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    One should not be intimidated by the fact that so many hold such beliefs. Nor
    does the truth of a belief depend on whether it has been held for a long or
    short time. The point is simply whether or not it conforms with the text of the
    scriptures and with reason.


    (WND, 168-69)
    The Tripitaka Master Shan-wu-wei
    Written to Joken-bo and Gijo-bo in 1270
    SoCal

    Comment


      "This word 'belief' is a sharp sword that cuts off fundamental darkness or ignorance."

      (Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 725, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 54) Selection source: "Suntetsu", Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 22nd, 2010
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        "To dedicate ourselves to the cause of kosen-rufu is to carry out the work of the Buddha. These efforts infuse our entire beings with the power of the Mystic Law. We cannot help but experience the 'greatest of all joys' (cf. OTT, 212)."

        SGI Newsletter No. 7915, Creating a Precious Record of Our Life in This World, from the February 2010 issue of Daibyakurenge, translated Jan. 19th, 2010
        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

        Comment


          "The third volume of the Lotus Sutra states, 'Although the devil and the devil's people will be there, they will all protect the Law of the Buddha.'"

          (Letter to the Lay Priest Domyo - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 750) Selection source: SGI President Ikeda's speech, Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 23rd, 2010
          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

          Comment


            "The pride and courage of a life dedicated to truth and justice, and the unwavering hope and persistence to achieve victory--these are the greatest intangible treasures that we can pass on to our successors through the examples of our own lives."

            SGI Newsletter No. 7815, Dialogues with World Citizens, Dr. Mohamed El Baradei—Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), from the June 16, 2009, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated July 9th, 2009
            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

            Comment


              The Six-Volume Writings
              [六巻抄] (Jpn Rokkan-sho )


              A work by Nichikan, the twenty-sixth chief priest of Taiseki-ji temple and scholar of Nichiren's teachings, completed in 1725. During the four hundred years after Nichiren's death, various interpretations of his teachings were adopted by different Nichiren schools, and Nichikan held that the true meaning of Nichiren's teachings had become obscured. He wrote this work to refute what he felt were serious misconceptions and to clarify the true meaning of Nichiren's teachings. As the title indicates, it is a collection of six treatises:

              (1) "The Threefold Secret Teaching," which explains the teaching for the Latter Day of the Law by interpreting the meaning of the passage from The Opening of the Eyes, one of Nichiren's major works, that reads, "The doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life is found in only one place, hidden in the depths of the 'Life Span' chapter of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra" (224). Nichikan thus established the concept of the threefold secret teaching, or threefold comparison: first, the "doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life," which Nichiren himself identified as Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, is found in the Lotus Sutra and not in any of the other sutras; second, it is found in the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter of the essential teaching (latter half) of the Lotus Sutra and not in its theoretical teaching (first half); and third, it is found in the depths of the "Life Span" chapter. "Secret" in this context indicates that the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo hidden in the depths of the "Life Span" chapter had been kept secret, or remained hidden, until it was revealed by Nichiren.

              (2) "The Meanings Hidden in the Depths," which clarifies that the teaching hidden in the depths of the "Life Span" chapter is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo of the Three Great Secret Laws. It discusses the Three Great Secret Laws in detail.

              (3) "Interpreting the Text Based upon Its Essential Meaning," which interprets important passages of the Lotus Sutra from the standpoint of the teaching of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo of the Three Great Secret Laws.

              (4) "The Teaching for the Latter Day," which sets forth the correct object of devotion to be established in the Latter Day of the Law. This treatise explains why the object of devotion inscribed by Nichiren, rather than an image of Shakyamuni Buddha, is the correct object of faith in the Latter Day of the Law. This treatise also indicates that the correct practice of reading and reciting the Lotus Sutra in the Latter Day of the Law is to read and recite its two key chapters, "Expedient Means" (sec-ond) and "Life Span," and not the entire sutra.

              (5) "The Practices of This School," which explains that correct practice in the Latter Day of the Law consists of two kinds: primary and sup-porting. The primary practice is the chanting of the daimoku, or the invocation of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, and the supporting practice is the reading and recitation of the "Expedient Means" and "Life Span" chapters. This work explains why these two chapters are recited in daily practice. It also defines the three treasures in the Latter Day of the Law and describes the great benefits of chanting the daimoku.

              (6) "The Three Robes of This School," which defines the "three robes" as the traditional gray robe, the white surplice, and the prayer beads of the priests of the Fuji school, and explains their significance.
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                threefold secret teaching
                [三重秘伝] (Jpn sanju-hiden )


                A doctrine Nichikan (1665-1726), the twenty-sixth chief priest of Taiseki-ji temple, established based on the passage in Nichiren's treatise The Opening of the Eyes that reads: "The doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life is found in only one place, hidden in the depths of the 'Life Span' chapter of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra. Nagarjuna and Vasubandhu were aware of it but did not bring it forth into the light. T'ient'ai Chihche alone embraced it and kept it ever in mind" (224). Nichikan interpreted this sentence to mean that the doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life is found (1) only in the Lotus Sutra, not in any other sutra; (2) only in the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter of the essential teaching (latter half), not in the theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra; and (3) only in the "depths," not on the "surface," of the "Life Span" chapter. The first point corresponds to the comparison of the true teaching (the Lotus Sutra) and the provisional teachings (all the other sutras). The second point corresponds to the comparison of the essential teaching and the theoretical teaching of the Lotus Sutra. The third point corresponds to the comparison of the "depths" and the "surface" of the "Life Span" chapter of the sutra, the former indicating the Buddhism of sowing, and the latter, the Buddhism of the harvest. These three levels of comparison reveal the ultimate teaching of Nichiren, or the Buddhism of sowing, as being Nam-myoho-renge-kyo of the Three Great Secret Laws. Nichikan used the term "threefold secret teaching" because the Buddhism of sowing, hidden threefold in the depths of the "Life Span" chapter, was unknown to the other Nichiren schools.
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  Buddhism of the harvest
                  [脱益仏法] ( Jpn datchaku-buppo )


                  The Buddhism directed toward the salvation of those who received the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives through the practice of Buddhism in their past existences. The process by which the Buddha leads people to enlightenment may be divided into three stages called sowing, maturing, and harvesting. This process is described in the Lotus Sutra. Shakyamuni first planted the seeds of enlightenment in the lives of his disciples at the time of his original enlightenment numberless major world system dust particle kalpas in the past, as expounded in the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter, and then nurtured the seeds through his preaching as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence at a time major world system dust particle kalpas in the past, as related in the "Parable of the Phantom City" (seventh) chapter. He continued nourishing the seeds in his lifetime in India through the provisional teachings he expounded during the forty-two years after his enlightenment under the bodhi tree as well as through the theoretical teaching (first fourteen chapters) of the Lotus Sutra. Finally he brought his disciples to full enlightenment with the essential teaching (latter fourteen chapters) of the sutra, particularly the "Life Span" chapter. Therefore the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra is called the Buddhism of the harvest. In contrast, Nichiren's teaching is called the Buddhism of sowing because it implants the seeds of Buddhahood, i.e., Nam-myoho-rengekyo, in the lives of the people of the Latter Day of the Law, who had not received the seeds in the past. See also Buddhism of sowing.
                  Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                  Comment


                    Buddhism of sowing
                    [下種仏法] ( Jpn geshu-buppo )


                    The Buddhism that plants the seeds of Buddhahood, or the cause for attaining Buddhahood, in people's lives. In Nichiren's teachings, the Buddhism of sowing indicates the Buddhism of Nichiren, in contrast with that of Shakyamuni, which is called the Buddhism of the harvest. The Buddhism of the harvest is that which can lead to enlightenment only those who received the seeds of Buddhahood by practicing the Buddha's teaching in previous lifetimes. In contrast, the Buddhism of sowing implants the seeds of Buddhahood, or Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, in the lives of those who had no connection with the Buddha's teaching in their past existences, i.e., the people of the Latter Day of the Law. See also sowing, maturing, and harvesting; teacher of the true cause.
                    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                    Comment


                      sowing, maturing, and harvesting
                      [種熟脱] (Jpn shu-juku-datsu )


                      The three-phase process by which a Buddha leads people to Buddhahood. In The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra, T'ient'ai (538-597) set forth this concept based on the Lotus Sutra, comparing the process of people attaining Buddhahood to the growth of a plant. In the first stage, "sowing," the Buddha plants the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of the people, just as a gardener sows seeds in the soil. Nichiren (1222- 1282) states in The Essentials for Attaining Buddhahood, "The Buddha [is] like the sower, and the people like the field" (WND/748). In the second stage, the Buddha nurtures the seeds he has planted by helping the people practice the teaching and leading them gradually to Buddhahood. This stage is compared to the gardener's care for the sprouting and growth of a plant and is called "maturing." In the third and final stage, the Buddha leads the people to reap the harvest of enlightenment, enabling them to attain Buddhahood. This is comparable to the gardener reaping the fruit of a plant and is called "harvesting." The process of sowing, maturing, and harvesting is described as taking place over countless kalpas. From the viewpoint of the essential teaching (latter half) of the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni first planted the seeds of enlightenment in the lives of his disciples numberless major world system dust particle kalpas in the past. He then nurtured them as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence major world system dust particle kalpas in the past and later as the Buddha in India by preaching the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra. He finally brought them to fruition, or enlightenment, with the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra. Seen from this perspective, Shakyamuni's essential teaching was expounded for the purpose of reaping the harvest of enlightenment and accordingly is called the teaching of the harvest. The pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching, through which Shakyamuni nurtured his disciples' capacity for enlightenment, are regarded as the teaching of maturing. As a whole, Nichiren refers to Shakyamuni's teachings as the Buddhism of the harvest. In The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind, Nichiren states: "He [Shakyamuni] planted the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives in the remote past [numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and nurtured the seeds through his preaching as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence [major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and through the first four flavors of teachings [the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings] and the theoretical teaching in this life. Then with the essential teaching he brought his followers to the stage of near-perfect enlightenment and finally to that of perfect enlightenment" (WND/369-70). In the same work, Nichiren writes: "The essential teaching of Shakyamuni's lifetime and that revealed at the beginning of the Latter Day are both pure and perfect [in that both lead directly to Buddhahood]. Shakyamuni's, however, is the Buddhism of the harvest, and this is the Buddhism of sowing. The core of his teaching is one chapter and two halves, and the core of mine is the five characters of the daimoku alone" (WND/370). Though "one chapter and two halves" indicates that Shakyamuni planted the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of his followers, the teaching of sowing is "hidden in the depths of the 'Life Span' chapter" of the Lotus Sutra. More specifically, it is hidden in the sentence "Originally I practiced the bodhisattva way." Nichiren referred to the hidden teaching as "the seed of Buddhahood, that is, the three thousand realms in a single moment of life" in The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind (WND/365). In The Opening of the Eyes, he writes: "This is the doctrine of original cause and original effect. It reveals that the nine worlds are all present in beginningless Buddhahood and that Buddhahood is inherent in the beginningless nine worlds. This is the true mutual possession of the Ten Worlds, the true hundred worlds and thousand factors, the true three thousand realms in a single moment of life" (WND/235). This indicates the eternal Mystic Law that enables people to reveal Buddhahood from their beginningless nine worlds. Originally Shakyamuni practiced the bodhisattva way as a common mortal with this Law as his teacher and thus realized and manifested his inherent Buddhahood. In contrast with Shakyamuni's Buddhism, Nichiren identified his teaching as the Buddhism of sowing and defined the daimoku of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as the teaching for planting the seeds of enlightenment. Because Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the law of the simultaneity of cause and effect, it contains within it all three stages of sowing, maturing, and harvesting. The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra refers to two types of people: those who [received the seeds of Buddhahood and] have good roots and those who do not. According to Nichiren, people in the Latter Day of the Law never received the seeds of Buddhahood from the Buddha in the past and must therefore first receive the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives. Then they can complete the whole process of maturing and harvesting in this lifetime. Nichiren established the object of devotion called the Gohonzon, embodying in it the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as a means for people to plant the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives and reap the fruit of Buddhahood. In Nichiren's teaching, the practice for doing so involves chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon. See also teacher of the true cause; teacher of the true effect.
                      Last edited by PassTheDoobie; 01-28-2010, 14:50.
                      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                      Comment


                        teacher of the true effect
                        [本果妙の教主] (Jpn honga-myo-no-kyoshu )


                        In Nichiren's teachings, Shakyamuni Buddha. In the "Life Span" (six-teenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni reveals the true effect, the Buddhahood he attained numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago. He alludes to the cause of that enlightenment only with the words "Originally I practiced the bodhisattva way," and does not clarify the teaching or Law that he practiced to attain Buddhahood. Shakyamuni Buddha is called the teacher of the true effect because he revealed his original enlightenment as a result already achieved—as an effect—and did not specify its cause. Nichiren defined the true cause that enabled Shakyamuni and all other Buddhas to attain enlightenment as the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo; he is therefore called the teacher of the true cause.
                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                        Comment


                          teacher of the true cause
                          [本因妙の教主] (Jpn honnin-myo-no-kyoshu )


                          In Nichiren's teachings, the Buddha who expounds the fundamental Law, or the true cause, that enables all people to attain Buddhahood. In the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni reveals the true effect, or the Buddhahood that he attained numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago. He does not, however, fully clarify the true cause of, i.e., the practice that led to, his enlightenment. Hence, he is called the teacher of the true effect. In contrast, Nichiren taught that Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the Law implicit in the "Life Span" chapter and is the cause of enlightenment for all people. Because he clarified the true cause for attaining Buddhahood, he is called the teacher of the true cause, and his Buddhism, the Buddhism of the true cause, or the Buddhism of sowing that implants the seeds of enlightenment in the lives of those who practice it.
                          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                          Comment


                            Three Great Secret Laws
                            [三大秘法] (Jpn sandai-hiho )


                            The core principles of Nichiren's teaching. They are the object of devotion of the essential teaching, the daimoku of the essential teaching, and the sanctuary of the essential teaching. Here, "essential teaching" refers to the teaching of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and not to the essential teaching, or the latter fourteen chapters, of the Lotus Sutra. Nichiren (1222-1282) established these three essential principles to enable people in the Latter Day of the Law to attain Buddhahood. They are called secret because they are implicit in the text of the "Life Span" (sixteenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra and remained hidden or unknown until Nichiren revealed them. Nichiren regarded them as the vital teaching that Shakyamuni Buddha transferred to Bodhisattva Superior Practices in the "Supernatural Powers" (twenty-first) chapter of the sutra. He regarded his mission as one with that of Bodhisattva Superior Practices. The Three Great Secret Laws represent Nichiren's embodiment of the Mystic Law, to which he was enlightened, in a form that all people can practice and thereby gain access to that Law within their own lives. He associated the Three Great Secret Laws with the three types of learning set forth in Buddhism—precepts, meditation, and wisdom. Specifically, the object of devotion corresponds to meditation, the sanctuary to precepts, and the daimoku to wisdom. Concerning the three types of learning based on the Lotus Sutra, Dengyo(767-822), in his Questions and Answers on Regulations for Students of the Tendai Lotus School, states, "The spacelike immovable precept, the spacelike immovable meditation, and the spacelike immovable wisdom—these three all together are transmitted under the name 'Wonderful Law.'" The three types of learning based on the Lotus Sutra are called "spacelike" and "immovable" because, like space, which represents the ultimate truth, they are immovable, or imperturbable. Nikko, Nichiren's successor, stated that in Nichiren's teachings the object of devotion corresponds to the spacelike immovable meditation, the sanctuary to the spacelike immovable precept, and the daimoku to the spacelike immovable wisdom. Nichiren mentions the Three Great Secret Laws in several of his writings (all dated after his near execution at Tatsunokuchi and subsequent exile to Sado Island in 1271), and in a work known as On the Three Great Secret Laws, he offers a detailed definition. At the core of the Three Great Secret Laws is the One Great Secret Law. This is the object of devotion of the essential teaching, or Nichiren's embodiment in the form of a mandala of the eternal Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, which he fully realized and manifested in his life. He writes in The Person and the Law, "Deep in this mortal flesh I preserve the ultimate secret Law inherited from Shakyamuni Buddha, the lord of teachings, at Eagle Peak" (1097). Because embracing this object of devotion called the Gohonzon is the only precept in Nichiren's teaching, the place where it is enshrined corresponds to the place where one vows to observe the Buddhist precepts—the ordination platform, or sanctuary, of the essential teaching. The term precept in Buddhism implies preventing error and putting an end to evil. The daimoku of the essential teaching indicates the invocation or chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the object of devotion; it includes chanting the daimoku for oneself and teaching it to others. Thus, both the sanctuary and the daimoku derive from the object of devotion. Later Nichikan (1665-1726), the twenty-sixth chief priest of Taiseki-ji temple, classified the Three Great Secret Laws into Six Great Secret Laws. First, the object of devotion is viewed in terms of both Person and Law. The Person indicates Nichiren himself, who achieved the enlightenment and virtues of the eternal Buddha and who established the Buddhism of sowing for all people in the Latter Day of the Law. The object of devotion in terms of the Law is the Gohonzon, which embodies Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. Second, the sanctuary also has two aspects, the specified sanctuary and the general sanctuary. The former is the sanctuary to be built at the time of kosen-rufu, or wide propagation, in accordance with Nichiren's instruction. This is the place where the object of devotion Nichiren inscribed for all humanity (commonly known as the Dai-Gohonzon) is to be enshrined when his teaching has been widely spread and established. The general sanctuary is any place where one enshrines the object of devotion and engages in practice. Third, the daimoku of the essential teaching also has two aspects: the daimoku of faith and the daimoku of practice. The former means to believe in the Gohonzon, and the latter means to chant the daimoku and spread it. According to Nichikan's "Interpreting the Text Based upon Its Essential Meaning," the Six Great Secret Laws are considered a crystallization of the Buddha's eighty-four thousand teachings, the Three Great Secret Laws a crystallization of the Six Great Secret Laws, and the One Great Secret Law a crystallization of the Three Great Secret Laws.
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              "Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life, and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, no matter what happens."

                              (Happiness in This World - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 681) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, January 28th, 2010.
                              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                              Comment


                                "We chant the most powerful and supreme rhythm of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. There is nothing stronger. Chanting is the key to absolute victory. We will never be defeated. When we practise as the Daishonin teaches, boundless energy and courage surge forth from the depths of our beings.

                                "Let’s win and open the way forwards in all spheres, day after day and year after year, living in rhythm with the Mystic Law and making the entire universe our ally."


                                SGI Newsletter No. 7919, 36th SOKA GAKKAI HEADQUARTERS LEADERS MEETING--PART 2 [OF 2] Making the Entire Universe Our Ally (At the 36th Soka Gakkai Headquarters Leaders Meeting, held in conjunction with the Nationwide Women's Division Group Leaders General Meeting, at Makiguchi Memorial Hall in Hachioji, Tokyo, on Jan. 9th, 2010, from the Jan. 19th, 2010, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated Jan. 25th, 2010.
                                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

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