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    #31
    Wow! The old thread has already had over 1,000 hits since we moved! I'm sure there are going to be a lot of people copying stuff out of there for awhile. As a source of information, there is nothing quite like it on the web.

    We all did it together. It's so readable!!! Chris, I hope you will seriously guard that priceless treasure!

    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    THANKS TO SKIP AND GYPSY!!!

    T
    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    Comment


      #32
      "If you want to understand the causes that existed in the past, look at the results as they are manifested in the present. And if you want to understand what results will be manifested in the future, look at the causes that exist in the present."

      (The Opening of the Eyes - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 279) Selection source: Thoughts on the New Human Revolution, Seikyo Shimbun, January 14th, 2013
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        #33
        Instead of comparing ourselves with others
        it's far better to focus on winning over ourselves!
        Today, more than yesterday,
        tomorrow, more than today,
        it's important that each day of our lives is spent
        polishing and developing ourselves.


        Daisaku Ikeda
        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

        Comment


          #34
          "Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) grappled with the question of human selfishness, including his own, pondering the cause of people’s self-centeredness and estrangement from others. He later reached the conclusion: “They and I are one. Everyone alive now, or in the past or the future, are all one; they are all one with me. My life is dependent on theirs, and their lives dependent on mine.”[1] This became his guiding philosophy. His view of human life has much in common with Buddhism, which teaches that we remain linked to those in our lives throughout the three existences of past, present, and future, and that self and other are inseparable. It is important, therefore, for us to encourage each other and lead lives of great meaning and value by allowing the unsurpassed jewel of Buddhahood to shine forth brightly within us.

          "When we help others shine, our lives shine, too. Dialogue enables us to appreciate our connection with others. The path of dialogue is the path of joy for both ourselves and others; it is the path of happiness."


          SGI Newsletter No. 8523, To My Young Friends—Leaders of a New Age, [3] Bringing People Together—The Power of Human Ties—Part 3 [of 3], from the 29th March, 2012, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated 23rd May 2012

          [1] Translated from Japanese. Leo Tolstoy, Torusutoi Nikkisho (Abridged Diary of Tolstoy), translated by Yoshitaro Yokemura (Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1954), p. 111.
          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

          Comment


            #35
            "Strengthen your faith day by day and month after month."

            ("On Persecutions Befalling the Sage", The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 997
            Selection source: Myoji no Gen, Seikyo Shimbun, May 23rd, 2012
            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

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              #36
              "Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life, and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo no matter what happens."

              (Happiness in This World - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 681) Selection source: SGI Sweden member's experience, Seikyo Shimbun, February 15th, 2013
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                #37
                "Nichiren Buddhism teaches that the highest life-state of Buddhahood does not exist somewhere separate from us ordinary human beings or our daily reality, but within us. It teaches that we ourselves are Buddhas.

                "Nichiren Daishonin likens the difficulty people have in believing this truth to the inability to see one’s own eyelashes because they are so close. In the same way that beautiful blossoms emerge from the rough-barked branches of the cherry tree, he says, we ordinary people can bring forth the life-state of Buddhahood from within our lives.[1]

                "In short, it is the ultimate power of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo that brings the supreme flower of life that is Buddhahood to bloom. This is an absolute and unfailing principle."


                SGI Newsletter No. 8716, 63rd Soka Gakkai Headquarters Leaders Meeting, Bringing Forth Flowers of Happiness and Victory in Our Lives, translated 13th Feb. 2013

                [1] The Daishonin writes: “We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts. . . . [It is like the way that] the graceful cherry blossoms come forth from trees” (WND-1, 1137).
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  #38
                  When we sincerely talk with others
                  we naturally will begin to develop trust with them.
                  And when we chant daimoku for the happiness of our friends
                  and courageously take action for their well-being,
                  our own life condition will be elevated.
                  This is the way we will achieve kosen-rufu!


                  Daisaku Ikeda
                  Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                  Comment


                    #39
                    "Today, I would like to make a pledge together with all of you—a pledge to bring flowers of victory into full bloom in our lives.

                    "The life of each one of us is infinitely noble and filled with immeasurable potential. Nichiren Buddhism teaches that even a single day of life is more precious than all the treasures of the universe.

                    "Many scientists have described the human body itself as a universe of its own, with a staggering 60 trillion cells working together in exquisite harmony, constantly defending against threats from without. Our hearts beat approximately 100,000 times a day, pumping roughly eight tons of blood through our bodies. There is an astronomical network of 14 billion neurons in our cerebral cortex alone, with an unlimited power for growth and creativity. That is why it is said that the more we use our brains, the sharper they become."


                    SGI Newsletter No. 8716, 63rd Soka Gakkai Headquarters Leaders Meeting, Bringing Forth Flowers of Happiness and Victory in Our Lives, translated 13th Feb. 2013
                    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                    Comment


                      #40
                      "There is definitely something extraordinary in the ebb and flow of the tide, the rising and setting of the moon, and the way in which summer, autumn, winter, and spring give way to each other. Something uncommon also occurs when an ordinary person attains Buddhahood. At such a time, the three obstacles and four devils will invariably appear, and the wise will rejoice while the foolish will retreat."

                      (The Three Obstacles and Four Devils - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 637) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 14th, 2013
                      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Repaying one's debts of gratitude*
                        is the very spirit of our Buddhist practice.
                        A heart full of appreciation and gratitude
                        is what makes us strong.
                        Let's adorn February -- the traditional month for our dynamic
                        development in introducing others to this practice --
                        with a renewed fresh spirit!


                        Daisaku Ikeda

                        * Gosho, (On Repaying Debts of Gratitude - WND1, page 690), "What can we say, then, of persons who are devoting themselves to Buddhism? Surely they should not forget the debts of gratitude they owe to their parents, their teachers, and their country. But if one intends to repay these great debts of gratitude, one can hope to do so only if one learns and masters Buddhism, becoming a person of wisdom."
                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                        Comment


                          #42
                          "The Daishonin says:

                          "'Make no mistake. If you abandon your faith in the Lotus Sutra now, you will only make yourself the laughing-stock of your foes. Shamelessly pretending friendship, they will try to maneuver you into recanting, with the intention of later laughing at you and letting others ridicule you as well. Let them say all they have to say. Then tell them, “Instead of advising me in the presence of many people, why don’t you admonish yourselves first?” With this remark, abruptly rise from your seat and depart.' (WND-1, 801)

                          "The Daishonin consistently urges Tokimitsu to speak out bravely for his beliefs, to be mentally prepared, and not to be afraid. Telling him to the effect: 'Clearly and boldly refute falsehoods! Now is the crucial time! Fulfill your vow!'

                          "In this way, the Daishonin outlines the spirit that all of his youthful followers should embody. It is none other than the fighting spirit of our ever-youthful SGI. The essence of dialogue is courage and dynamism. The only way to vanquish devilish functions is with a mighty lion’s roar. He indicates, therefore, that youth need to face up to powerful opponents and challenge difficulties. A powerful opponent makes us strong, and difficulties represent opportunities for doing our human revolution."


                          SGI Newsletter No. 8713, Learning from the Writings of Nichiren Daishonin: The Teachings for Victory. [44] “The Workings of Brahma and Shakra,” Fostering Youth of Genuine Commitment Who Can Change History, translated 7th Feb. 2013, from the September 2012 issue of the Daibyakurenge.
                          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                          Comment


                            #43
                            "Although I and my disciples may encounter various difficulties, if we do not harbour doubts in our hearts, we will as a matter of course attain Buddhahood."

                            (The Opening of the Eyes - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Volume 1, page 283) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 13th, 2013
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              #44
                              "Whatever trouble occurs, regard it as no more than a dream, and think only of the Lotus Sutra."

                              (Letter to the Brothers - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Volume 1, page 502) Selection source: Kyo no Hosshin, Seikyo Shimbun, November 23rd, 2012
                              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                              Comment


                                #45
                                "If in a single moment of life we exhaust the pains and trials of millions of kalpas, then instant after instant there will arise in us the three Buddha bodies with which we are eternally endowed. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is just such a 'diligent' practice."

                                (Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 790, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 214) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 6th, 2013
                                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

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