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    Buddhism is about winning!

    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    Comment


      Originally posted by PassTheDoobie View Post
      "Buddhism primarily concerns itself with victory or defeat."

      (The Hero of the World - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 835) Selection source: SGI President Ikeda's speech, Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 10th, 2010
      That's exactly what Nichiren teaches, Easy!

      Thank you Wilson!

      Dear Sister DG, it is I who expresses appreciation to YOU for never giving up! Friends from another lifetime! Never say never and I do pray for Velma!

      As I pray for all of you! Be safe and be well! Chant Daimoku!

      Much love and deepest respect,

      Thomas
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        "In life, it is important to enjoy our challenges. Every effort requires hard work and entails difficulties of one sort or another, the key is not to rue difficulties but to enjoy them as challenges. That's the secret to opening the way to happiness. You can't exercise your full abilities if you're only motivated by a sense of obligation. Those who find joy in life's challenges and do their best with a positive, eager attitude are unbeatable."

        SGI Newsletter No. 7910, The New Human Revolution--Vol. 23: Chap. 1, The Future 19, translated Jan. 12th, 2010
        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

        Comment


          "It is extremely rare to be born as a human being. Not only are you endowed with human form, but you have had the rare fortune to encounter Buddhism. Moreover, out of the Buddha's many teachings you have encountered the daimoku, or the title, of the Lotus Sutra and become its votary."

          (Letter to Jakunichi-bo - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 993) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 14th, 2010
          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

          Comment


            "To treasure each person--this is truly the foundation of Nichiren Daishonin's Buddhism. As the saying goes, 'One is the mother of ten thousand' (WND-1, 131). The enlightenment of one person opens the way for all people to attain enlightenment. The Daishonin states: 'When the dragon king's daughter attained Buddhahood, it opened up the way to attaining Buddhahood for all women of later ages' (WND-1, 269). This is a case of 'one example that stands for all the rest' (WND-1, 269).

            "Wholeheartedly encouraging each individual member we encounter, therefore, will serve to invigorate the entire organisation. As long as open, one-on-one dialogue is fostered. our organisation will continue to flourish. This means giving confidence to those feeling lost and confused, hope to those burdened with worries, courage to those sunk in despair, joy to those filled with sorrow, wisdom to those beset by hardships, staying power to those facing setbacks, peace of mind to those gripped by fear, and conviction to those stalled by uncertainty. Such a steady stream of encouragement becomes a powerful source of revitalisation. It fosters bonds of joint commitment, of working together for a common cause. Through these supportive efforts, we actually take a step closer to happiness for both ourselves and others."


            SGI Newsletter No. 7908, LEARNING FROM THE WRITINGS OF NICHIREN DAISHONIN: THE TEACHINGS FOR VICTORY, [11] "The Three Kinds of Treasure"--Part 2 [of 3], "Treasuring Each Person"--The Guiding Spirit of Our Actions as Genuine Practitioners of Nichiren Daishonin's Buddhism, from the November 2009 issue of the Daibyakurenge, translated Jan. 8th, 2010
            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

            Comment


              "Moreover, even though one may encounter a wise teacher and the true sutra and thereby embrace the correct teaching, when one resolves to break free from the sufferings of birth and death and attain Buddhahood, one will inevitably encounter seven grave matters known as the three obstacles and four devils, just as surely as a shadow follows the body and clouds accompany rain."

              (Letter to Misawa - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 894) Selection source: Soka Gakkai President Harada's encouragement, Seikyo Shimbun, January 15th, 2010
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                "Those who strive for the welfare of others, even while struggling with their own personal difficulties, will achieve greatness. This is a lesson we must never forget.

                "In contrast, those who avoid making effort and care only about their own ease and comfort won't achieve greatness. Those who struggle hard and win amid poverty, amid adversity, faraway from the limelight, are the ones who ultimately become truly great human beings."


                SGI Newsletter No. 7911, 35th SOKA GAKKAI HEADQUARTERS LEADERS MEETING--PART 1 [OF 2] Embodying the Lofty Spirit of Goethe, from the Dec. 21st, 2009, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated Jan. 13th, 2010
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  Originally posted by PassTheDoobie View Post
                  "Those who strive for the welfare of others, even while struggling with their own personal difficulties, will achieve greatness. This is a lesson we must never forget.

                  "In contrast, those who avoid making effort and care only about their own ease and comfort won't achieve greatness. Those who struggle hard and win amid poverty, amid adversity, faraway from the limelight, are the ones who ultimately become truly great human beings."


                  SGI Newsletter No. 7911, 35th SOKA GAKKAI HEADQUARTERS LEADERS MEETING--PART 1 [OF 2] Embodying the Lofty Spirit of Goethe, from the Dec. 21st, 2009, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated Jan. 13th, 2010

                  It seems truer words have never been spoken!

                  Nam Myoho Renge Kyo!

                  Comment


                    "The capacity to improvise in response to circumstances is crucial, not only in education, but in all matters. It is difficult to make progress based on a paint-by-numbers approach. Adapting to conditions is critical; adaptability is the product of wisdom and a sense of responsibility."

                    SGI Newsletter No. 7913, The New Human Revolution--Vol. 23: Chap. 1, The Future 23, translated Jan. 15th, 2010
                    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                    Comment


                      "The first shi of the word shishi, or 'lion' [which means 'teacher'], is the Wonderful Law that is passed on by the teacher. The second shi [which means 'child'] is the Wonderful Law as it is received by the disciples. The 'roar' is the sound of the teacher and disciples chanting in unison. The verb sa, 'to make' or 'to roar,' should here be understood to mean to initiate or to put forth. It refers to the initiating of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in the Latter Day of the Law.

                      (Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 748, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 111) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, January 16th, 2010
                      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                      Comment


                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo
                        [南無妙法蓮華経] Nam-myoho-renge-kyo


                        The ultimate Law or truth of the universe, according to Nichiren's teaching. Nichiren first taught the invocation of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo to a small group of people at Seicho-ji temple in his native province of Awa, Japan, on the twenty-eighth day of the fourth month in 1253. It literally means devotion to Myoho-renge-kyo. Myoho-renge-kyo is the Japanese title of the Lotus Sutra, which Nichiren regards as the sutra's essence, and appending nam (a phonetic change of namu ) to that phrase indicates devotion to the title and essence of the Lotus Sutra. Nichiren identifies it with the universal Law or principle implicit in the meaning of the sutra's text. The meaning of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is explained in the opening section of The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, the record of Nichiren's lectures on the Lotus Sutra compiled by his disciple and successor, Nikko. It states that namu derives from the Sanskrit word namas and is translated as devotion, or as "dedicating one's life." What one should dedicate one's life to, he says, are the Person and the Law. The Person signifies "Shakyamuni," which means the eternal Buddha, and the Law is "the Lotus Sutra," which means the ultimate truth, or Myoho-renge-kyo. According to Orally Transmitted Teachings, the act of devotion (namu) has two aspects: One is to devote oneself to, or fuse one's life with, the eternal and unchanging truth; the other is that, through this fusion of one's life with the ultimate truth, one simultaneously draws forth inexhaustible wisdom that functions in accordance with changing circumstances. Orally Transmitted Teachings further states: "We may also note that the nam of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is a Sanskrit word, while Myoho-renge-kyo are Chinese words. Sanskrit and Chinese join in a single moment to form Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. If we express the title [of the Lotus Sutra] in Sanskrit, it will be Saddharma-pundarika-sutra. This is Myoho-renge-kyo. Sad (a phonetic change of sat ) means myo, or wonderful. Dharma means ho, Law or phenomena. Pundarika means renge, or lotus blossom. Sutra means kyo, or sutra. The nine Chinese characters [that represent the Sanskrit title] are the Buddha bodies of the nine honored ones. This expresses the idea that the nine worlds are none other than the Buddha world." Myo stands for the Dharma nature, or enlightenment, while ho represents darkness, or ignorance. Together as myoho, they express the idea that ignorance and the Dharma nature are a single entity, or one in essence. Renge stands for the two elements of cause and effect. Cause and effect are also a single entity." Kyo represents the words and voices of all living beings. A commentary says, 'The voice carries out the work of the Buddha, and it is called kyo.' Kyo may also be defined as that which is constant and unchanging in the three existences of past, present, and future. The Dharma realm is myoho, the wonderful Law; the Dharma realm is renge, the lotus blossom; the Dharma realm is kyo, the sutra." As Nichiren states, namu derives from Sanskrit, and Myoho-renge-kyo comes from Chinese. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is, therefore, not simply a Japanese phrase, but a Japanese reading of a Sanskrit and Chinese phrase. In this sense, it contains aspects of the languages of three countries in which Mahayana Buddhism spread. According to Nichiren's treatise The Entity of the Mystic Law, Nan-yeh and T'ient'ai of China and Dengyo of Japan recited the invocation meaning devotion to the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law, or Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, as their private practice, but they did not spread this practice to others. In On the Three Great Secret Laws, Nichiren states that the daimoku Nichiren chants today in the Latter Day of the Law is different from that of the previous ages—the daimoku T'ient'ai and others chanted in the Former Day and Middle Day of the Law—because the practice of daimoku in the Latter Day of the Law involves chanting it oneself and teaching others to do so as well. Nichiren not only established the invocation (daimoku) of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo but embodied it as a mandala, making it the object of devotion called Gohonzon. In Reply to Kyo'o, he states, "I, Nichiren, have inscribed my life in sumi ink, so believe in the Gohonzon with your whole heart. The Buddha's will is the Lotus Sutra, but the soul of Nichiren is nothing other than Nam-myoho-renge-kyo" (WND/412).
                        Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                        Comment


                          "This passage refers to the great joy that one experiences when one understands for the first time that one's mind from the very beginning has been the Buddha. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the greatest of all joys."

                          (Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 788, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 211) Selection source: Living Buddhism, Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 17th, 2010
                          Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                          Comment


                            "Iron, when heated in the flames and pounded, becomes a fine sword. Worthies and sages are tested by abuse."

                            (Letter from Sado - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol.1, page 303) Selection source: SGI President Ikeda's speech, Seikyo Shimbun, June 21st, 2009
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              "Shakyamuni Buddha was a person who initiated conversations. He didn't arrogantly wait for others to greet him, but was always the first to greet others in a bright, friendly manner, which made others open their hearts to him. He was never in the least bit haughty or self-important. This kind of warm, humanistic behaviour is the starting point of Buddhism as a living philosophy."

                              SGI Newsletter No. 7798, Bringing People Together through Dialogue, from the July 2009 issue of Daibyakurenge, translated June 18th, 2009
                              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                              Comment


                                "The Daishonin writes: 'Iron, when heated in the flames and pounded, becomes a fine sword. Worthies and sages are tested by abuse' (WND-1, 303). Iron is tempered by fire to become steel, which can then be forged into a magnificent sword. The same is true of people. It is actually to our advantage to undergo hardship and struggles in life."

                                SGI Newsletter No. 7803, 30TH SOKA GAKKAI HEADQUARTERS LEADERS MEETING--PART 1 [OF 2] Maintain a Youthful Spirit, from the June 21st, 2009, issue of the Seikyo Shimbun, translated June 25th, 2009
                                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

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