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    "The sutra's statement, 'Those persons who had heard the Law dwelled here and there in various Buddha lands, constantly reborn in company with their teachers,' cannot be false in any way."

    (The Heritage of the Ultimate Law of Life - The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, page 217) Selection source: "Kyo no Hosshin", Seikyo Shimbun, January 15th, 2007
    Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

    Comment


      "A truly good friend is someone with the compassion and courage to tell us even those things we would prefer not to hear, which we must confront if we are to develop and grow in our lives."

      [ from "Good Friends" Courtesy of the January 2004 SGI Quarterly ]
      Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

      Comment


        Hav'nt had a drink for 8 years, Wooooooooooo Hoooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!

        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

        Once again, welcome!

        peace

        bonz





        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
        Bonzo BoUnCeS back...

        FREEDOM for BONZ

        "When one objectively acknowledges, accepts, and embraces one's weaknesses; they in fact, no longer continue to be that."(PTD)

        Comment


          T, is your radar on? You never fail to amaze me brother!!!!

          peace and love

          bonz






          >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
          Bonzo BoUnCeS back...

          FREEDOM for BONZ

          "When one objectively acknowledges, accepts, and embraces one's weaknesses; they in fact, no longer continue to be that."(PTD)

          Comment


            hello friends

            I think i have alot of reading and catching up to do.

            I wish to share an experience i had last night.

            after reading through bonzos thread, allways seeing "Nam myoho renge kyo"
            my curiousity got the better, so i googled and i must say WoW i was intrigued, fascinated even. now ive never been a holy man or the like and i belive people of faith to be somewhat brainwashed, but this concept (even what little i currently know about) of Nam myoho renge kyo just makes sense...

            I found myself chanting whenever i had the chance, choping onions.taking the bins out.bathing my children...couldnt stop..my wife and kids joined in lol. I had the best sleep i can remember,as did my wife..there was a positive energy that i could sense, something thats been missing. strange?? hell yes good??? VERY..

            I hate books, never liked them, first chance i get im going to get some related books.i want to read,learn, grow to be a better person,as a family person,father,husband,workmate ,stranger passing by.. whoa pretty heavy..
            im feeling a positive ORE like im recharged... this is bizare. i like it

            any ideas where to start T and friends? (books) will take me some time to read this whole thread. hehe 360 pages

            thank you bonzo i think you just changed my life hehe..

            Comment


              Eulogy! Welcome! Try starting here (considering where you live):

              SGIA is a lay Buddhist organisation committed to the promotion of Peace, Culture and Education based on Nichiren Daishonin's Buddhism. Soka Gakkai means Value-Creating Society. Through their Buddhist faith and practice, our members aim to improve their lives by taking up the challenge to create value and take responsibility for their circumstances. Aiming to live without fear, caring for their families and living with compassion for others leads to their greater individual happiness and a more peaceful society. SGI Australia is one of the constituent organizations of Soka Gakkai International (SGI).

              at this link:

              http://www.sgiaust.org.au/

              More as you seek it,

              Thomas
              Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

              Comment


                Contact SGIA

                Local Areas

                National & NSW Centre
                3 Parkview Drive
                Homebush Bay
                New South Wales 2127
                Australia.
                Phone: (02) 9763 2283
                Fax: (02) 9763 2686
                Email: admin@sgiaust.org.au

                Queensland Centre
                90 Waldheim Street
                Annerley 4103
                Phone: (07) 3391 2027
                Fax: (07) 3393 0916

                Victorian Centre
                12 Ripon Grove
                Elsternwick
                Vic 3185
                Phone: (03) 9523 7669
                Fax: (03) 9523 8280


                Adelaide
                Please contact Victorian Centre

                Canberra
                Please contact National & NSW Centre

                Coffs Harbour
                Please contact National & NSW Centre

                Darwin
                Please contact Queensland Centre

                Newcastle
                Please contact National & NSW Centre

                Western Australia
                Please contact National & NSW Centre

                Woollongong
                Please contact National & NSW Centre

                Tasmania
                Please contact Victorian Centre
                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                Comment


                  Dialogue in Buddhism

                  We are clearly living in a period of profound historical transition. As many point out, more positive forms of human interaction and dialogue must be developed if we are to bring out the creative possibilities of this era. What can Buddhism contribute to building a new culture of dialogue?

                  The word dialogue comes from the Greek dia--through--logos, a word that includes the meanings of language, principle, rationality, law, etc. Dialogue in Buddhism is not merely a vehicle or means for communicating its message. Rather, the practice of dialogue expresses a central tenet of Buddhism--faith in human beings, in their limitless dignity and potential as possessors and embodiments of universal truth. In the Buddhist tradition, dialogue--open and respect-based human interaction--has played a central part in the quest to discover and identify common or universal values that would allow human beings to live in the best, most humane and empowering ways.

                  Today the idea of "universal values" is often viewed with suspicion, if not open hostility, as code and cover for one culture imposing itself on another. But a belief in the existence of common human values need not contradict belief in a particular cultural and religious perspective.

                  If we examine the lives of all of humanity's great religious and philosophical teachers, we find that they have all been masters of the art of dialogue. At the same time, they are without exception people of firm, seemingly unshakable faith. This suggests that strongly-held convictions are not necessarily an impediment to dialogue; rather, they may be the critical condition for its success.

                  The sutras, which record the teachings of the Buddha, reveal Shakyamuni as a teacher who spent his adult life traveling from one place to another, interacting with people, striving to offer the means of living with confidence and hope in the face of life's inevitable sufferings. The people he encountered were diverse in terms of their level of education, their social and economic backgrounds, and their capacity to grasp the full implications of his teachings. Thus, he engaged in a fluid and organically unfolding style of dialogue through which he sought to awaken people to the dharma--the enduring and universal truth within. And he sought to share with others his profound confidence in their ability to embody and act on that truth in order to realize lives of genuine happiness.

                  Nichiren, the 13th-century Japanese Buddhist reformer whose teachings inspire the SGI, was himself a master of dialogue. Many of his important works, including those in which he remonstrated with the government, are written in dialogue form. Perhaps his most important treatise, On Establishing the Correct Teaching for the Peace of the Land (Rissho ankoku ron), unfolds as a dialogue between two individuals, the host and the guest, whose views are quite at odds, but who find a common ground in their shared concern for the plight of a society wracked by warfare and natural disaster. The host tells the guest, "I have been brooding alone upon this matter, indignant in my heart, but now that you have come, we can lament together. Let us discuss the question at length." The dialogue develops as the two exchange views on the causes and possible responses to the dire situation confronting society; it concludes with the two vowing to work together toward a common goal.

                  Dialogue has been central to the SGI since its inception. From the earliest years in the 1930s in Japan, small group discussions have been the key venue for study and practice. One-on-one dialogue and encouragement rooted in a sense of mutual respect and human equality have also played a central role.

                  As SGI President Ikeda has stated: "The conquest of our own prejudicial thinking, our own attachment to difference, is the guiding principle of open dialogue, the essential condition for the establishment of peace and universal respect for human rights."

                  Humanism is a key concept within the SGI, which often describes its philosophical basis as "Buddhist humanism." Dialogue is a process through which we uncover and reveal our human grandeur. Dialogue withers when our hearts are closed to the infinite possibilities of the other and we assume we already know all we need to know about them. Dialogue flourishes when it is conducted in an open-minded spirit of discovery based on compassion, on the desire to build on what we have in common and transform our differences into rich sources of value.


                  [ Courtesy January 2007 SGI Quarterly ]
                  Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                  Comment


                    Eulogy!!!!!!!!!! WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! WELCOME!!!!!!! So good to see you here!!!!! Im at a loss for words!!!!

                    WOW! Congradulations to you!! You have found something very special here, not to mention some of the most incredible people ive/you will ever met!!!!

                    Including of course the thread starter and most awesome host. Bodhisattva of the Earth, Pass The Doobie or T for short, i see hes got ya all hooked up with centers and all the right connections youll need to get started. WOOOOOOOOOOOO HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!

                    I feel so incredibly good for you right now Eulogy!!!! again im a bit speechless....wow!

                    ill be back!

                    peace and

                    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Nam myoho renge kyo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                    bonz.......................... ..............wow!!!!!!!!!!!!! !
                    Last edited by Bonzo; 01-23-2007, 02:50.
                    Bonzo BoUnCeS back...

                    FREEDOM for BONZ

                    "When one objectively acknowledges, accepts, and embraces one's weaknesses; they in fact, no longer continue to be that."(PTD)

                    Comment


                      Nam Myoho Renge Kyo
                      (Medical Patient In Compliance)

                      Nam myoho renge kyo !! Mugi wasshin
                      your bud
                      babba

                      Peace/ Be here now

                      Babba's Farm L.L.C.


                      The political views, or conspiracy theories, of icmag ownership, do not reflect my own views and are sole property of the participants

                      Comment


                        Sorry for my lack of post lately. Been working on my sons house and battling some physical ailments keepin me a bit on the slow moving side and definetly feeling the pressure to keep this vehicle running a bit longer much love to you all
                        Nam Myoho Renge Kyo
                        (Medical Patient In Compliance)

                        Nam myoho renge kyo !! Mugi wasshin
                        your bud
                        babba

                        Peace/ Be here now

                        Babba's Farm L.L.C.


                        The political views, or conspiracy theories, of icmag ownership, do not reflect my own views and are sole property of the participants

                        Comment


                          ive been missing you as of late babba , hope all the physical ailments are just temperary.. your sons a lucky guy to have you work on his home with him ,, lots of love going into it im sure ,, nam myoho renge kyo ,, peace and love to everyone
                          my lemon smelling beast from h3ad seeds

                          whole lot of bogglegums

                          big time indica lover

                          NAM MYOHO RENGE KYO !!

                          Comment


                            A wisteria vine, by twining around a pine, may climb a thousand fathoms into the air; and a crane, because it has wings to rely upon, can travel ten thousand ri. It is not their own strength that allows them to do these things. This applies likewise in the case of the priest Jibu-bo. Though he himself is like the wisteria vine, because he clings to the pine that is the Lotus Sutra, he is able to ascend the mountain of perfect enlightenment.

                            [ On Offerings for Deceased Ancestors, WND Page 820 ]
                            Nam-myoho-renge-kyo!

                            Comment


                              eulogy--
                              i just read your post and i have to say it brought a great smile to my face . i think this is just wonderfull.. its all abought being positive , being the best person you can be . what a wonderfull thing to happen to you and your familey .
                              my lemon smelling beast from h3ad seeds

                              whole lot of bogglegums

                              big time indica lover

                              NAM MYOHO RENGE KYO !!

                              Comment


                                Nam Myoho Renge Kyo

                                Akaasa
                                So glad to see you have made it to our beutiful thread. I say on this issue that you should perhaps read a bit further into Nichiren Daishonin Buddihism and you will see we are in the latter day of the law. A rather long explanation but a beautiful read. Im sure that all our friends here will bare with us for this beautiful read and perhaps it will inspire you Akaasa to read more of Nichiren Daishonin's teachings.
                                ----------------------------------------------------------------

                                Immeasurable Meanings Derive From the One Law

                                Niji seson. Ju sanmai. Anjo ni ki. Go sharihotsu. Sho-but^chi-e. Jinjin muryo. Go chi-e mon. Nange nannyu. Issai sho-mon. Hyaku-shi-butsu. Sho fu no chi.

                                At that time the World-Honored One calmly arose from his samadhi and addressed Shariputra, saying: "The wisdom of the Buddhas is infinitely profound and immeasurable. The door to this wisdom is difficult to understand and difficult to enter. Not one of the voice-hearers or pratyekabuddhas is able to comprehend it....

                                At the outset of the "Hoben" chapter, Shakyamuni arises serenely from samadhi and begins expounding the teaching of the Lotus Sutra. Samadhi, or meditative concentration, means to focus one's mind on one point so that it becomes perfectly tranquil and still like a clear mirror, and thereby enter a state of inner serenity. Shakyamuni enters samadhi early in the "Introduction," the first chapter of the sutra, and continues meditating throughout the chapter.

                                Even though the sutra speaks of Shakyamuni entering samadhi, or meditative concentration, this does not mean that in the Latter Day of the Law people should seclude themselves in mountains and forests and practice sitting meditation or contemplation. Nichiren Daishonin, who struggled in the very midst of society to enable all people to attain supreme enlightenment, rejects such practices as not suited to the time.

                                Needless to say, in the present age samadhi or "meditative concentration" means doing gongyo and chanting daimoku. We do not, however, carry out this practice of "meditative concentration" secluded in mountains and forests. Rather, on the foundation of our practice of gongyo and daimoku, each day we polish our lives, draw forth infinite wisdom and courage, and go out into society. This is the discipline we are carrying out.

                                Contemplation or meditation for its own sake is absurd. In the Vimalakirti Sutra, Shakyamuni clearly explains that true meditation is not solitary contemplation beneath a tree but playing an active role in society while embracing the truth.

                                Mahatma Gandhi, to someone who urged that he pursue a life of meditation, is said to have remarked that he felt no need to withdraw to a cave for that purpose. He carried the cave with him, he said, wherever he went. This episode is characteristic of Gandhi, who devoted his life to taking action and practicing among the people.

                                Buddhism is not a religion that closes its eyes to people's suffering; it is a teaching that opens people's eyes. Therefore, Buddhism is the path that enables people to become happy. To turn away our eyes from the contradictions of society and rid ourselves of all worldly thoughts is not the way of Buddhist practice.

                                The true spirit of meditation lies in manifesting our innate wisdom in society and resolutely struggling for the happiness of ourselves and others, and to construct a better society.

                                The Daishonin Stood Up for All Humankind

                                The specific type of samadhi Shakyamuni entered is termed "meditation on the truth that immeasurable meanings derive from the one Law." This Law from which immeasurable meanings derive is the foundation of all teachings. Thus the Muryogi Sutra reads, "Immeasurable meanings are born from a single Law." Shakyamuni expounded the Lotus Sutra from the standpoint of this great truth to which he had become enlightened.

                                Nichiren Daishonin clarified that this "single Law" is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. He revealed this fundamental Law of the universe for all people and expressed it so that anyone can practice it. He expounded it for the sake of the entire world and for all humanity.

                                Nichiren Daishonin stood up to expound the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo for the happiness of all people. This is what the phrase "calmly arose from his samadhi" signifies in terms of its implicit meaning.

                                In practical terms from our own standpoint, the phrase "immeasurable meanings are born from a single Law" means precisely that by believing in and embracing the Mystic Law, we can acquire the Buddha's infinite wisdom. By doing gongyo and chanting daimoku, we cause our lives to shine with supreme wisdom and advance along the path of genuine victory in life. Each day, we are able to make a vigorous departure from life's prime point.

                                Therefore, please be confident that SGI members who pray with the determination, "I will fight again today," "I will do my best tomorrow, too" and who stand up for kosen-rufu in society are themselves practicing the phrase "calmly arising from samadhi" each morning and evening.

                                The 'Unsolicited and Spontaneous Teaching'

                                Shakyamuni, having arisen from samadhi, spontaneously begins to expound the Lotus Sutra without anyone first requesting him to do so. This manner of preaching, where the Buddha expounds the Law on his own initiative without any question having been put to him, is termed the "unsolicited and spontaneous teaching."

                                The doctrine Shakyamuni spontaneously and serenely begins to expound is so profound that his disciples could not have imagined it, let alone have asked him to teach it. In this, we see the outpouring of wisdom and compassion that impelled Shakyamuni to expound the Lotus Sutra.

                                It is of profound significance that Shakyamuni employs the "unsolicited and spontaneous teaching" format as he begins to expound the Lotus Sutra. All sutras other than the Lotus are provisional teachings expounded "according to others' minds" (Jpn. zuitai), that is, according to the capacity of his listeners; and as such do not represent the Buddha's true intention. By contrast, the Lotus Sutra is described as "according with [the Buddha's] own mind" (Jpn. zuijii), because in this sutra Shakyamuni reveals the truth directly, in accordance with his own enlightenment.

                                The Daishonin's declaration of the establishment of the Buddhism of the Latter Day of the Law is another instance of "unsolicited and spontaneous teaching." With regard to establishing his teaching, the Daishonin says: "If I speak out, I am fully aware that I will have to contend with the three obstacles and the four devils" (MW-2, 113). He knew, in other words, that if he spread the Mystic Law, he was certain to encounter persecution.

                                Nonetheless, without being asked by anyone, he began to expound the teaching of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. In his struggles throughout his lifetime, the Daishonin was carrying out the practice of zuijii.

                                In terms of our own practice, zuijii indicates the spontaneous spirit to praise the Mystic Law out of profound recognition of its greatness, no matter what anyone might say. Such admiration for the Mystic Law is the essential reason that we recite the sutra during gongyo.

                                Zuijii also indicates the attitude of "propagating the Law to the full extent of one's ability," the irrepressible desire to teach and explain to others even a single word or phrase. By contrast, if you talk about the Mystic Law because you have been told to do so, or in the belief that it will make others think highly of you, then you are following the practice of zuitai, or acting "according to others' minds."

                                Broadly speaking, "the unsolicited and spontaneous teaching" and the practice of zuijii indicate autonomous and self-motivated action. It does not matter if your words are plain, or if you are not a talented speaker; what is important is to pray earnestly with the determination for others to become happy and to tell others candidly about the greatness of Buddhism --- with conviction and in your own words. This is the spirit of the Lotus Sutra, and the spirit of the Soka Gakkai.

                                The Buddha Seeks To Enable All People To Attain the Same Enlightened State of Life

                                Shakyamuni starts out by telling Shariputra: "The wisdom of the Buddhas is infinitely profound and immeasurable. The door to this wisdom is difficult to understand and difficult to enter. Not one of the voice-hearers or pratyekabuddhas is able to comprehend it." This statement extols the great wisdom of the Buddha.

                                The "wisdom of the Buddhas" is the wisdom that shines like a sun within the Buddha. Shakyamuni praises this wisdom as being "infinitely profound and immeasurable." He calls the Buddha's wisdom "infinitely profound" because it penetrates down to the truth that is the very foundation of life. The Buddha's wisdom is said to be "immeasurable" because its light broadly illuminates all things.

                                The wisdom of the Buddhas profoundly and broadly illuminates and reveals life in its entirety. Therefore, the Buddha's state of life is said to be "expansive and profound." Likening the Buddha's state of life to a great tree or a mighty river, T'ien-t'ai says: "The deeper the roots, the more prolific the branches. The farther the source, the longer the stream" (MW-4, 272).

                                Shakyamuni is not praising the wisdom of the Buddhas to say that the Buddha alone is great. In fact, it is just the opposite; his purpose is to encourage others. In effect, he is saying: "Therefore, all of you, too, should make this same great wisdom of the Buddha shine in your own lives and become happy."

                                Wisdom is the path to happiness. Money, skill at "getting by" in the world, status --- none of these can enable us to overcome the fundamental sufferings of birth, old age, sickness and death. The only way is to cultivate the wisdom with which our lives are inherently endowed.

                                The purpose of the Lotus Sutra is to enable all people to cultivate supreme wisdom in their hearts and advance along the great path of indestructible happiness. The Daishonin says, "The treasures of the heart are the most valuable of all" (MW-2, 279). That is why Shakyamuni starts out by extolling the wisdom of the Buddhas, which is the supreme wisdom.

                                The next passage reads, "The door to this wisdom is difficult to understand and difficult to enter." Here Shakyamuni again praises the wisdom of the Buddhas, but from a slightly different perspective.

                                The "door to this wisdom" is the door to the realm of Buddha wisdom. The various teachings Shakyamuni expounded were means for enabling people to enter the realm of this wisdom.

                                Prior to the Lotus Sutra, he had expounded various teachings in accordance with the diverse capacities of his listeners. At different times, for example, he taught that life is suffering; that nothing is constant; that happiness lies in extinguishing all desires; and that people should seek to awaken to the principle of dependent origination.

                                In this way, Shakyamuni, exercising the wisdom of the Buddha, expounded teachings that matched the various capacities of the people. However, these individual teachings did not represent the Buddha's true purpose. The purpose of his teaching, rather, lay in enabling all people to enter the path of wisdom, the path for becoming a Buddha.

                                This purpose of the Buddha cannot be understood by the wisdom of people of the two vehicles of Learning (voice-hearers) and Realization (pratyekabuddhas). Even though such people may understand the contents of his teaching, they cannot fathom his reason for expounding it.

                                Their very satisfaction with individual teachings that explained life's impermanence or the need to eradicate desires prevented them from entering the realm of the wisdom of the Buddha who had expounded these doctrines. They reached the gate, as it were, and then stopped. Therefore, Shakyamuni says this wisdom is "difficult to understand and difficult to enter."

                                Regard Suffering and Joy as Facts of Life

                                In the foregoing, I have discussed the literal or surface meaning of this passage. President Toda explained this passage from the standpoint of its implicit meaning as follows: "The line, 'The wisdom of the Buddhas is infinitely profound and immeasurable' means that the wisdom of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is infinitely profound and immeasurable. The passage, 'The door to this wisdom is difficult to understand and difficult to enter,' refers to the 'door of faith' in the Gohonzon. By substituting faith for wisdom, we can enter the 'door to this wisdom.' This door is 'difficult to understand and difficult to enter.'"

                                As the Daishonin indicates where he says, "'Wisdom' means Nam-myoho-renge-kyo" (Gosho Zenshu, p. 725), Nam-myoho-renge-kyo contains the infinitely profound and immeasurable wisdom of the Buddhas in its entirety. And the door to enter the wisdom of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the "door of faith." Thus the Daishonin says, "'Door' means faith" (Ibid., p. 715).

                                If we believe in the Gohonzon and exert ourselves in practice and study as the Daishonin teaches, then, in accordance with the principle of "substituting faith for wisdom" we can develop a state of life of supreme happiness. This is what it means to enter the "door of faith," to advance along the path of attaining Buddhahood in this lifetime.

                                However, carrying through with faith becomes difficult when we encounter waves of adversity in life. At such times, people may forget that faith is the "door of wisdom." Instead, filled with complaint, they are tossed about helplessly on the rough seas. Or again, they may fear suffering and give themselves over to lives of pleasure and ease. In this sense, as well, the "door of faith" is difficult to understand and difficult to enter.

                                For precisely this reason, the Daishonin says, "Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo" (MW-1, 161).

                                Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the wellspring of the wisdom of all Buddhas. And gongyo is a "ceremony of kuon ganjo" in which we return to the very foundation of our lives and draw wisdom from the great ocean of the world of Buddhahood.
                                (Medical Patient In Compliance)

                                Nam myoho renge kyo !! Mugi wasshin
                                your bud
                                babba

                                Peace/ Be here now

                                Babba's Farm L.L.C.


                                The political views, or conspiracy theories, of icmag ownership, do not reflect my own views and are sole property of the participants

                                Comment

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