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  • Payaso
    replied
    Please visit this link to the NEW Chanting Grower's Group here on ICMag.com...

    And thank you for chanting along with us ~ Nam Myoho Renge Kyo!

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  • Skip
    replied
    Thanks to everyone for this amazing thread!
    We have to close it now because it's too long.
    Please start a new Chanting thread.

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "I am praying that, no matter how troubled the times may become, the Lotus Sutra and the ten demon daughters will protect all of you, praying as earnestly as though to produce fire from damp wood, or to obtain water from parched ground."

    (On Rebuking Slander of the Law and Eradicating Sins - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 444) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, April 13th, 2011

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    Let us use our hope-filled, encouraging voices
    to encourage and cheer up our friends
    who may be going through tough times.
    Let us have a smile on our faces that radiates a warm caring concern.
    It is in the very midst of trying circumstances
    that we need to be like a revitalising spring breeze.


    Daisaku Ikeda

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "...one member commented: 'I find it difficult to put into practice the eloquence, wisdom, and compassion that the guidance of the SGI suggests we aspire to.' In response, I said:

    "Just be yourself. All you have to do is keep chanting sincere daimoku and advance freely in a manner that is true to yourself. That is what is meant by the Buddhist principle of 'revealing one's true and highest potential.' The practice of Nichiren Daishonin's Buddhism allows one's true self to shine forth....Surely the true and most humane way for us to live is to advance just as we are, as ordinary people, basing our lives on Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and striving to improve ourselves even if little by little. Buddhism is the great Law that is open to all people; it does not make irrational or unreasonable demands."


    SGI Newsletter No. 8203, OUR BRILLIANT PATH TO VICTORY, The Great Light of the Westward Transmission of Buddhism--Part 2 [of 2], from the February 19th, 2011, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated April 6th, 2011

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "I entrust you with the propagation of Buddhism in your province. It is stated that 'the seeds of Buddhahood sprout as a result of conditions, and for this reason they preach the single vehicle.'"

    (The Properties of Rice - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, page 1117) Selection Source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shinbun September 15th, 2012

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    The Daishonin encourages us,
    "Strengthen your faith day by day and month after month."*
    Each day is a chance to make a new start.
    Each day is a chance to challenge things.
    Let's build a history in our lives of never ending victory!


    Daisaku Ikeda

    *"On Persecutions Befalling the Sage" - WND-I, page 997

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "Words of conviction backed by personal experience have the power to dispel the dark clouds of suffering obscuring a friend’s life."

    SGI Newsletter No. 8613, The New Human Revolution––Vol. 25: Chap. 4, Bastion of Capable People 20, translated 12th Sep. 2012

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    Let's give our newly joined members
    all the warm heartfelt encouragement we can!
    To study and take action together with them
    is the very best way to help them develop and grow.
    Let's do our utmost to look after each member with sincere care and concern.


    Daisaku Ikeda

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "What matters from the Buddha’s perspective is whether one practises in accord with his teachings. The Daishonin underscores this point when he refers to 'preaching the Lotus Sutra exactly as the Buddha did' (WND-1, 799), and '[acting] in exact accord with what the sutra teaches' (cf. WND-1, 799). He goes on to state that he is 'delighted' to have read the sutra with his life by encountering great difficulties in the course of propagating the Mystic Law.

    "The joy of reading the sutra with one’s life—of putting its teachings into practice—is the joy of working to actualise the Buddha’s wish to lead all people to enlightenment. It is the joy of striving 'exactly as the Buddha did'—of carrying on the same struggle as the Buddha, as his emissary. There is no greater joy in life than practising the supreme teaching of Buddhism and enabling those around us to reveal their Buddha nature.

    "For us, as members of the SGI, this is the joy of promoting kosen-rufu. Fulfilling our mission as Bodhisattvas of the Earth by creating happiness for ourselves and others through dialogue is a source of incomparable joy.

    "Through the example of his own struggles, the Daishonin taught Tokimitsu the joy of propagating the Mystic Law. In other letters to his young disciple, we see him writing: 'If people try to hinder your faith, I urge you strongly to feel joy' (WND-2, 566), and 'Though others may slander us [Nichiren and his followers], we are teachers of the Law who take no heed of such a thing' (WND-2, 501).

    "The important thing is what we do, not what others think. Everything depends on our own actions based on the Daishonin’s Buddhism. In our youth, we tend to be overly concerned about what others think about us, but what really matters is how we live our lives. Mr. Toda often said: 'You should seek to win favour with the Daishonin.'"[1]


    [1] Translated from Japanese. Josei Toda, “Seinen-kun” (Guidelines for Youth), in Toda Josei Zenshu (Collected Writings of Josei Toda), (Tokyo: Seikyo Shimbunsha, 1981), vol. 1, p. 61.

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "In the same way, the Buddha dwells within our hearts. For example, flint has the potential to produce fire, and gems have intrinsic value. We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts."

    (New Year's Gosho - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 1137) Selection source: SGI President Ikeda's message, Seikyo Shimbun, February 10th, 2013

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  • easyDaimoku
    replied
    Excerpt on Point One from Chapter 16 (of the OTT) translated by Burton Watson

    "The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The title of this chapter deals with an important matter that concerns Nichiren himself. This is the transmission described in the "Supernatureal Powers" chapter. The Thus Come One is Shakymuni Buddha or, more generally speaking, all the Buddhas of the ten directions and the three existences. Or, more specifically, it refers to the Buddha of the original state who is eternally endowed with the three bodies.

    Now it is the understanding of Nichiren and his followers that, generall speaking, the term "Thus Come One" refers to all living beings. More specifically, it refers to the disciples and law supporters of Nichiren.

    This being the case, the term "eternally endowed with three bodies" refers to the votaries of the Lotus Sutra in the Latter Day of the Law.

    The title of honor for one who is eternally endowed with the three bodies is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. This is what the three great concerns of actuality*[indicates the Three Great Secret Laws of Nichiren's teaching, that is, the object of devotion (honzon), the invocation (daimoku) of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, and the sanctuary (kaidan).] of the "Life Span" chapter refer to.

    Speaking in terms of the six stages of practice, the Thus Come One in this chapter is an ordinary mortal who is in the first stage, that of being a Buddha in theory. When one reverently accepts Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, one is in the next stage, that of hearing the name and words of truth. That is, one has for the first time heard the daimoku. When, having heard the daimoku, one proceeds to put it into practice, this is the third stage, that perception and action. In this stage one perceives the object of devotion that embodies the three thousand realms in a single moment of life. When one succeeds in overcoming various obstacles of illusions, this is the fourth stage, that of resemblance to englightment. When one sets out to convert others, this is the fifth stage, that of progressive awakening. And when one comes at last to the realization that one is a Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies, then one is a Buddha of the sixth and highest stage, that of ultimate enlightenment.

    Speaking of the chapter as a whole, the idea of gradually overcoming illusions is not the ultimate meaning of the "Life Span" chapter. You should understand that the ultimate meaning of this chapter is that oridinary mortals, just as they are in their original state of being, are Buddhas."

    (The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings {Soka Gakkai} Translated by Burton Watson pgs 123-124)

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  • easyDaimoku
    replied
    Originally posted by PassTheDoobie View Post
    Happy New Year EVERYONE!!!!
    Happy New Year over here to over there! Thank you! Good fortune, Good Health and Good times to all my beloved and most admired Bodhisattvas of the Earth (and your families)!

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "Today there are people who have faith in the Lotus Sutra. The belief of some is like fire while that of others is like water. When the former listen to the teachings, their passion flares up like fire, but as time goes on, they tend to discard their faith. To have faith like water means to believe continuously without ever regressing."

    (The Two Kinds of Faith - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 899) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, October 10th, 2011

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  • PassTheDoobie
    replied
    "My mentor, second Soka Gakkai president Josei Toda, often used to say: 'Approach life with confidence and courage!'

    "When someone was ill, he would repeatedly encourage them with warm care and concern. Sometimes his guidance could be strict and emphatic, because remaining steadfast in aith as a practitioner of the Daishonin's Buddhism is so vital when waging a life-and-death struggle against illness. He would say: 'Don't let anything shake you. Just chant with your whole life. Never lose heart! Activate the positive forces of the universe!'"


    SGI Newsletter No. 8347, Learning from the Writings of Nichiren Daishonin: The Teachings for Victory, [31] 'The Good Medicine for All Ills.' Turning All Adversity into an Impetus for Unceasing Progress, from the August 2011 issue of the Daibyakurenge, translated Oct. 5th, 2011

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