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    Seen Decembers Fluence Video?

    Has anybody seen the video released around the 15th of December? It's about trials with Wageningen University and Research (WUR) in the Netherlands and Austin-based Texas Original Compassionate Cultivation (TOCC) throughout 2019 and 2020.

    You can get it from Osram, but you have to apply for it. They ignored my attempts from a temporary email account. Someone must of watched it, with a screen grab?

    The outline was that more light made more weight, and if any part of the spectrum (lets say 660) had it's associated plant processes maxed out, then that was the limit of how much light you could apply. From another angle, they said if you were bleaching because of too much red, you could lower the red, then bang up up green and blue. The goal they were after, was maxing out all the spectrum at the same time. They used lights with 40 60 and 80% red, finding 40% could yield iirc 17% more than 60
    In the other study (in greenhouses) they kept to 480umol but played with colour. Lights tipped towards the red (they called them pink lights, so very red I guess) showed that while lower supplemental light intensity did not significantly influence cannabis yield, spectrum does still considerably alter cannabinoid and terpene concentrations. In some cultivars, increased red light significantly reduced cannabinoid and monoterpene content while concurrently increasing sesquiterpene content. The skunk flavour.

    Some of that was copied, so a little awkward in the delivery.


    I would really like to see the video to see just what they mean by pink lights, the amount of red, and how significant.

    #2
    Are you interested in the r4-r6-r8-r9b range, from Osram?
    then i sit down with you so that you don't sit around here alone, i would like to see the video too.
    now someone just has to come to start the evening at the cinema.

    on the page in the link you can see in the pictures that a very strong pink is produced by means of foils in the right greenhouse.
    a little further down a lamp which exudes a delicate pink.

    https://fluenceupdater.wpengine.com/physiospec-spectra/

    however, the video will be about something else ... so i'm really looking forward to it

    Comment


      #3
      They have some other seminars coming up https://fluence.science/events/

      Comment


        #4
        I signed up for the one yesterday then promptly forgot about it.. fkin stoner

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Growenhaft View Post
          Are you interested in the r4-r6-r8-r9b range, from Osram?
          then i sit down with you so that you don't sit around here alone, i would like to see the video too.
          now someone just has to come to start the evening at the cinema.

          on the page in the link you can see in the pictures that a very strong pink is produced by means of foils in the right greenhouse.
          a little further down a lamp which exudes a delicate pink.

          https://fluenceupdater.wpengine.com/physiospec-spectra/

          however, the video will be about something else ... so i'm really looking forward to it
          Good Link. I think it offers a few clues. The Pink is a warm Burple and they have a leaf over a VDU showing a spectrum with perhaps 40% red.

          A lot of these well conducted tests have different outcomes. The one thing that's not equal between them all, is the actual plant. It's nice when they use a few and tell us what they are. Without that knowledge (or even with it) test results can look very different. A more recent study found Sodium grows the most pot per photon, as all the light is at the warm end.
          The lowest fraction of blue photons was 4% from HPS, and increased to 9.8, 10.4, 16, and 20% from LEDs. There was a consistent, linear, 12% decrease in yield in each study as the fraction of blue photons increased from 4 to 20%. Dry flower yield ranged from 500 to 750 g m-2. This resulted in a photon conversion efficacy of 0.22 to 0.36 grams dry flower mass yield per mole of photons. Yield was higher at a PPFD of 900 than at 750 ╬╝mol m-2 s-1. There was no effect of spectral quality on CBD or THC concentration
          Of course they were keeping the ppfd the same, so while blue went up, red went down. They don't say what LED's either. I suspect Burple.

          Comment


            #6
            Oh.. They did talk LED's in the full paper. Enough to be it's own thread, not an edit.

            leds.jpg

            Looking at that for context in the Fluence story, 40% red is found here from 4/5000K + Red. I think it's 5000K White as the Blue has dropped ~25% and Red gained 25% when put beside the 5000K, with a telling lift in the Far Red. They chose LED's that kept the green constant. It has to be 5000K in the Red2 light.
            EDIT: The green is there isn't it, I wasn't looking. It's a 4000K white I think. It doesn't quite make sense to me yet.

            I chose 3000K+Red but often thought I should drop the Red. I have the most efficient light for making bud per photon. However, as I push the ppfd to extremes I max out the plant processes that my high red levels drive, when the Blue processes could still be pushed further.

            This is an interesting balance between how much light you have, and what colour is should be. With low light levels best done with lots of Red. However that high Red becomes limiting at higher light levels.

            This is why 288 boards are so good. In my mind, I just scrapped mine. At $30 each it's no real loss though.

            Comment


              #7
              I get it... The 4000K (plus a 660 peak) gives the most even (perhaps even sun-like) illumination. With all colour's likely to saturate the plant at the same time. Darwin might be hitting me with a book at this point.
              get it.jpg

              That extra Blue in the 4000K can't hurt, just as long as I light them up a bit brighter to get the Red back. Gaining Green at the same time. So I get more photons without maxing out any one colour so soon.

              This comes as no real surprise. The 3000K+Red is still the most efficient, but that's not my goal.



              Edit: They might of said White, rather than naming the colour temp, because it's not a single type used. I see the market offers a number of lights that mix 5000k and 3000K to balance the Red and Blue, without lifting the green as a 4000K could. I actually failed to find a 4000K qb288 in my short search.

              Comment


                #8
                Going to Play with these.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by f-e View Post
                  ....However, as I push the ppfd to extremes I max out the plant processes that my high red levels drive, when the Blue processes could still be pushed further.
                  I'm thinking there are times where you might not want to push the 'blue processes' further, like early bud development to keep bud leaf low.. What do you think about that?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Good call.
                    Due to heat limitations, my own trials with more blue have always been part of a trade off with red. I couldn't gain more blue without using less red. This itself has given me less useful energy. I have seen a good correlation between light levels and leaf production. Enough to wonder if adding blue would be a big influence on leaf production, if the plant was at this new highs in illumination.

                    I can only waffle here, as I just don't know. I suspect the need for lots of leaf is going to be greatly reduced though. However, need might not be the only driving force.

                    I think KB have restructured. The 6yo baba site where they used to sell single led reflectors has become grow lights. The express site replaced in Feb with a scaled down site of similar name. The same contact address though, iirc.

                    On baba you can get new boards still.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      as always, it is not enough to delve into the depths of the subject ... I cannot understand most of it without a translator and what the translation is good for is more than questionable for me. everyone who speaks english is of the opinion that it is horrible.

                      however, i form myself to understand from your text that your main focus is on the red and blue spectrum. it is the two wave ranges that chlorophyll a + b utilizes in large quantities.

                      .the carotenoids and xanthophylls, which are extremely important for all processes within the plant, need the yellow to the red spectrum. If there is not enough yellow light, you can shoot the plant with red and blue without achieving a visible improvement, rather the opposite.

                      There is a spectral range which is in the yellow / green and in the green / blue range. I have to look if I can find this report about it. this area enables an increase in total photosynthesis. without increasing red and blue. it is one of the reasons why i still work with ndl. all leds on the market give these spectra no / hardly any importance.

                      But the minimum law also applies to light. all photosynthesis processes only run properly as long as all spectra are available. you know that, but many others do not understand that light is something completely different for plants than it is for people. it is food. and one-sided or unbalanced food is to be urgently avoided in any way of life.


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