Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Kangativa's Mullumbimby Madness Grow

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Plantwrestler
    replied
    Originally posted by romanoweed View Post
    Plantwrestler, those look pretty cool! possibly abit soft, but nice dreamy fresh breeze.

    Show more please, more Aussie sativa, Bagseed.
    Thanks mate, I still have a few beans was really really blessed

    Leave a comment:


  • romanoweed
    replied
    Plantwrestler, those look pretty cool! possibly abit soft, but nice dreamy fresh breeze.

    Show more please, more Aussie sativa, Bagseed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Plantwrestler
    replied
    Here’s my pure Heirloom Australian Landrace Sativa “Ngarrindjerri “ as that’s the aboriginal tribe that gifted her to me ,as far as I know I am the only one left with these genetics except for the elder i got them from.
    I gave him a necklace with a vial on it and he has his around his neck now.
    I was lucky .
    Pics in my album and I have more too

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Stinky
    replied
    Hope kanga is free and well. MM is great genetics.



    12 or so years ago I was given a handful of them. Had no idea what they were, put em outside way too far north and didnt bother bringing cuts back in. One of many mistakes I've made. Wish I could turn that clock back.



    Heres one of those girls, mid September, way over my head. Still looked like this in October. I dusted the preflowers with short term amnesia pollen and managed to get seed's . The mm power came right thru in the f1. Roughly1/3 of them are extremely heady and hot blooded high's



    Last edited by Mr. Stinky; 12-11-2020, 00:09.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheDarkStorm
    replied
    Originally posted by OnlyPureSativas View Post
    If he grew the sativas many miles from the hybrids and the other sativas that were for breeding, then it's safe to say he preserved the pure sativas
    All kanga grew originally were sativas....three in particular....these were kept and backedup an reproduced for decades....this thread was originally started to showcase some of these...but part way through the thread they started doing a huge breading program to create an select a few other things....the sativas were used in this program an some hybrids were made as well as other things..any matings that were done I believe were done a few times from clones in controled conditions ..dont mean some of the pure sativa lines you see werent kept backed up in there pure form....but due to raids alot of the pure lines were lost....it was thanks to some friends and some of those hybrids that were made some of these lines survived and are still around today in some shape or form...

    Leave a comment:


  • OnlyPureSativas
    replied
    Originally posted by TheDarkStorm View Post
    Lol....how do you know if the sativa lines weren't kept pure...and have been kept like that for along long time...its a good thing some work was done with these lines an seeds given out to some people because most of the original pure lines were lost to the raids.....but it was thanks to guys like kanga as well as others some of these old lines were still around...
    If he grew the sativas many miles from the hybrids and the other sativas that were for breeding, then it's safe to say he preserved the pure sativas

    Leave a comment:


  • TheDarkStorm
    replied
    Originally posted by OnlyPureSativas View Post
    This so sad, someone has pure sativas growing in the right climate, and still makes crosses with lame hybrids and indicas? I bet those hybrids and their offspring had some pollen contaminate those pure sativas by now

    Lol....how do you know if the sativa lines weren't kept pure...and have been kept like that for along long time...its a good thing some work was done with these lines an seeds given out to some people because most of the original pure lines were lost to the raids.....but it was thanks to guys like kanga as well as others some of these old lines were still around...

    Leave a comment:


  • Labia Joose
    replied
    You said:
    "Here are a couple pics Donald M".
    Jesus... that cured bud looks nice. If you took a few of those leafy bits off and wound it round a stick, that would look just like some of the best I ever smoked. 1975. Earlier, in 1972, I scored some bullets - four for about A$5 - at a whorehouse in Singapore. (Only for the pot. Found out when we got there). I reckon we got through about 10% of one of them... before we had to leave for UK. Flushed about 2/3 oz of compressed primo SE Asian weed. Aceh or Nth Thai. Jesus, didnt I miss that in UK. It was all fat tobacco joints with a whisper of hash. If you were lucky. Truly horrible. And they keep saying: "Todays pot is just so more potent". Says who?

    Leave a comment:


  • sbeanonnamellow
    replied
    Originally posted by Lester Beans View Post
    Why can't you accept people like hybrids?

    I love sativa's but at night I don't want to be a wide eyed Jedi, I want to be a red eyed couch pilot.

    To each their own right?
    While dude obviously enjoys the sativa-types, I don't think his comment was referencing that aspect alone. There is depth to the hybridization of distinct landrace populations.

    People often distribute crops to foreign areas, providing opportunities for genetic exchange with related species, and creating habitats (frequently weedy) where hybrids will survive.
    On occasion, the result is the extermination of the genetic differences between once distinct groups and their natural distribution ranges. For example, this happened to alfalfa, a complex species derived historically from two very different wild parents, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L. Over the last six millennia, both in cultivation and in nature, these parental lineages have hybridized so extensively that most plants everywhere are of hybrid origin, one can no longer identify the overwhelming majority of plants as belonging to either original species, and so it is preferable to reduce the original rank of the parents to subspecies of one species (Small 2011). Cultivated assemblages are especially prone to losing their distinctness or simply becoming extinct (Jeffrey 1968), as their human masters' needs and tastes change. In Cannabis, hybridization between the most distinctive variations has largely obliterated populational differences, especially between the two groups of fiber biotypes and between the two groups of marijuana biotypes. THe two kinds of fiber plant (discussed earlier as groups 1 and 2) that have been recognized have been widely hybridized, by legal breeders, because of the resulting hybrid vigor; and the two kinds of marijuana plant that have been recognized (discussed earlier as groups 3 and 4) have also been widely hybridized (mostly illicitly) to provide for the different psychological states that many have come to appreciate, and also to generate plants with desired photoperiodic and size characteristics to meet local needs. Indeed, according to CLarke and Merlin (2013) "hybrids have become the predominant form of drug Cannabis grown throughout Europe and the New World." Taxonomy is a practical activity, and when most individuals encountered are hybrids, this needs to be considered for classification purposes.
    Selective cross-breeding of drug-type Cannabis accelerated in the 1970's. Germplasm from Afghanistan was smuggled into California in the early 1970's. (D. Watson, pers. commun. 1984), or the late 1970's (Clarke 1987). During the 1980's at least seven Cannabis breeders sold exotic germplasm in Holland. THey crossed plants of Indian heritage ("sweet but late maturing") with Afghani landraces, valued for rapid maturation, cold-tolerance, short stature, and dense, tightly-packed flower clusters. By the late 1980's, nearly all drug-type Cannabis grown in the USA, Canada, and Europe has been hybridized. Unadultereated plants of Indian heritage and Afghani landraces became difficult to obtain (Clarke 1987).

    Alarmingly, foreign germplasm has corrupted Indian and Afghani landraces in their former centers of diversity. Peterson (2009) deplored the importation of "Sunk #1" into South Africa around 1984, which "destabilized" the genepool. Jamaicans have replaced ganja of Indian origin with Afghani hybrids (J. McP, pers. observ. 2013). Beisler (2006) boasted of importing and growing "Mexican Gold" in Afghanistan around 1972. Pietri (2009) stated that Beisler crossed "Acapulco Gold" with Afghani landraces. Turner et al. (1979b) analyzed 12 accessions collected in northwest India, and some plants in Punjab expressed low THC/CBD profiles suggestie of Afghani landraces.

    Ubiquitous hybridization of "Sativa" and "Indica" has rendered their distinctions almost meaningless. Most hybrids are characterized as "Sativa-dominant" or "Indica-dominant." The arbitrariness of these designations is illustrated by "AK-47," a hybrid that won "Best Sativa" in the 1999 Cannabis Cup, and won "Best Indica" four years later. HYbrids have been assigned "strain" names. The desire for unique weed has led to an explosion of new strain names. At the dawn of this era, Watson (1985) offered 10 strains for sale.
    Fifteen years later, Clarke (2001) estimated that Dutch seed companies offered 150 strains for sale, and 80% of them contained hybridized ancestry from Watson's original strains. A decade later the number of named strains reached 900 (Cannabis Strain Database 2010). Leafly (2015) listed 1535 strain names, and ********** (2015) listed 6510 strain names. Doyle (2007) called the strain names "ganjanyms."

    In today's largly illicit market, strain names are swapped and counterfeited, and generally unreliable (Lee 2013; Sawler et al. 2015; Pierson 2016). Unrecognized hybrids have plagued recent taxonomic studies of "Sativa" and "Indica." Unrecognized hybrids assigned to C. sativa or C. indica dampen signal in any taxonomic methodology. WIdespread crossbreeding and introgression make it challengin gto meet the third goal of this book chapter: identifying differences between the NLD biotype ("Sativa") and the WLD biotype ("Indica"). The biotypes show differences in cannabinoids, terpenoids, and genetics.
    Hybrids are all good and fine, but willy nilly throwing pollen around is muddying up populations. There's a thread here on IC called Extinction by Hybridization that discusses this very phenomenon.

    https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?threadid=374724

    Much love

    Leave a comment:


  • Frosty Nuggets
    replied
    It's all good brothers and sisters.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lester Beans
    replied
    Why can't you accept people like hybrids?

    I love sativa's but at night I don't want to be a wide eyed Jedi, I want to be a red eyed couch pilot.

    To each their own right?

    Leave a comment:


  • OnlyPureSativas
    replied
    This so sad, someone has pure sativas growing in the right climate, and still makes crosses with lame hybrids and indicas? I bet those hybrids and their offspring had some pollen contaminate those pure sativas by now

    Leave a comment:


  • Huesos
    replied
    Hmong Thai

    Here are a couple pics Donald M. Thank You to Prof77 for allowing us the experience.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Donald Mallard
    replied
    Hey Huesos

    good to see you my friend ,
    and even better to see you are growing some of that old stuff from prof77 ,
    he would be so stoked man ,
    thanks heaps for putting up the picture , and if you can remember to pop up a dried shot later when she is done would be excellent ,

    enjoy man ..

    Leave a comment:


  • Huesos
    replied
    Hmong Thai

    Hola Donald M and Wally!


    Here is a pic of Hmong Thai....for your viewing pleasure:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X