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    Sativa v Indica

    I'm not sure when these titles were assigned to distinguished Cannabis types. These terms became increasingly utilized leading up to legalization because, hey, it's cool to acknowledge straight forward surface level information about topics you hold casual interest in, right? The average consumer loves 2 party categorizations. It gives them choice.

    From an objective perspective, and relative only to each other, these are the known associations of "Sativa" and "Indica":

    Sativa is a fiber varietal by nature. Indica being a drug varietal. This is seen in the gendered characteristics of the plant; masculine, vegative growth of the equitorial varieties, and feminine, reproductive focus of the Middle Eastern varieties.


    "Sativa" masculine, vegetation focused
    Long narrow leaf
    Long internode
    Expansion
    Small roots
    Non-uniform bud
    Auxin dominant
    Driven by:nitrate, potassium, calcium, chloride
    Associations:Oxidation, Acidic, Heat

    "Indica" feminine, bloom focused
    Short wide leaf
    Short internode
    Larger roots
    Uniform bud
    Contraction
    Cytokinin dominant
    Driven by: ammonium, phosphorus , manganese
    Associations: Reduction, Basic, Cold



    How do masculine/feminine traits influence the cannabinoids/effects?

    Honestly I don't think it's any more complicated than this: What we smoked in the 70s can be recreated today by simply harvesting hybrids extremely early. The anxiety complaint does not originate from pure cannabis, but from tainted cannabis via feeding methods. If you've never grown Cannabis without nutrients, you owe yourself the insight as to why this plant was grown for thousands of years [without fertilizer] with no regard for profit.

    We didn't know what ripe, plump flower was in the 70s, because Sativa lacked the hormonal power for bloom, evidenced by lengthy flower times. Today we see multiple techniques employeed claiming to speed growth yet parallel known methods for increased senescence. I'm a small operation but even at my scale you can see the correlation between browning cannabis resin and short flowering. The commercial indica is over ripe, speed aged Cannabis, by all definitions. While the heavy body feeling of traditional indica varieties is a known characteristic, the groggy, sleepy substitute the commercial consumer experiences, a sad substitute for legitimate couch lock, is a degraded cannabis association.

    If my theory is correct, we should be able to reduce the flowering time of Sativa significantly through nutritional hormone steering without inducing premature senescence. I believe this was more commonly obtained in the 90s before information became clouded by disinfo agents intent on driving liquid supply sales. After thousands of years, we went from under ripe cannabis to over ripe cannabis in a matter of decades. The difference between Indica and Sativa as observed in the legal markets? Only the degraded Cannabis variety exists. 90s weed is peak Cannabis in theory and in practice.

    #2
    that sounds a bit strange now. but the reason why indica has a short flowering time and sativa a long flowering time is due to the leaves.

    while indicas are more dark green, sativas are lighter green. the reason are different levels of chlorophyll. with indica these are a lot higher in the leaf. these are high energy reserves that enable a fast flowering process.

    in reality it is only a geogravic adaptation of the plants to the prevailing environmental factors. if cannabis had been dragged from its region of origin, we would not have this discussion about ruderalis sativa indica ... there would be no reason to catalog different evolutionary advances in different varieties ... luckily this is not the case.

    compare the climatic regions, temperature and humidity over a cycle of one year ... the hours of sunshine that are available ... consider the different pests and the changed medium and nutrient base. if you compare all of this you will understand why the leaves look different, why the plant has different chemistry ... and thus have different terpenes and differently arranged cannabionide compositions.

    Cannabis belongs to the annual family, it hibernates in the seed. all geographic, climatic and nutrient situations of the medium are permanently stored in the seed. in this way, it can improve from generation to generation in the same location. and be a big surprise at a foreign location ... both positive and negative. if i grow a sativa with a long flowering time in my geographic location, it will not be ripe in time for the cold snap ... it lacks the experience. however, if I pollinate them very early, with luck I can harvest a few ripe seeds in autumn. if you repeat this process 3-4 times i guarantee that this sativa would be ready for me in time. it will also adapt itself optically. the long, narrow fingers which are shorter and wider in dry, hot climates. the light green will give way to a darker green ... it is the empirical values ​​on the environment.

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      #3
      Thought the various shades of green had to do with nitrogen availability.
      And adaptation in the form of leaf change etc are not a work of hormones?
      Environmet is triggering it, nay?
      Interesting theory. Maybe a bit esoteric
      Jackies lil' Tower of Horrors

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        #4
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          #5
          Originally posted by zaprjaques View Post
          Thought the various shades of green had to do with nitrogen availability.
          And adaptation in the form of leaf change etc are not a work of hormones?
          Environmet is triggering it, nay?
          Interesting theory. Maybe a bit esoteric
          I skipped your questions, sorry
          which part exactly sounds esoteric to you?

          the theory with the leaf colors is correct. The theory that nitrogen is green is long out of date, did it even exist?

          if you look at the chemical structure of chlorophyll a in particular, you will see that it only has a single bond. a central magnesium core to which 4 nitrogen are flush.
          if this nitrogen is missing, less chlorophyll a is produced but more carotenes, for example. another leaf color which enables the yellow, orange and red leaf colors.

          these leaf colors replace the missing chlorophyll a. you can see the lack of nitrogen in the fact that the plant stores more carotene in its leaves. you don't see the lack of nitrogen because the leaves are getting less, that's esoteric.

          wherever cannabis has developed long, slender fingers as a landrace, many hours of sunshine and the months with high temperatures are higher. there is no reason for them to store too many energy reserves in the form of chloropyll a in the leaves. the climate and the hours of sunshine look different for cannabis with leaves with broad fingers. A lot of bad weather, little sun, quickly low temperatures. that all of this has an effect on the hormone balance ... what do you think?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Growenhaft View Post

            I skipped your questions, sorry
            which part exactly sounds esoteric to you?

            the theory with the leaf colors is correct. The theory that nitrogen is green is long out of date, did it even exist?

            if you look at the chemical structure of chlorophyll a in particular, you will see that it only has a single bond. a central magnesium core to which 4 nitrogen are flush.
            if this nitrogen is missing, less chlorophyll a is produced but more carotenes, for example. another leaf color which enables the yellow, orange and red leaf colors.

            these leaf colors replace the missing chlorophyll a. you can see the lack of nitrogen in the fact that the plant stores more carotene in its leaves. you don't see the lack of nitrogen because the leaves are getting less, that's esoteric.

            wherever cannabis has developed long, slender fingers as a landrace, many hours of sunshine and the months with high temperatures are higher. there is no reason for them to store too many energy reserves in the form of chloropyll a in the leaves. the climate and the hours of sunshine look different for cannabis with leaves with broad fingers. A lot of bad weather, little sun, quickly low temperatures. that all of this has an effect on the hormone balance ... what do you think?
            My bad, i should have answered more explicitly. My reply wasnt solely ment as reaction to your post Growenhaft . Thanks for the lesson, i only have a very basic knowledge of the topic. To me it was the norm that less nitrogen in the soil will cause light green leaves.
            So it was not clear to me why 'sativas' should have lighter green leaves as standard configuration as i am currently growing a SE asian landrace (TRSC Manipuri) that reacted with dark green curled leaves to the soil i used that was obviously too rich in nitrogen. Maybe its the difference between organic and non organic growing in soil.. With non organic maybe i was forcing the nitrogen uptake, i dont know.

            What you are saying about hormonal balance and environmental effects on it i would agree 100%.

            To clear things up i was referring to Buttholocaust s theory as esoterical sounding. Sativa -> warm/male, Indica -> cold/female, etc.

            My personal belief is that theres no different classes, just a very broad genepool and a high plasticity in cannabis.

            I would like to think about the topic as i think of apples, i am aware that theres not much in common between the two species except the apple has also an immense genepool, thats why nobodys running apple trees from seed, and thats also the reason the appletree has adapted to many many regions of the globe.
            Last edited by zaprjaques; 07-05-2021, 11:34. Reason: mixed something up. sativa/warm indica/cold
            Jackies lil' Tower of Horrors

            Comment


              #7
              da ich derzeit eine südostasiatische Landrasse (TRSC Manipuri) anbaue, die mit dunkelgrünen, gekräuselten Blättern auf die von mir verwendete Erde reagiert, die offensichtlich zu reich an Nährstoffen war Stickstoff.
              Vielleicht ist es der Unterschied zwischen organischem und nicht-organischem Anbau im Boden..
              yes the cause is very likely the medium.
              when your landrace has got used to a nutrient-poor medium, then she has developed strategies to be able to dissolve and absorb nutrients better.
              this information is stored in genetics. now you come with a medium in which the nutrients are readily available.

              if you want to adapt your genetics to your environment, you should precisely under these circumstances reproduce the genetics in purity without crossbreeding. the second generation will be able to cope much better with the nutrient supply.

              or if you would like to get to know genetics in its original form, then you should copy the environment as closely as possible from the respective breeder who cultivated this landrace for indoor use. or if it was a purely outdoor plant, simulate this environment as close as possible in your interior. with shortened vegitation, of course.

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