforts is immeasurable."

    SGI Newsletter No. 8713, Learning from the Writings of Nichiren Daishonin: The Teachings for Victory. [44] “The Workings of Brahma and Shakra,” Fostering Youth of Genuine Commitment Who Can Change History, translated 7th Feb. 2013, from the September 2012 issue of the Daibyakurenge.
    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    Comment


      #62
      The Daishonin states,
      "The best way to attain Buddhahood
      is to encounter a good friend."*
      Let's cherish all who are always there for us,
      and at the same time,
      let's we ourselves be the one who supports others.
      SGI is indeed a gathering of 'Good Friends'.**


      Daisaku Ikeda

      *"Three Tripitaka Masters Pray for Rain" - WND-I, page 598
      ** Good friends - http://www.sgi.org/buddhism/buddhist...d-friends.html
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        #63
        "'If rumour spreads that you appear to be a votary of the Lotus Sutra, both those who are close to you and those who are not will unexpectedly admonish you as if they were your true friends, saying, "If you believe in the priest Nichiren, you will surely be misled. You will also be in disfavour with your lord.” Then, because the plots that people devise are fearsome even to worthy persons, you will certainly abandon your faith in the Lotus Sutra. . . .

        "'Leave such people strictly alone. The time will certainly come when, by the workings of [the heavenly deities, including] Brahma, Shakra,[1] and other gods, the entire Japanese nation will simultaneously take faith in the Lotus Sutra. At that time, I am convinced, many people will insist that they too have believed since the very beginning.' (WND-1, 800)

        "...The Daishonin warns his young disciple that people feigning friendly concern will tell him: 'If you believe in the priest Nichiren, you will surely be misled. You will also be in disfavour with your lord' (WND-1, 800). Noting that even wise people can be taken in by others’ evil machinations, he urges Tokimitsu to be on guard and not fall into the trap of discarding his faith in the Lotus Sutra.

        "The Daishonin then goes on to clarify the fundamental pattern by which devilish functions seek to obstruct the propagation of the correct teaching of Buddhism: 'Those possessed by a great devil will, once they succeed in persuading a believer to recant, use that person as a means for making many others abandon their faith' (WND-1, 800). As concrete examples of this, he cites the cases of Sho-bo, Noto-bo, and the lay nun of Nagoe,[2] who were once his disciples. He describes them as people who are 'greedy, cowardly, and foolish, [but try to] pass themselves off as wise persons' (cf. WND-1, 800). Those who only pretend to practise the correct teaching, people whose faith has no real substance, easily succumb to the inroads of devilish functions. When obstacles arise, they quickly abandon their faith and then use clever words to justify their actions and urge others to do likewise.

        "After explaining this point, the Daishonin says to Tokimitsu: 'If you allow yourself to be so persuaded, those in Suruga who seem to believe in the Lotus Sutra, as well as the others who are about to take faith in it, will all discard the sutra without exception' (WND-1, 800). I can’t help but feel that he is trying to convey to Tokimitsu: 'You are the hope for kosen-rufu in Suruga Province! So please stand firm!'

        "Wholeheartedly encouraging a single individual is the start of encouraging countless others. As such, ongoing, dedicated efforts to train and foster the precious young people in one’s own local area into people of genuine commitment in faith form the eternal foundation for kosen-rufu."


        SGI Newsletter No. 8713, Learning from the Writings of Nichiren Daishonin: The Teachings for Victory. [44] “The Workings of Brahma and Shakra,” Fostering Youth of Genuine Commitment Who Can Change History, translated 7th Feb. 2013, from the September 2012 issue of the Daibyakurenge.

        [1] Brahma and Shakra: Two deities of ancient Indian mythology. In Buddhism, they are said to have the role of protecting and watching over the world as leaders of the heavenly deities, the protective forces of the universe.
        [2] Disciples of the Daishonin who later abandoned their faith. Sho-bo is said to have begun doubting the Daishonin around the time of the Izu Exile in 1261. Noto-bo is said to have lost his faith around 1271. The lay nun of Nagoe, the wife of Hojo Tomotoki, a younger brother of the third regent Yasutoki, abandoned her faith around the time of the Tatsunokuchi Persecution in 1271.
        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

        Comment


          #64
          "Whatever trouble occurs, regard it as no more than a dream, and think only of the Lotus Sutra."

          (Letter to the Brothers - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 502) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 11th, 2013
          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

          Comment


            #65
            GOOD FRIENDS

            Friends"People affect each other in subtle and complex ways, and it is important to develop the ability to discern the nature of that influence. According to Buddhism, 'bad' friends are those who encourage our weaknesses. A truly good friend is someone with the compassion and courage to tell us even those things we would prefer not to hear, which we must confront if we are to develop and grow in our lives."

            Ananda, one of Shakyamuni Buddha's closest disciples, once asked him: "It seems to me that by having good friends and advancing together with them, one has already halfway attained the Buddha way. Is this way of thinking correct?"

            Shakyamuni replied, "Ananda, this way of thinking is not correct. Having good friends and advancing together with them is not half the Buddhist way but all the Buddhist way."

            This may seem surprising, as Buddhism is often viewed as a solitary discipline in which other people might be seen as more of a hindrance than a help. However, to polish and improve our lives ultimately means to develop the quality of our interpersonal relationships--a far more challenging task than any solitary discipline. Our practice of Buddhism only finds meaning within the context of these relationships.

            From another perspective, given that Buddhist practice of polishing and aiming to improve our lives from within is a constant challenge and a difficult process, it is only natural that we need support from others also dedicated to walking a correct path in life, trying also to create value in their lives.

            SGI President Daisaku Ikeda has written, "Having good friends is like being equipped with a powerful auxiliary engine. When we encounter a steep hill or an obstacle, we can encourage each other and find the strength to keep pressing forward." And as Nichiren (1222--1282) wrote: "Even a feeble person will not stumble if those supporting him are strong, but a person of considerable strength, when alone, may lose his footing on an uneven path..."

            In Nichiren Buddhism, good friends are known as zenchishiki or good influences, while akuchishiki refers to bad influences. People affect each other in subtle and complex ways, and it is important to develop the ability to discern the nature of that influence. According to Buddhism, "bad" friends are those who encourage our weaknesses. In Nichiren's words: "Evil friends are those who, speaking sweetly, deceiving, flattering and making skillful use of words, win the hearts of the ignorant and destroy their goodness of mind."

            Even when intentions are good, the degree of our positive influence on each other will vary. Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, founder of the Soka Gakkai, used the following illustration. Say you have a friend who needs a certain amount of money. Giving your friend the money they need is an act of small good, while helping them find a job is an act of medium good. However, if your friend is really suffering because of a basic tendency toward laziness, then constantly helping him or her out may only perpetuate negative habits. In this case, true friendship is helping that person change the lazy nature that is the deep cause of their suffering.

            A truly good friend is someone with the compassion and courage to tell us even those things we would prefer not to hear, which we must confront if we are to develop and grow in our lives.

            Ultimately, however, whether people are good or evil influences in our lives is up to us. In Buddhist terms, the best kind of zenchishiki is one who leads us to strengthen our own faith and practice in order to thoroughly transform our karma. To quote Nichiren again, "the best way to attain Buddhahood is to encounter a zenchishiki, or good friend." Further, Nichiren comments that Devadatta, the cousin of Shakyamuni who tried to kill him and divide the Buddhist order, was "the foremost good friend to Thus Come One Shakyamuni. In this age as well, it is not one's allies, but one's powerful enemies who assist one's progress."

            This expresses a key concept in Buddhism. Due to the immense transformative powers of Buddhist practice, even "bad" friends can have a good influence if we make our relationships with them into opportunities to examine, reform and strengthen our lives. The ideal is ultimately to develop the kind of all-encompassing compassion expressed by Nichiren when he wrote that his first desire was to lead to enlightenment the sovereign who had persecuted him, repeatedly exiling and even attempting to behead him.


            [Courtesy January 2004 SGI Quarterly]
            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

            Comment


              #66
              "(I say this for your sake. I know your faith has always been admirable, but now you must strengthen it more than ever. Only then will the ten demon daughters lend you even greater protection. You need not seek far for an example.) Everyone in Japan, from the sovereign on down to the common people, without exception has tried to do me harm, but I have survived until this day. You should realise that this is because, although I am alone, I have firm faith."

              (The Supremacy of the Law - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 614) Selection source: Kyo no Hosshin, Seikyo Shimbun, February 20th, 2013
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                #67
                "In the frigid cold of the German winter in 1777, a 28-year-old leader ventured forth on horseback on a long journey deep into the mountains. Riding into the biting north wind, undeterred by sleet or hail, he pressed onwards to meet with an unknown young man who had written to him about his suffering.[1] This youthful leader who was motivated purely by his desire to help and encourage someone in anguish was none other than Goethe, whom we so greatly esteem and admire. . . .

                "Goethe declared: 'Noble let man be.' [2] Don’t allow yourself to be discouraged and depressed by trivial, petty things, easily giving up, slacking off, or letting fear overtake you. Be dignified! Stand tall with pride! This was the spirit of Goethe."


                SGI Newsletter No. 8723, SGI President Ikeda’s Speech Excerpts, excerpts are from SGI Newsletter Nos. 7911 and 7914, reissued 19th Feb. 2013

                [1] The young man whom Goethe visited was Friedrich V. L. Plessing (1749–1806), who later became a well-known scholar.
                [2] Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “The Godlike,” in Selected Poems, edited by Christopher Middleton and translated by Michael Hamburger, et al., Goethe’s Collected Works (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1983), vol. 1, p. 79.
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  #68
                  People judge the worth of a leader by their voices.
                  I hope therefore, as leaders,
                  that when we are reassuring and encouraging our friends and fellow members.
                  our voices emanate with warmth and confidence!
                  In fact, sincerely striving to make such efforts
                  helps us to polish our own personalities.


                  Daisaku Ikeda
                  Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                  Comment


                    #69
                    Taking the initiative--
                    that is the hallmark of a leader.
                    Merely thinking up schemes or strategies
                    won't create any kind of development or growth.
                    Let's be victorious by showing
                    earnest and sincere efforts and actions!


                    Daisaku Ikeda
                    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                    Comment


                      #70
                      "The Daishonin states: 'The single word "belief" is the sharp sword with which one confronts and overcomes fundamental darkness or ignorance' (OTT, 119–20). As this passage indicates, belief, or faith, in the Mystic Law is the only force that can overcome this fundamental darkness or ignorance. As I have mentioned, Buddhism is, first and last, a struggle between the Buddha and devilish functions. That is why it is crucial for us to make unceasing efforts to strengthen our faith and manifest our Buddha nature. As the Daishonin says: 'Strengthen your faith day by day and month after month. Should you slacken in your resolve even a bit, devils will take advantage' (WND-1, 997). These words are our eternal guideline."

                      SGI Newsletter No. 8713, Learning from the Writings of Nichiren Daishonin: The Teachings for Victory. [44] “The Workings of Brahma and Shakra,” Fostering Youth of Genuine Commitment Who Can Change History, translated 7th Feb. 2013, from the September 2012 issue of the Daibyakurenge.
                      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                      Comment


                        #71
                        "More valuable than treasures in a storehouse are the treasures of the body, and the treasures of the heart are the most valuable of all."

                        (The Three Kinds of Treasure - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 851) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 9th, 2013
                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                        Comment


                          #72
                          Each and every single day is a precious treasure!
                          It's only through our unceasing efforts
                          that we can open up the way to glory and triumph.
                          Let's throw ourselves totally into challenging the challenges we face now
                          so that by the end of each day we can proudly declare
                          "Today too, I have won!"


                          Daisaku Ikeda
                          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                          Comment


                            #73
                            "If in a single moment of life we exhaust the pains and trials of millions of kalpas, then instant after instant there will arise in us the three Buddha bodies with which we are eternally endowed. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is just such a 'diligent' practice."

                            (Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 790, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 214) Selection source: Kyo no Hosshin, Seikyo Shimbun, November 21st, 2012
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              #74
                              I read with care and enjoy everything you write brother Thomas, it is always usefull!

                              Like a Lion!!!! RAWR
                              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!
                              My soul smells of Canapa!

                              sigpic

                              Comment


                                #75
                                Just happy to be here

                                Nam myoho renge kyo
                                (Medical Patient In Compliance)

                                Nam myoho renge kyo !! Mugi wasshin
                                your bud
                                babba

                                Peace/ Be here now

                                Babba's Farm L.L.C.


                                The political views, or conspiracy theories, of icmag ownership, do not reflect my own views and are sole property of the participants

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X