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    #16
    The Wisdom of the Lotus Sutra, Volume five

    pgs. 164-168

    (SGI President Ikeda and Soka Gakkai study department leaders Katsuji Saito, Takanori Endo, and Haruo Suda explore the profound meaning of the Lotus Sutra based on Nichiren Daishonin's lecture on the Lotus Sutra, "The Record of the Orally Transmited Teachings.")

    Ikeda: Bodhisattva Superior Practices is actually a Buddha who is exerting himself at the level of Buddhist practice that enables one to attain enlightenment. In other words, he is the Buddha embodying the simultaneity of cause and effect.

    The original Buddha whose life is without beginning or end could not be revealed without the appearance of Superior Practices. His emergence points to the existence of the “true Buddha of kuon ganjo,” the Buddha enlightened from time without beginning, which far surpasses the idea of an unimaginably remote time called “numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago.”

    Suda: I am much clearer now on a number of points that were somewhat ambiguous.

    This original Buddha whose life is without beginning or end is the Nam-myoho-renge-kyo Thus Come One that we refer to as the Buddha of absolute freedom of kuon ganjo or time without beginning.

    Ikeda: That’s correct.

    Suda: So it becomes clear that time without beginning in this context does not mean the remote past. It transcends the framework, indeed the very concept of time.

    Ikeda: Yes, time without beginning is another name for life that is without beginning or end. It pertains, not to the doctrine of time, but to the doctrine of life.

    The truth in the depths of life, the very life of the universe that continues to function ceaselessly, is referred to by the term time without beginning. This can also be called the “Thus Come One originally endowed with the three enlightened properties.”

    Regarding the term “time without beginning” which in Japanese is kuon ganjo, the Daishonin says, “Kuon means neither created or adorned but remaining in one’s original state” (OTT, 141). “Not created” means inherently endowed; it does not indicate a specific point in time. “Not adorned” means not possessing the thirty-two features and eighty characteristics; it refers to ordinary people just as they are. “Remaining in one’s original state” means eternally existing.

    Kuon signifies Nam-myoho-renge-kyo; it signifies the Gohonzon. When we pray to the Gohonzon, that very instant is beginningless time. For us, each day is beginningless time. Each day we can cause the supreme, pure, eternal life of time without beginning to well forth from our entire being. Each day we start anew from time without beginning, the starting point of life.

    Saito: This is what it means to live based on the mystic principle of the true cause.

    Ikeda: That’s why the present time is the most important. We should not dwell on the past; there is no need to do so. Those who exert themselves fully in the present moment and burn with great hope for the future are the true sages in life.

    In transmitting the essence of the Lotus Sutra to Bodhisattva Superior Practices, Shakyamuni entrusts him with achieving kosen-rufu in the Latter Day of the Law. Therefore, when we stand up in earnest and work for the propagation of the eternal Mystic Law, we experience the eternity of time without beginning in each moment.

    President Toda always regarded propagation of the Mystic Law as his personal responsibility, vowing to realize it without relying on anyone else. And he prayed that youth would rise up with the same great spirit of faith.

    On one occasion before a gathering of about twenty youth, he suddenly called out in a powerful voice: “I will accomplish kosen-rufu!” He then had each person there repeat these words: One after another they fervently exclaimed, “I will achieve kosen-rufu by myself!” Some spoke with weak and unsure voices. Some were taken aback. And some later abandoned their faith. President Toda’s sole wish was for young people to stand up with the same determination that he himself cherished. This was his strict compassion. My feelings toward members of the youth division are exactly the same.

    At any rate, although the doctrine concerning Bodhisattva Superior Practices is extremely difficult, since it is the very heart and essence of the Lotus Sutra, let’s pursue our investigation a little further.

    Saito: So to confirm what we’ve covered so far, while the Lotus Sutra expounds the essential transmission from Shakyamuni as the Buddha enlightened since the remote past to Bodhisattva Superior Practices, the Law that is handed down is not the twenty-eight chapter Lotus Sutra, but the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo that is contained in the sutra’s depths.

    Ikeda: That’s right. But I think the expression “handed down” may invite misunderstanding. Fundamentally, Bodhisattva Superior Practices is already an entity of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. Since he has possessed this Law eternally, the purpose of the ceremony is merely to verify that he is qualified and charged with spreading Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in the Latter Day; it provides proof of his status.

    Endo: Then if I may return once again to the analogy of inheritance of a family estate, it’s something like a document from the parent certifying the transference of assets.

    Ikeda: I think you could say that. The “Supernatural Powers” chapter is the letter of certification. Compared to the Mystic Law itself, it is merely a shadow. To illustrate, let us say that a child receives ten million Yen form his parents. That would also be a kind of transmission. The ten million Yen is the essential teaching (body), and the certificate attesting that he has received it is the theoretical teaching (shadow). The difference between essential and theoretical is like day and night. This is also stated in the Daishonin’s writing, “The One Hundred and Six Comparisons.”

    The Mystic Law which Shakyamuni received in the remote past when he was practicing the Bodhisattva Way at the level of hearing the name and the words of the truth is essential (the body), whereas Superior Practices and the others are theoretical (the shadow). The transmission of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra from beginningless time is the same as Nichiren’s present inheritance of the “Life Span” chapter.

    This is complex. In essence Nichiren Daishonin says that since time without beginning, he—as a common mortal at the stage of hearing the name and the words of the truth—has been upholding the true Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, that is, the body or the essential teaching. From that standpoint, the ceremony involving Superior Practices and the other bodhisattvas is the shadow, or the theoretical teaching. The sutra is a prophesy; it is documentary proof authorizing the Daishonin to carry out widespread propagation of the Mystic Law.

    The Nam-myoho-renge-kyo Thus Come One reflected on the canvas of the twenty-eight chapter Lotus Sutra manifests both as Shakyamuni who attained enlightenment in the remote past (the world of Buddhahood) and as Bodhisattva Superior Practices (the nine worlds). We must never forget that the Mystic Law is the “body,” and Bodhisattva Superior Practices is the “shadow.”

    (TO BE CONTINUED)
    Last edited by PassTheDoobie; 02-13-2013, 17:18.
    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    Comment


      #17
      The Wisdom of the Lotus Sutra, Volume five

      pgs. 168-170

      (SGI President Ikeda and Soka Gakkai study department leaders Katsuji Saito, Takanori Endo, and Haruo Suda explore the profound meaning of the Lotus Sutra based on Nichiren Daishonin's lecture on the Lotus Sutra, "The Record of the Orally Transmited Teachings.")


      THERE ARE NO BUDDHAS
      APART FROM HUMAN BEINGS


      Endo: So the ceremony of transmission boils down to a passing of the eternal Law from the world of Buddhahood to the nine worlds. But what is the significance?

      Ikeda: It indicates that the common mortal is a Buddha.

      The point I would like to stress is that we might speak of the Buddha as a “perfect being” possessing the thirty-two features, this is an ideal image that recedes the closer you get, as in the poem about utopia that I cited earlier.

      Although we might make assumptions about what a “perfect Buddha” is, in actuality this is nothing more than a target. In other words, there is no such thing as a Buddha living apart from the nine worlds of the ordinary person; an idealized Buddha possessing the thirty-two features simply does not exist. In reality, the Buddha can be found only in the life and activities of a bodhisattva. There is no Buddha other than the bodhisattva-Buddha.

      The effect resides within the cause. That is to say, the simultaneity of cause and effect is the true aspect of attaining Buddhahood. This is the reality of the original Buddha’s enlightenment; therefore, apart from this there is no attainment of Buddhahood. The Daishonin says: “Shakyamuni’s practices and the virtues he consequently attained are all contained within the five characters of Myoho-renge-kyo. If we believe in these five characters, we will naturally be granted the same benefits as he was” (WND, 365).

      Saito: What, then, is the reason for the description of perfect Buddhas possessing the thirty-two features? Is it simply to prompt people to practice, much as utopian ideals cause people to seek to advance humanity?

      Ikeda: It is to motivate people to persevere in Buddhist practice. Descriptions of Buddhas endowed with wonderful and grand attributes generate within people a yearning to know such beings, which subsequently inspire them to strive to attain Buddhahood themselves. Such images are meant to awaken within people the desire to advance and seek self-improvement.

      To say that the Buddha does not exist only means that ordinary people cannot see the Buddha with their own eyes. The world of Buddhahood is undeniably inherent in our lives; it just is not manifested anywhere but in the nine worlds.

      As the Great Teacher Dengyo of Japan says, “The bliss body of the Buddha, which is created by causes, represents the provisional result obtained in a dream, while the uncreated, eternally endowed three enlightened bodies represent the eternal true Buddha.”

      Suda: “Created” means that it is not inherent; it is something achieved that had not existed previously. The “bliss body of the Buddha” is a property of the Buddha achieved as a result of Buddhist practice. With the exception of the Buddha inherently endowed with the three enlightened properties, all Buddhas adorned with idealized features and characteristics are provisional Buddhas who symbolize the effects of Buddhist practice; they are but illusions.

      Endo: An actual Buddha is inherently endowed with the three enlightened properties; it is an eternally existing condition of life, not something attained as a result of countless aeons of practice.

      Saito: I have read this passage many times, but now I have en entirely fresh sense of its meaning.

      Ikeda: Majestic Buddhas are but illusions that have nothing to do with reality. The only actual Buddhas are ordinary people who each moment bring forth the eternal life force of time without beginning. There is no Buddha existing apart from the people. A Buddha set above the people is a fake, and expedient means. Therefore, the correct way is to live with dignity as a human being and to continue along the supreme path in life; to do so is to be a Buddha.

      This is what the Lotus Sutra teaches. The transmission to Bodhisattva Superior Practices in the “Supernatural Powers” chapter signifies such a transformation toward a Buddhism focused on the human being. As the Daishonin indicates when he says, “If you are of the same mind as Nichiren…..” we, who are endeavoring to spread the Mystic Law and thereby bring happiness to all humanity, are the Buddhas of the modern age. There are no others.

      For this reason, those who use the SGI members for their personal gain will without fail experience retribution for acting against the Law of the Buddha. On the other hand, to work for the welfare of SGI members and strive to see them become ultimately happy is to cause wonderful benefit to bloom in one’s life.

      (end of segment)
      Last edited by PassTheDoobie; 02-13-2013, 17:35.
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        #18
        Niceeee brothers new chanting Growers 3D

        Keep on chanting!!!

        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo! Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!
        My soul smells of Canapa!

        sigpic

        Comment


          #19
          Thank you Thomas! I love reading your posts!

          When we work for kosen-rufu and we stand up with the resolve to demonstrate the victory of faith, our lives overflow with benefit beyond belief.
          Nam Myoho Renge Kyo!

          This is TRUE!

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Payaso View Post
            Thank you Thomas! I love reading your posts!



            Nam Myoho Renge Kyo!

            This is TRUE!
            Yes me too... is always a pleasure!
            Thx Thomas
            Nam Myoho Renge Kyo!
            My soul smells of Canapa!

            sigpic

            Comment


              #21
              "All your efforts for kosen-rufu will become your good fortune. There will definitely come a time when you experience this for yourself. That’s why it’s important to exert yourselves energetically for the sake of Buddhism and the happiness of others."

              SGI Newsletter No. 8703, The New Human Revolution––Vol. 26: Chap. 1, Atsuta 37, translated 16th Jan, 2013
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                #22
                "Misfortune comes from one's mouth and ruins one, but fortune comes from one's heart and makes one worthy of respect."

                (New Year's Gosho - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 1137) Selection source: Kyo no Hosshin, Seikyo Shimbun, January 24th, 2013
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  #23
                  You, my dear friends who are struggling to look for employment
                  on the battlefield of severe financial conditions,
                  no matter what, never be defeated, never give in!
                  With sincerity and perseverance
                  we can all open up a victorious path towards our respective missions in life!


                  Daisaku Ikeda
                  Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                  Comment


                    #24
                    "The great life-state of the Buddha, of the Bodhisattvas of the Earth, pulses in the determination to dedicate one’s life to kosen-rufu."

                    SGI Newsletter No. 8667, The New Human Revolution––Volume 26: Chapter 1, Atsuta 18, translated 12th Nov. 2012
                    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Our practice is the force for attaining absolute victory.
                      There is not a single wall or obstacle
                      that cannot be overcome through our faith!
                      Let's make a fresh departure
                      towards the highest pinnacle of life and of kosen rufu,
                      starting first of all with invincible daimoku!


                      Daisaku Ikeda
                      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                      Comment


                        #26
                        "More valuable than treasures in a storehouse are the treasures of the body, and the treasures of the heart are the most valuable of all. From the time you read this letter on, strive to accumulate the treasures of the heart!"

                        (The Three Kinds of Treasure- The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 851) Selection source: Kyo no Hosshin, Seikyo Shimbun, May 23rd, 2012
                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                        Comment


                          #27
                          "In the words of the Armenian poet Avetik Isahakyan (1875–1957): 'Maintain your dignity and pride, whatever happens.'[1]

                          "Self-confidence is the backbone of the human spirit. People with self-confidence are strong. As long as one has confidence, one won’t be defeated by the harshest adversity."


                          SGI Newsletter No. 8519, The New Human Revolution––Vol. 25: Chap. 2, Shared Struggle 59, translated 17th May, 2012

                          [1] Translated from Russian. Avetik Isahakyan, Stikhotvoreniya i poemyi (Verses and Poems) (Leningrad: Sovetskii Pisatelj, 1975), p. 119.
                          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                          Comment


                            #28
                            We are in the season again of sudden and dramatic fluctuations in the weather. Let's keep a close tab on our health and remind our friends as well to take the necessary steps to avoid catching a cold or any other sickness. Together, let's advance, keeping "our good health" as our top priority!

                            Daisaku Ikeda
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              #29
                              "If one lights a fire for others, one will brighten one's own way."

                              (On the Three Virtues of Food - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Volume 2, page 1060) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, February 1st, 2013
                              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                              Comment


                                #30
                                So much to study! Wow, thank you so much for transcribing this most amazing dailogue! Sensei, Mr. Endo, Mr. Saito, and Mr. Suda contributed to such deep amazingly rich study for us! Here is a snippet of what I'm focusing on:

                                Ikeda: Yes, time without beginning is another name for life that is without beginning or end. It pertains, not to the doctrine of time, but to the doctrine of life.

                                The truth in the depths of life, the very life of the universe that continues to function ceaselessly, is referred to by the term time without beginning. This can also be called the “Thus Come One originally endowed with the three enlightened properties.”

                                Regarding the term “time without beginning” which in Japanese is kuon ganjo, the Daishonin says, “Kuon means neither created or adorned but remaining in one’s original state” (OTT, 141). “Not created” means inherently endowed; it does not indicate a specific point in time. “Not adorned” means not possessing the thirty-two features and eighty characteristics; it refers to ordinary people just as they are. “Remaining in one’s original state” means eternally existing.

                                Kuon signifies Nam-myoho-renge-kyo; it signifies the Gohonzon. When we pray to the Gohonzon, that very instant is beginningless time. For us, each day is beginningless time. Each day we can cause the supreme, pure, eternal life of time without beginning to well forth from our entire being. Each day we start anew from time without beginning, the starting point of life.


                                I'm going through these last two pages because herein lies the definition of our practice, this is what got me going in the original thread 7 years ago. Let's all attain Buddhahood in this lifetime! I'm sooo diggity down with thissss!

                                Thank you T for taking the time out for this!
                                Click This Link and let's chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread....e-kyo&page=355

                                https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread....3819&page=1593 --best thread off all the threads throughout this universe.

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