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That skunky smell? Blame ‘321 MBT’ and not Terpenes

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  • troutman
    replied
    Originally posted by Cvh View Post
    troutman
    ​​​​​​​Ok, but that's not really answering my questions why you say that indoor gardens aren't capable of producing much thiols?
    Thiols are produced under anerobic conditions after hydrogen sulfide is produced by the reduction of sulfates and iron is present.
    This would be like under water like in swamp mud or deep soils with no oxygen. Unless you want to create a stinky swamp type
    aroma indoors which I'm sure your family won't be very impressed with don't go there. It's why I say it's easier and less trouble
    to do it outside.

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01809852

    Leave a comment:


  • Hashmasta-Kut
    replied
    But you aren't talking about herb that produces thiols. Most weed smell is from terpenes, and hardly any weed produces mercaptans that break down to thiol compounds. Your evidence is unrelated to skunk. Skunk smell does not come from the presence, or ample amount of sulfur.

    Leave a comment:


  • troutman
    replied
    Originally posted by Agronomist View Post

    Maybe you have less sulfur in your soil?
    Or less sulfur in your fertilizer.
    I live in area World known for acid rain. I live within eyesight of a mining smokestack.
    My outdoor soil is rich in sulfur at 24.4 mg/kg. I grew the same strain indoors and out.
    The outdoor plants smell stronger.

    Leave a comment:


  • troutman
    replied
    Originally posted by Hashmasta-Kut View Post

    Not true really. Skunk is extremely skunky indoors. Nothing to do with soil, only genetics.
    Not true really?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hashmasta-Kut
    replied
    Originally posted by Maple_Flail View Post

    from a brief glance with merely observational eyes, I would suspect there is an interaction that would be atleast tricky to replicate indoors consistently.

    seems to be a yeast/bacteria interaction with the sulfur in soil causing a break down product that once the plant ingests feeds the pathway to these thiols.
    It's not that, just drop the idea please.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hashmasta-Kut
    replied
    Originally posted by troutman View Post
    I don't think indoor gardens will produce much Thiols. Been doing RKS research for a while now.

    Outdoors is where it will happen if at all with the right genetics and soil components.

    3-methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol = Odor Description: Intense leek, onion-like, skunky.
    Not true really. Skunk is extremely skunky indoors. Nothing to do with soil, only genetics.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hashmasta-Kut
    replied
    Originally posted by Cvh View Post
    troutman
    Ok, but that's not really answering my questions why you say that indoor gardens aren't capable of producing much thiols?
    Most stuff has 0 thiols present. Skunk grown indoors stinks to high heaven, and no stinkier outdoors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maple_Flail
    replied
    Originally posted by Cvh View Post
    troutman
    Ok, but that's not really answering my questions why you say that indoor gardens aren't capable of producing much thiols?
    from a brief glance with merely observational eyes, I would suspect there is an interaction that would be atleast tricky to replicate indoors consistently.

    seems to be a yeast/bacteria interaction with the sulfur in soil causing a break down product that once the plant ingests feeds the pathway to these thiols.

    Leave a comment:


  • Agronomist
    replied
    Originally posted by Cvh View Post
    troutman
    Ok, but that's not really answering my questions why you say that indoor gardens aren't capable of producing much thiols?
    Maybe you have less sulfur in your soil?
    Or less sulfur in your fertilizer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cvh
    replied
    troutman
    ​​​​​​​Ok, but that's not really answering my questions why you say that indoor gardens aren't capable of producing much thiols?

    Leave a comment:


  • troutman
    replied
    Originally posted by Cvh View Post

    What's the reason that indoor gardens don't produce much thiols?

    I personally grow full organic in soil indoors that has amendments like Lava Meal,...etc. It's loaded with secondary (ie. sulfur and such) and micro nutrients, it's also teaming with good biological life.
    Do you think my plants -given the correct genetics- would produce thiols?

    Or are you referring to hydro grows which lack in the secondary macro and micro nutrients and don't contain any or not much rhizosphere life?

    What would be required for a plant to be able to produce Thiols?
    ​​​​​​
    Well for one thing. Thiols smell very strong and I don't think anyone will want
    to live with that aroma indoors. It would drive you mad or sick in no time.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiol

    The simplest thiol is methanethiol and it's toxic. You can smell it at 1 part per billion (ppb)
    and it's used to odorize natural gas and propane so you know there's a leak. If you had the
    thiol aroma indoors people may come looking for a gas leak.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanethiol

    Leave a comment:


  • Cvh
    replied
    Originally posted by troutman View Post
    I don't think indoor gardens will produce much Thiols. Been doing RKS research for a while now.

    Outdoors is where it will happen if at all with the right genetics and soil components.

    3-methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol = Odor Description: Intense leek, onion-like, skunky.
    What's the reason that indoor gardens don't produce much thiols?

    I personally grow full organic in soil indoors that has amendments like Lava Meal,...etc. It's loaded with secondary (ie. sulfur and such) and micro nutrients, it's also teaming with good biological life.
    Do you think my plants -given the correct genetics- would produce thiols?

    Or are you referring to hydro grows which lack in the secondary macro and micro nutrients and don't contain any or not much rhizosphere life?

    What would be required for a plant to be able to produce Thiols?
    ​​​​​​

    Leave a comment:


  • Hempy McNoodle
    replied
    The first time I ever smelled "marijuana" smoke was at a Black Sabbath concert in San Francisco when I was 11 years old. These dudes were sitting in the row in front of me and they were smoking up this big fucking cigar of pot. I remember the smell,.. straight up dog shit! What causes the dog shit smell? By the way, I used to get weed all the time in the 90s that smelled just like skunk and LOUD! It would smell up an area so bad!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hashmasta-Kut
    replied
    Thiol compounds, been saying this for years. Read it on a weed site about 7 years ago I'd reckon. I have experienced real skunky skunk first hand for decades and propane. Both stink like crazy, both have mercaptans that break down to thiol compounds.

    Leave a comment:


  • f-e
    replied
    There is a common smell, but it's not the main component in our greens smell. Usually I don't smell it at all, but the french onion leaf might be a good description, when it's on your hands, with a little 'old copper coin' in the mix.

    Leave a comment:

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